Alexander Abramov from the camp 3, we like this program

Hello! Leader of the expedition to the South Pole, Alexander Abramov. Today, 10 th December, we went 6 hours, again we made about 11 kilometers. The weather was not very good: a strong wind, minus thirty. The main problem is that you can ... read more

Hello! Leader of the expedition to the South Pole, Alexander Abramov. Today, 10 th December, we went 6 hours, again we made about 11 kilometers. The weather was not very good: a strong wind, minus thirty. The main problem is that you can not stay long during a day just to eat and drink tea. Literally 2-3 minutes and that’s all ... you're cool and must go to escape, mask misted.

In general everything is all right. We go to bed now, putting the third camp. Given the point where we landed, we have to go another 70 km. But we are not upset, we like this fact. Many thanks to those who came up with this program, "Last Degree". Excellent opportunity to feel like a man, if you're a man.

I would recommend it to try. And you'll never forget this trip.

All ... bye! Bye! Until tomorrow.

Navigation in the South Pole from Alex Abramov

Hello, 7 Summits Club! This is Alexander Abramov from Antarctica.  We are in good mood, today it was the second day of our trek on skis to the South Pole on the program "Last Degree". We passed 11 kilometers. The pace was low, and we ... read more

Hello, 7 Summits Club! This is Alexander Abramov from Antarctica.

 We are in good mood, today it was the second day of our trek on skis to the South Pole on the program "Last Degree". We passed 11 kilometers. The pace was low, and we are thinking how to get rid of the products to be easier to go. I am pleased that we are very clearly go directly to the South Pole. In fact, the issues of navigation very difficult: there are no landmarks and the sun goes around the circle.

In general. I figured out with difficulty, I realized what was wrong in navigation yesterday.

It's very interesting: go on an absolutely barren desert in the southern hemisphere near the pole. There, its navigation very difficult. 30 degrees of frost, GPS is not work constantly, we have to introduce any amendments and go on a compass. And by the sun and the shadows, depending on time of day. By the way is a very interesting option, a person works as a sundial.

In all calculations, was made global error. Today until 3 am I thought, what is the reason and I finally managed to understand. Then, in Moscow, I'll tell you.

All kiss and hug (girls), shake a paw (boys)! Bye!

 

Valery Rozov and Red Bull Antarctica: Out of this World!

Famous Russian climber and BASE jumper Valery Rozov accomplished another milestone in his extraordinary career with the first ever jump from one of Antarctica's most inhospitable mountains. 'I felt like an astronaut in outer space' – ... read more

Famous Russian climber and BASE jumper Valery Rozov accomplished another milestone in his extraordinary career with the first ever jump from one of Antarctica's most inhospitable mountains.

'I felt like an astronaut in outer space' – Valery Rozov

At 2931 metres high, Mount Ulvetanna loomed frighteningly large as Rozov led an eight-strong team on Red Bull Antartica, bracing themselves for temperatures as low as -30°C.

After two weeks of preparation, Rozov climbed the face of the Ulvetanna together with his climbing colleague, Alexander Ruchkin, and mountain photographer, Thomas Senf. With his wingsuit on, he then flew for 45 seconds down the face of the mountain before opening his parachute and landing safely.

“It was like a journey to another planet," he said. “It’s deeply satisfying and has given me a long and lasting feeling of happiness."

Not one to rest on his laurels, however, Rozov was at it again soon afterwards.

With the plane home delayed, there was nothing else for it but to climb some more mountains as Rozov ascended the Tungespissen and the Holtanna – the only mountain in the Antarctic that had previously been used by a BASE jumper.

The Muscovite has attracted attention with his spectacular jumps in recent years, including a leap from the highest point of Mount Elbrus in Europe and more recently into an active volcano on Kamchatka in eastern Russia.

We're quite sure you won't have heard the last of Valery Rozov so bookmark redbull.com to find out about his next adventure.

by Chris Stanton

www.redbull.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The team of “Russia at the tops of the world" starts to Australia

Today, on the night, a new 7 Summits Club expedition to Australia and New Zealand started. Two main guides of the Club Olga Rumyantsev and Victor Bobok gone in the direction of Australia. Now we are sitting in Dubai. Before boarding a plane ... read more

Today, on the night, a new 7 Summits Club expedition to Australia and New Zealand started. Two main guides of the Club Olga Rumyantsev and Victor Bobok gone in the direction of Australia. Now we are sitting in Dubai. Before boarding a plane to Sydney we have a few hours left and we are not to lose time, organizing a small mobile office. No difference from our native office in Moscow, the usual attributes - laptops, guitars etc...

Best regards!

Victor Bobok, Olga Rumyantsev.

The main part of the expedition (15) flies to Australia tonight.

 

 

“Russia at the tops of the world" expedition team consists of 15 climbers from North Ossetia plus two guides of 7 Summits Club.

The idea of this campaign was born almost two years ago, its initiator famous Russia climber, chairman of the Federation of North Ossetia, Kazbek Khamitsaev. In 2008, the project began, first summit to climb was Mount Kilimanjaro. The next goal was South American highest peak – Aconcagua (February 2010). The 2010 is also scheduled to climb the summit of Mount Kosciuszko - the highest point of Australia. In 2011 Russia climbers going up on Mount McKinley in North America, in 2012 - on Mount Vinson in Antarctica. Next year Khamitsaev will climb North Face Mount Everest by a new route.

Finally, during the 2014 Olympics the team plans to climb Mount Elbrus with Olympic flame. From this climb it will be organized a teleconference with the Sochi.

The project is supported by the Government of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, Mountaineering Federation of Russia, Mountaineering Federation of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, the Alpine Club of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania "Kazbek".

Project Partner - OAO MegaFon

 

Main prizes of 2010 for climbers of Russia (and Ukraine)

Piolet d' Or of Russia will go to Irkutsk (Siberia, Baikal region). Denis Veretenin and Eugene Bashkirtsev received it for their climb of Selestal Peak in China. Prize "Steel Angel" for achievements in mountaineering among women was awarded ... read more

Piolet d' Or of Russia will go to Irkutsk (Siberia, Baikal region). Denis Veretenin and Eugene Bashkirtsev received it for their climb of Selestal Peak in China. Prize "Steel Angel" for achievements in mountaineering among women was awarded to Marina Kopteva (Kiev, Ukraine). For a solo climb on Morcheka Wall in the Crimea.

"Crystal Peak", a prize awarded by vote of website users of Risk.ru went to women's team: leader Marina Kopteva, Anna Jasinskaya (both from Kiev), Galina Chibitok (St. Petersburg) for West Face of Amin Brakk in Pakistan.

Brothers Nefedovs (Sergey and Andrey) from St. Petersburg, won a Risk.ru prize “for the best project”, for the first free climbing of the route Machombo on Morcheka.

 

Photos from Risk.RU

Piolet d' Or of Russia from Grivel

Denis Veretenin (right) and Eugene Bashkirtsev

 

Light style on Selestal Peak

Marina Kopteva - the main person in the party

 

West Face of Amin Brakk

Machombo on the Morcheka Wall in the Crimea - now free by Nefedovs brothers

 

 Andrey (left) and Sergey Nefedov

 

Ueli Steck as a guest of Russia

with Andrey Volkov - the president of Russian Mountaineering Federation

 

 

 

 

Alexander Abramov reports from Antarctica, information of 4 December

December 3, a team of 7 Summits Club landed in Antarctica. This is the first our team of the season. We follow the Program Skiing to the South Pole, a length of 111 km. The program is also called the "Last Degree». Band members: Alex ... read more

December 3, a team of 7 Summits Club landed in Antarctica. This is the first our team of the season. We follow the Program Skiing to the South Pole, a length of 111 km. The program is also called the "Last Degree». Band members: Alex Abramov (guide), Alexander Orlov, Arvydas Avulis (Lithuania).

So we flew to Antarctica. All day yesterday were gathering in Punta Arenas, it was a question to fly or not. Good weather was already 10 days and it began to deteriorate. Therefore, the flight was scheduled for the night. As a result, at 2 o'clock in the morning we were informed that we fly. At 5 a.m. the plane took off, and somewhere at 9 a.m. we were at Union Glacier.

This is a new airport, which the company ALE built at the new location. I can tell you: what made it fundamentally different from what was at Patriot Hills. At Patriot Hills was not bad, but here is just amazing. They brought a large number of new modules.

They are not simply shifted the airfield from place to place, they are completely modernized their camp.

Toilets now- a large modules with a metal frame with plastic trim. Inside, some pumps, all very civilized, cool. I think that in Antarctica there is no well-ordered place. Only at the South Pole, Amundsen Base - Scott .. There are cooler, of course. But the Union Glacier - this is a temporary camp, gradually approaching to civilization.

Union Glacier - a very interesting place, mountains are on all sides, very beautiful scenery. Strange, but there always windless, they say that since the opening of the camp there was no wind.

Approximately 50 people flew with us on the plane. Most of them were go to Mount Vinson (35 persons), several people go to the South Pole. We were told that one group is already working on our route, they came out 3 days ago.

Everything is going according to plan. Now we go to bed. The sun never sets, it continues to go, just becomes a night just below.

We got good skis and sleds. Tomorrow afternoon will be entirely devoted to preparation. The day after tomorrow (December 6) in the morning we will depart on 89-th degree and enter the route.

 

 

 

Breakfast at the top of Kilimanjaro

Today, 3rd December a group of the 7 Summits Club breakfasted at the top of Uhuru Peak, the highest point of the massive of Kilimanjaro and the whole of Africa. According to our Tanzanian partner Johnson Kimaro, our climbers reached the ... read more

Today, 3rd December a group of the 7 Summits Club breakfasted at the top of Uhuru Peak, the highest point of the massive of Kilimanjaro and the whole of Africa. According to our Tanzanian partner Johnson Kimaro, our climbers reached the summit in full and everyone was perfectly happy. List of members: Vitaly Golovach, Tatiana Golovach, Ilya Martynov, Yuliya Martynova, Vadim Yakimov, Alexey Krylov, Semion Khait.

Richard Parks ready to take on the world

In the third of his BBC columns, Richard talks about his final preparations for his '737 Challenge' during which he aims to climb the highest mountain on each continent, plus reaching both the South Pole and the North Pole for charity - all ... read more

In the third of his BBC columns, Richard talks about his final preparations for his '737 Challenge' during which he aims to climb the highest mountain on each continent, plus reaching both the South Pole and the North Pole for charity - all within seven months in a bid to raise £1m.

The clock is now ticking towards 12 December when I fly to South America and then Antarctica on the way to the start of this most gruelling of challenges.

It's just mind-blowing to think how quickly the challenge has come round from conceiving it 15 months ago. I'm both scared and excited, but just want the whole thing to start.

I've done all the training now and I don't think I can do any more. I feel physically and mentally prepared for the challenge, which if successful will see me become the first person to stand on the continental summits and the poles in the same calendar year.

The challenge consists of the South Pole, Mount Vinson (4,897m), Aconcagia (6,962m), Mount Kilimanjaro (5895m), Carstensz Pyramid (4,884m), the North Pole, Mount Everest (8,850m), Mount Denali (6,194m) and Mount Elbrus (5,642m).

If all goes to plan I'll be at the South Pole on 1 January and finish up at the top of Mount Elbrus on 31 July.

Over the last few months, and especially my final training on Cho Oyu in the Himalayas, I have developed this toolbox of mountaineering skills that will give me the best chance of success. But ultimately we are in the hands of mother nature and she could put a spanner in the works!

Since coming back from the Himalayas in October there has been no let up in attempting to boost my aerobic capacity. I competed in the Cardiff half marathon and then took part in the Cardiff Burn - a 10k run, a 42k bike and a 3k kayak. That was hard, but great preparation.

Everest would seem to be the biggest challenge but we have highlighted Denali as the toughest leg because in it's a brutal mountain in its own right

But I did have a setback when I lost my training partner on a run on the Ogmore coastal trail. Unfortunately my dog Ben fell down a hole and broke his leg. He's feeling a bit sorry for himself but he'll be okay.

The last couple of weeks I have been trying to taper down the training and have given Kevin Morgan, the former Wales international full-back who is helping me train, something of a poser.

I told him I want to be fit and fat before I go! I want to maintain my fitness but also to go into the challenge carrying a bit of extra weight with a big intake of carbohydrates.

A lot of my energies have been put in to the packing and sorting my gear out. I have to pack bags now that will be air freighted on to Everest base camp. Packing for nine legs over seven months is pretty challenging to say the least.

And on the other hand is the charity. I recently visited the cancer day care centre which was a real humbling experience and gave me some real inspiration for my trip.

I have spent every penny I have and every waking hour of the last 15 months on this unique challenge because I am very serious about it and its integrity. I was very down after my rugby career was ended with a shoulder injury and this has given me something to focus on.

At half-time during the Wales v New Zealand international at the Millennium Stadium I was presented with a special badge by Carwyn Jones, Wales' first minister, and WRU chief Roger Lewis. To get the ovation I did from the 70,000-odd fans in the stadium was a real lift.

After leaving on 12 December I don't get much thinking time because I'll be in Antarctica on 14 or 15 December and straight into the challenge. The plan is we get to the South Pole on 28 December.

And that poses a problem because I will have to wait there until 1 January so it qualifies with the calendar year requirements of the challenge. That has been one of the logistical hurdles I've had to overcome and I will have to get a flight back on my own on a supply plane.

Then it's back to Mount Vinson on Antarctica and then on to Aconcagia in South America - the highest mountain outside the Himalayas.

The crux of the challenge is further down the line - the North Pole, followed by Mount Everest and then on to Mount Denali. The North Pole presents the highest risk of cold or frost injury, and every day we are battling the north pole we are missing a day acclimatising on Everest.

Everest would seem to be the biggest challenge but we have highlighted Denali as the toughest leg because in it's a brutal mountain in its own right. Extreme weather systems and I will be doing it at my weakest mentally and physically because I will be coming straight off Everest.

We are aiming to be on Everest in April and May. Statistically the highest summit success rate is early May and after that we are looking at four to six days to climb Denali.

The aim then is to reach the summit of Mount Elbris before 31 July.

Richard Parks was speaking to BBC Sport Wales' Richard Thomas

Source: 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/rugby_union/welsh/9239634.stm

Changes in the program 7 volcanoes: the highest volcano of Asia is in China

The program "Seven Volcanoes" is relatively young. American Amar Amdalkar posted great material about it on the pages of his excellent site skimountaineer.com. We, in the 7 Summits Club, rather uncritically copied the list and took it for ... read more

The program "Seven Volcanoes" is relatively young. American Amar Amdalkar posted great material about it on the pages of his excellent site skimountaineer.com. We, in the 7 Summits Club, rather uncritically copied the list and took it for granted. However, refinement began to appear. The first was Mount Giluve in Papua, as the highest volcano in Australia. And now it appeared quite clear that the highest volcano in Asia is in China, in the mountains of Kun-Lun. Ka-er-daxi is 5808 meters high.

 

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http://www.volcanolive.com

Kunlun Volcano is located in Tibet. The volcanic group contains 70 pyroclastic cones and basaltic lava flows. Ashi Shan volcano in the western end of the group is the youngest volcano in China (also known as Ka-er-daxi or Vulkan).

1951 Eruption

The eruption of Kunlun in 1951 was the most recent eruption in China. It was a central vent explosive eruption witnessed by road building workers.

The Kunlun Shan is a major mountain system of Asia, situated in China about halfway between the Himalayas and Tian Shan. It stretches one thousand miles, its snow-and-glacier-clad peaks rising abruptly along the north edge of the vast dry Tibetan plains.

The Kunlun Shan becomes progressively more narrow from east to west, and the narrow western section, just east of the Pamirs, is where the highest peaks are found, towering seventy five miles south of Kashi, the largest city in western Xinjiang Province, China. Near the center of the Kunlun Shan, a 500-mile northern branch called the Altun Tagh splits from the main range and extends northeast.

http://www.summitpost.org/vulkan-ka-er-daxi/464166

This peak is to the best of my knowledge, unclimbed. If it is and the Xinjiang Mountaineering Association decides to follow the rules strictly, the peak fee will be 4400-10255$US! The peak is very small compared to its neighbors and you may be lucky and not charged at all for climbing it. Sometimes you can climb peaks below 6000m with no charge.

Kunlun Shan on Summitpost 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dan Mallory has one last mountain to climb

The local insurance broker has climbed the highest peak of just about every continent with family members. Two years ago, the Mallory family made headlines as the first family to reach the summit of Mount Everest. "The goal that was set 10 ... read more

The local insurance broker has climbed the highest peak of just about every continent with family members. Two years ago, the Mallory family made headlines as the first family to reach the summit of Mount Everest. "The goal that was set 10 years ago, was that I climb the highest mountain of every continent with at least one member of my immediate family," said Mallory, who lives in Utopia. The last mountain could well be the most challenging. But Mallory, 59, won't be going at it alone. He'll be joined by Laura, 23, and Adam, 28.

Laura, now a nurse working in Parry Sound, became the youngest Canadian woman to successfully climb Everest. Adam is an electrical engineer in Mississauga.

Second son, Alan, 25, won't be involved in this climb, but he'll be close by.

Newly married, the mechanical engineer took a job in Santiago, Chile. There could well be a family reunion when the climbing trio stops there en route to Antarctica's Mount Vinson.

Dan's wife, Barbara, won't be climbing, but she is making her own arrangements to support the climbing family, likely from a base in Chile.

The climbers are leaving Barrie Dec. 11 and hope to summit Mount Vinson sometime around Christmas.

For Laura, it's a trip of a lifetime that she agreed to go on only last week.

"I almost missed this opportunity," she said incredulously. "I was considering not going because of a job. I should have said yes right away, without thinking about it. It can change your life forever."

It all worked out in the end. She was offered to fill a maternity leave in February, a month or so after the family's return from the climb.

Antarctica is considered the bottom of the world circling the South Pole. It is almost entirely covered by ice, has no government and no permanent population, although it is something of a magnet for researchers, attracting up to 5,000 people to research stations scattered across the continent.

While Mount Vinson isn't considered the toughest of the highest peaks to climb, it is perhaps the least accessible.

"This one has a number of unique challenges," begins Mallory.

Because it is so remote, it will cost the Barrie-area family just about as much to get to as Everest did. The cost of the Everest climb for each Mallory family member was between $40,000 to $45,000, substantially less than the average $75,000 to $100,000 most people shell out to reach the top of the world.

So far, the plan is to fly to Santiago where the Mallorys will catch another flight to Punta Arenas, a city close to the size of Barrie. There the Mallorys will spend about five days getting supplies, organizing their gear and making final arrangements.

From there they will board a Russian propeller plane and land on a blue ice runway at the Patriot Hills encampment, run by an expedition support and touring company. It is a seasonal camp populated by tents during that continent's summer, from November to January.

From there, they board a smaller plane for a one-hour, 15- minute flight to Mount Vinson where they will begin their climb of the 16,200-foot mountain.

Flying from Punta Arenas costs $25,000 per person.

Oxygen isn't necessary for the climb, but there are challenges related to the air. The lower barometric pressure so close to the South Pole means the air is less dense and could feel like a mountain more than 5,000 feet taller than it actually is.

The Mallorys are preparing for the possible physiological impacts. While they each suffered from altitude sickness to some degree at Everest, none advanced to pulmonary or cerebral edema, so they're hoping their bodies will adjust on Mount Vinson as well.

The biggest challenge could well be the wind.

"I'm suspecting the winds are going to be the most unique thing we're going to be dealing with," said the senior Mallory. "But we might be lucky.

"I'm hoping for a clear day, without any wind and we'll get a magnificent view of the Ellsworth Mountains."

It's known to get as cold as -- 125 F, but it will likely be closer to -30 F during their venture.

Just the same, the Mallorys expect their experience at Everest to serve them well.

Certainly much of the gear and clothing they gathered for the Himalayan climb will, once again, be useful.

"I think we could probably live in a freezer with the gear we've got," he laughs.

The advantage is the 24 hours of sunlight.

Just the same, the weather has got to be optimal for the actual day of the climb.

Typically, the Mallorys don't use guides.

This approach served them well at Everest -- there is no better group on which to rely than family members who you trust, know and understand. Unlike solo climbers, who each have individual goals, the Mallorys know they can rely, implicitly, upon each member of their own group. No one Mallory triumphs over another.

The Mallorys have found reliance upon their own judgement to serve them well. But to get to the mountain at the bottom of the world the Mallorys have to use an outfitter and are obliged to take a guide. They will be joined by a climber from Japan. While climbing the Seven Summits was the original goal of the senior Mallory, the plan to include family members in all the climbs leaves the door open for the three children to follow in their dad's footsteps. Afterall, they've all conquered Everest.

"It's actually a feasible goal for me," said Laura, who will have four of the summits under her belt by the end of the year. "I just need someone to climb with for the others."

"I have to be the luckiest dad in the world to have all my family members interested in doing the activities I love so much," said Dan Mallory.

"We can illustrate to others that you can have this relationship with your kids and your family."

thebarrieexaminer.com

- - -

The Seven Summits

At the beginning of this year, 275 people had climbed the seven summits - the highest mountains on the seven continents. By the beginning of next, Dan Mallory expects to add his name to that list. His accomplishments will include:

2002-- Mt. Aconcagua (6,962 m/22,841 ft.), highest mountain in South America;

2004-- Mt. McKinley (6,193m /20,320 ft.), highest in North America 2005-- Mt. Kosciuszko (2,228 m/ 7,310 ft.), highest mountain inAustralia;

2006-- Mt. Elbrus (5,642 m/18,510 ft.) -highest European peak; 2006-- Mt. Kilimanjaro (5,895 m/ 19,342 ft.), highest mountain inAfrica; 2008 - Mt. Everest (8,848 m/29,029 ft.), highest mountain inAsia; 2010 - Mt. Vinson (4,892 m/ 16,050 ft.), highest mountain inAntarctica.

Alexander Abramov, from Punta Arenas, the great work began

Arriving in the well-known, friendly city of Punta Arenas, Alex Abramov immediately set to work. First of all - negotiations with ALE, thy must agree everything related to organization and to final payment for programs. Representatives of ... read more

Arriving in the well-known, friendly city of Punta Arenas, Alex Abramov immediately set to work. First of all - negotiations with ALE, thy must agree everything related to organization and to final payment for programs. Representatives of the firm told the good news: the weather in Union Glacier is good. The expectations were confirmed: due to better wind rose, landing of the IL-76 is gone with more reliability. On Saturday, the fourth flight was made, almost all equipment was delivered to Antarctica, the base camp is set. The first group at Vinson has already gone to the Camp Union Glacier.

Alex Abramov will spent three days, waiting for arrival of our first group. In the morning he took from the stock of ALE equipment left after last years season. "Now I will check, it and prepare for transportation”.

Our new group is in Tanzania, summer begins very soon

November, 28 a next group of 7 Summits Club came to Tanzania to climb Rilimanjaro, the highest peak of Africa. The program includes: climbing the Marangu route, safari in national parks and finish in Zanzibar. List of groups: Vitaly ... read more

November, 28 a next group of 7 Summits Club came to Tanzania to climb Rilimanjaro, the highest peak of Africa. The program includes: climbing the Marangu route, safari in national parks and finish in Zanzibar. List of groups: Vitaly Golovach, Tatiana Golovach, Ilya Martynov, Yuliya Martynova, Vadim Yakimov, Alexey Krylov, Semion Hait. December 1 it will begin summer of Kilimanjaro. So a contrast with the cold Russia will be significant.

Alexander Abramov flew to Antarctica

Yesterday we said “good by” to our leader, President of the 7 Summits Club Alexander Abramov to Antarctica. He flew out on Saturday morning, as a minimum, for two months. For a modest table there were spoken high words that ... read more

Yesterday we said “good by” to our leader, President of the 7 Summits Club Alexander Abramov to Antarctica. He flew out on Saturday morning, as a minimum, for two months. For a modest table there were spoken high words that connection with him will not be interrupted. Even in the hours and days when modern means of communication will not be able to support it. In the near future, Alexander arrived at the extreme south of Chile, the city of Punta Arenas. December 3, his team plans to fly in Antarctica. It seems to be that an airplane bridge "Continent - Union Glacier” works well and we hoped that the flight will be made on time. We will wait for messages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sokolov and Gorelik plan a new route on Everest

Gleb Sokolov announced his plans for 2011. He just ensured supports of sponsors: NPF Basc, Grivel, etc. and could now begin to detail plans of expeditions. Projects are, we must say, impressive. Gleb with his partner, Vitaly Gorelik (both ... read more

Gleb Sokolov announced his plans for 2011. He just ensured supports of sponsors: NPF Basc, Grivel, etc. and could now begin to detail plans of expeditions. Projects are, we must say, impressive. Gleb with his partner, Vitaly Gorelik (both from Novosibirsk), is going to climb a new route on Everest. Some experts believe that is impossible to find something new on the slopes of the highest mountain of the World. But look on the East Face, so-called Kanchung Face ! There are three unclimbed buttresses between the American route and the North-East ridge.

Scared even to look? Eyes do not believe, but the hands and feet are doing. That is what these guys have been doing on Pobeda Peak in 2009. Conditions on mountains can be different, you need to watch and think. According to the plan of expedition, acclimatization will be on the classic route from the north side. Probably, it will be in cooperation with a team of 7 Summits Club (leader Alex Abramov). And then, climbers are going to cross the pass ... to make a decision and implement it.

If everything succeeds, they were still alive, then for next summer, Gleb plans to climb a new route also for Pobeda Peak. For this purpose, Alexander Kirikov should join Sokolov and Gorelik. Last season, he participated in climbing a partly new route "Snake" on Khan-Tengri. Sokolov knows Pobeda Peak better than anyone, he climbed it by 4 different routes. Now he has a new idea for new routes.

 

 

Gorelik (left) and Sokolov

 

Aireal  photo by Leo Dickinson

 

 

Gleb Sokolov born in 1953 (September, 5)

He began climb in 1972. His first high-altitude summit was Peak Lenin in 1979.

Master Sport, many time winner and prized of Russia Mountaineering Championship.

Snow Leopard (all seven-thousanders of the former USSR): Peak Lenin, Peak Communism, Peak Korzhenevskoy, Peak Pobeda, Khan Tengri – more than 50 climbs. Gleb have a speed climb record on Pobeda Peak – 20 hours.

Himalayan ascents:

Makalu 1996

Lhotse 1997 and 2000

Lhotse Shar 1998

Lhotse Middle (first climb) 2001.

Everest North Face (new route) 2004

K2 West Face (new route) 2007

Manaslu 2009/

For a new route on Pobeda Peak Sokolov and Gorelik were nominated for Piolet d’Or in 2009 for

Married, 4 children, one grandson.

 

Piolet d'Or 2009. Vitaly and Gleb are staying in the middle

 

We have updated the registration system on our website, please check your dates

We finished the next stage of development of our Internet projects (our sites). We have made several important changes and improvements. And it is made for you, our friends. First of all, we changed the registration system. In this regard, ... read more

We finished the next stage of development of our Internet projects (our sites). We have made several important changes and improvements. And it is made for you, our friends. First of all, we changed the registration system. In this regard, we ask you to review your own data, which were transferred from the previous version of registration. Inform us if you have any problem with registration.

Also, now you can join not only the "7 Summits" project, but also  you could  register your achievements in other projects, namely:

Snow Leopard

14 Eight-Thousanders

7 Volcanoes

3 Poles

A new is a total ranking of member - a summary from all these projects. We also added "additional" peaks and objects to these projects ...

And you can leave now your comments to news and articles. It is very important to us. On the one hand, we are happy just to hear from each of you. On the other hand, we look forward to use your comments to improve quality of our publications.

To register your achievements in projects use following links

Russian version http://klub7vershin.ru/enter/

English version http://7summits-club.com/enter/

Photogallery from Olga Rumyantseva, Machame route on Kilimanjaro, November 2010

Photogallery from Olga Rumyantseva, Machame route on Kilimanjaro, November 2010. "All along the way to the summit, we were either wet on the rain, or fall into the snow. Weather pleased us only on the day of ascent. It was not very cold, ... read more

Photogallery from Olga Rumyantseva, Machame route on Kilimanjaro, November 2010.

"All along the way to the summit, we were either wet on the rain, or fall into the snow. Weather pleased us only on the day of ascent. It was not very cold, almost windless and beautiful view. In the end, six persons climbed to the top: Alexander Osiev, George Karnaukhov, Vladimir, Ilya, Andrei (he is 16 years old and this is his first mountain) Fedortsovs, as well as guide the 7 Summits Club Olga Rumyantseva".

 

 FULL GALLERY IS HERE >>>>>>>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9-year-old to climb Mount Everest and more news

(CNN) -- This year a 13-year-old from California stunned the world when he became the youngest person to summit Mount Everest. Now a 9-year-old Nepalese boy says he can do it, too. Or at least that's what the child's father is reportedly ... read more

(CNN) -- This year a 13-year-old from California stunned the world when he became the youngest person to summit Mount Everest. Now a 9-year-old Nepalese boy says he can do it, too. Or at least that's what the child's father is reportedly promising.

Sherpa Pemba Dorje, who holds the world record for the fastest Everest ascent (8 hours, 10 minutes), recently boasted that his grade-schooler will try to conquer the globe's tallest mountain in 2011.

To illustrate his seriousness, Dorje and his son Tseten last week climbed Mount Ramdung, a 19,440-foot peak in the Dolakha region of Nepal, according to the Himalayan Times daily and the Indo-Asian News Service. Dorje told reporters it was a practice run for Everest, which is more than 29,000 feet.

 

The notion of another baby-faced adventurer -- backed by an ambitious parent --sailing the widest seas or climbing the tallest mountain unearths a familiar question: Does inherently dangerous record-setting have an age limit?

"Little children do not belong on big mountains," said Jiban Ghimire, a Nepali renown for leading multiple expeditions on Everest. Ghimire's Shangri-La Treks & Expeditions, a go-to climbing assistance company, has employed Dorje as a guide. "I know Pemba Dorje, and I know he's said he wants his child to do this, that his son is capable of it.

"I would not want to discover, on that mountain, that the boy is not capable," Ghimire said. "I feel that you ask for something bad with this."

The obvious objections to allowing a child to climb Everest, or any major mountain, have to do with the physical toll it could take on his or her body. While there's no conclusive research that an adolescent is more susceptible to developing potentially fatal altitude sickness, anecdotes of mental and physical woe abound.

Past Everest climbers have experienced motor-skill dysfunction, sleep troubles, language disassociation and other problems that may be related to depriving the brain of oxygen while climbing, experts say.

Alan Arnette, a Colorado-based climber, has been on 20 expeditions from Tibet to Argentina. He most recently climbed 27,500 feet up Everest.

"Nobody doubts how talented Sherpa Pemba is," Arnette said. "Any Westerner would be smart to trust their life with him on the mountain. But that's any adult."

"When you get up there, it's not like you're gasping for air, you feel like you want to sit down and sleep forever -- that's altitude sickness," he said. "You have to be aware of what your body is doing and act accordingly. That's an adult's experience. Who knows what would happen to a developing child."

Besides, Arnette surmises that the odds of the boy making it past base camp are "just about zero."

The China Tibet Mountaineering Association, which regulates expeditions in Tibet, issued new climbing rules this year that ban anyone younger than 18 from climbing the Tibet side of Everest. A climber must be 16 to attempt Everest from the Nepali side. Penalties for breaking the rules are stiff, ranging from high fines to prison.

Arnette points out that every expedition must have a permit, which can cost tens of thousands of dollars. It's relatively easy for Everest authorities to catch someone trying to climb illegally, he said. Permits must be shown to officials when entering the park, and liaison officers from the Nepal Ministry of Tourism are assigned to each expedition group to help in case something goes wrong, and to ensure groups aren't leaving behind garbage.

In Dorje's case, everyone on the mountain knows who he is. He's clearly drumming up publicity for the climb. So why? Is it money? Arnette doesn't think so.

"No company or sponsor is going to get behind this. There's too much risk," he said. "My best guess is that he's motivated by national pride."

In May American Jordan Romero, 13, became the youngest person to summit Everest.

"I think all the Everest records should be held by Nepalese people," Dorje told London's Daily Mail.

Jordan received worldwide press for his feat, most of it glowing, and he encouraged younger kids to follow in his bootsteps. "Age is not a matter," Jordan told reporters in Kathmandu a day after he returned from his climb, which took 10 months and 10 days. "My body did cope with the altitude very well."

The teenager broke a record few thought possible.

"The American boy is famous. When many people think of Everest, they say his name," Ghimire said. "But a mountain doesn't care who you are."

 

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Adventurer Chessell hangs up his boots

 

Adelaide adventurer Duncan Chessell, a three-time conqueror of the world's highest mountain, has hung up his climbing boots and is planning to go prospecting for gold and uranium.

 

 Chessell has joined newly formed company Endeavour Discoveries as its managing director and will take a break from leading expeditions to such places as the Himalayas or Antarctica for a few years.

"I have faced many challenges and overcome almost all of them by working with extraordinary teams of people on seven continents and have enjoyed almost every minute of it," Chessell said in an email to his clients and supporters on Monday.

 "I have now reached a stage where I am over living from backpacks though.

 "So thanks for coming along for the ride, sail, paddle, walk, climb - it has been simply awesome."

 In May this year Chessell became the first Australian to reach the summit of Mt Everest three times in an expedition hampered in its final push by heavy snowfalls.

 His triumph followed his two previous trips to the top of the world in 2001 and 2007.

Chessell has sold his Chessell Adventures company to friend and sales and office manager Katie Sarah. Sarah was part of the group that reached the Everest summit this year.

 As the boss of Endeavour Discoveries Ltd, he plans to take the company to a public float in the next 12 to 18 months. "We are aiming to discover gold and uranium deposits in South Australia and the Northern Territory," he said.

 

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Bad Weather Strands Thousands near Mt. Everest

 Flights are still grounded at the air strip closest to Mt. Everest, stranding around 2,000 foreign tourists, including some Americans, in the small town of Lukla in eastern Nepal.

 "Again the weather was very bad today," wrote Phurba Gyeljen Sherpa, proprietor The Irish Pub and Internet Caf?. "Very few airplanes were able to go out and the Americans here, and other nationalities, have grown weary and frustrated."

 The military stepped in and posted flyers at the airport telling people not to pay more than $350 for private helicopter companies.

"Then they flew in large MI-17 military transport helicopters, cable of carrying 24 people each," continued Sherpa.

 The military chose who would fly out first by who was stranded there the longest, instead of those willing to pay the most money.

Since there was only a brief period of good weather, the military quickly ferried the stranded people to a nearby airstrip in Ramechhap, where the weather was more stable.

 When the weather destabilized, the military returned to Ramechhap and tourists to Kathmandu.

Slightly over 75 percent of westerners were evacuated.

 

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Will Wi-Fi ruin Mount Everest?

Broadband arrives on the world's tallest mountain. But having hiked it, I worry the magic will vanish

By Jeff Greenwald

 When I began my career as a travel journalist in the 1980s, there was lots of talk about "remoteness." This was what many travelers were looking for: places so hard to get to, and so different from the world we knew, that their very existence seemed almost miraculous.

 Today, the value has shifted. What we look for now is connectedness: the opportunity to check our e-mail, upload video clips and chat on Skype -- even if we happen to be on the Khumbu Icefall, 18,000 feet high in the Nepal Himalaya.

 Last week, a network of eight 3G base stations began operating along the route to Mount Everest, in Sagarmatha National Park. They were installed by Ncell, a Nepali telecom firm. The news didn't surprise me. But I felt that, irreversibly, another blow had been struck against magic.

 

 Access to the Internet is starting to seem like a human right, so let me offer a disclaimer. There is no rational downside to the arrival of broadband on the flanks of Everest. I'm not a Luddite, and would never suggest that developing nations should be denied, for any reason, the global access that technology can provide. This 3G network will undoubtedly save lives -- not only by providing weather information and support to Everest climbers and trekkers, but as an alert system for the nearby villages threatened by flash floods from Glacial Lake Overflow (GLOF), another peril caused by global warming.

 It's a good thing. So why did the news make me feel like Robert Conway in "Lost Horizon," looking back on a land to which I can never return?

 During my earliest visit to Nepal in 1979, phoning home even from Kathmandu was an adventure. I'd bike to the Telecommunications Office at 2 a.m. (mid-afternoon in New York), fill out a form, and wait hours for my trunk call to go through. The costly result was often a busy signal -- or a barely audible connection. The most reliable means of communication was "snail mail": a metaphor that, with three weeks of lag time between a letter and its response, seemed literally true.

 Even this much contact was a marvel, compared to the situation in the mountains. When I first trekked the Everest route, in October 1983, it felt as though I'd entered a world completely detached from the familiar. After a harrowing flight to the tiny airstrip at Lukla, the 10-day hike to Base Camp (with an elevation gain of more than 8,000 vertical feet) began. Immersion in the Sherpa Buddhist lifestyle was inescapable, and transformative. Phone calls were impossible. Even writing a postcard was like putting a message in a bottle, and tossing it out to sea.

 None of this seemed like an inconvenience. Though there were bouts of homesickness, and the occasional longing for new music and old friends, it was exhilarating to have entered such an isolated realm. This, actually, was the point. Travelers embarked on our journeys to Everest or the Annapurnas aware that it would be a full-body experience -- an equation that included our brains.

 As a result, trekking in the Himalaya never felt like sightseeing. It was a commitment to the here and now, demanding full-time engagement with both Nepalis and fellow travelers. There were infinite opportunities to forge new friendships, experience Sherpa Buddhist culture, or enjoy exquisite solitude. By day, you could walk alone or with companions; at night, the lodges flickered with candles and butter lamps. Out came the maps, backgammon sets and tattered journals. Tales of avalanches and Yeti sightings were shared, along with cups of the dizzying local rakshi.

 During my most recent trek to Everest region in 2008, it was clear that the area was changing. Though the mountains looked the same, they felt less like a world apart. For one thing, it was a lot more crowded; an estimated 15,000 trekkers shared the narrow trails. Cellphones were already in use between the main villages, and the isolating aspects of technology were taking hold. Sherpa guides and sinewy porters marched up the steep mountain grades with telltale white headphone cords snaking beneath their parka collars, lost in the private soundtracks of their MP3 files.

 Getting online was a different story. There were only a handful of cybercafes along the trekking route -- the highest of which was at Everest Base Camp itself, at 17,500 feet -- with Internet access via satellite. Connections were sluggish; it often took Gmail more than five minutes to load. Sitting in a cozy inn, immersed in conversation, was far more seductive than surfing the Web.

 The arrival of 3G will change all that -- and not just how quickly trekkers can upload their photos to Flickr, keep tabs on their investments, or stream the latest episode of "Mad Men." Wireless broadband, barely imaginable even 25 years ago, will change the way future travelers and locals interact in the world's highest mountains.

 For the Sherpas of Sagarmatha, of course, it may well seem that one kind of magic has simply been traded for another. Broadband on Everest! What next? If the Yeti buys an iPad, he might even decide to "friend" Bigfoot on Facebook.

 For the rest of us, this constant connectedness may have a bittersweet aftertaste. My recent trek into the Himalaya was a reminder of the pleasures of remoteness. It was a joy to escape from the hamster wheel of distractions, and immerse myself in the expanded moment of real time. Because being connected -- really connected, with the place you're in and the people you're with -- requires disconnecting, at least temporarily, from everywhere else.

 We are far past the time when we can expect to a find a Shangri-la, anywhere, beyond the reach of the Internet. But as the world races toward connectivity, travelers might stop to consider why we travel in the first place, and which connections we really want to make.

 

 

 

 

Autumn 2010, summary from Ang Tsering and Explorerweb

Nepal Expeditions - Autumn 2010 (Government Peaks): The following is the detail of the permits issued to expedition teams for 8000m Peaks by the Ministry of Tourism and Civil Aviation in this Autumn Season 2010: 2 Teams of 1 member each on ... read more

Nepal Expeditions - Autumn 2010 (Government Peaks):

The following is the detail of the permits issued to expedition teams for 8000m Peaks by the Ministry of Tourism and Civil Aviation in this Autumn Season 2010:

2 Teams of 1 member each on Mt. Everest (Nepal Side)

2 Teams with a total 6 members on Mt. Lhotse

8 Teams with a total of 86 members on Mt. Manaslu

2 teams with total of 9 members Mt. Dhaulagiri from Nepal Himalayas

The above figures do not include the number of high altitude Sherpa (HAS) climbers.

Tibet Expeditions - Autumn 2010:

The following are the teams permitted on 8000m Peaks in Tibet:

2 Teams with a total of 12 climbers on Mt. Everest (including HAS)

25 Teams with a total of 340 climbers on Mt. Cho-oyu (including HAS)

3 Teams with a total of 45 climbers on Mt. Shishapangma(including HAS)

Death and Casualties:

Mt. Dhaulagiri (8167m):

An avalanche on Mt. Dhaulagiri killed three Japanese climbers, Osumu Tanabe(49 yrs),Toshio Yamamoto(36 yrs) and Daisuke Honda(32 yrs) and a Nepalese Guide Pasang Geylu Sherpa on 28th September.

Mt. Cho-Oyu (8201m):

The leader of the Cho-Oyu South West Face Expedition 2010, Walter Nones(39 yrs) of Italy had a fatal fall on 3rd October and died while climbing Mt. Cho-Oyu from South West Face New Route.

Mt. Manaslu (8163m) Base Camp:

Mr. Nobuaki Kuwabara(61 yrs) of Japan diet at the Base Camp of Manaslu on 24 September 2010. He was member of "Adventure Guides Mt. Manaslu Exp.2010" under the Leadership of Mr. Kenji Kondo of Japan.

We pray that may all the departed souls rest in peace and express our condolence to their family members and friends.

UIAA General Assembly Highlight:

The UIAA General Assembly which was held from 6th-9th October in Bormio was very fruitful. The outcome of the assembly is beneficial to all the members of UIAA. It focused on the necessity of the Expedition Commission to be re-activated. On the sidelines of the 2010 UIAA General Assembly, leading members of the global climbing community discussed the concerns of climbers and challenges of undertaking expeditions to high and remote mountain ranges.

The next general assembly of UIAA will be held on 5th to 8th October 2011 and the general assembly of UAAA will be held on 9th October 2011. Both the events will be hosted by Nepal in Kathmandu. Since the same year Nepal is celebrating Nepal Tourism Year 2011, I hope that both the events will be instrumental in promoting Nepal Tourism Year 2011 to make it a great success, as well as bringing many benefits to the mountaineering community.

 

Summit of Manaslu

 

Explorerweb

October 15 at 12:30 PM Eric Larsen plus Sherpas Dawa Gylatzen, Tshering (Chhering) Dorje, Pasang Temba and Dawa Tenzing bagged the first Everest fall season summit in four years. The Terramar sponsored expedition concluded Larsen’s quest to reach the “Three Poles” in record time.

Serial Everest summiteer lost on Baruntse The loss of Chhewang Nima Sherpa put a sad end to the climbing autumn season, wrapped up in a special report by Ang Tshering Sherpa. 19x Everest summiter Chhewang Nima Sherpa was caught in an avalanche while fixing ropes on Baruntse upper sections.

Marty Schmidt’s “shortest Himalaya expedition ever” Marty cut his solo 4-day Lhotse attempt short in order to guide a client on Ama Dablam.

Jordises out of Lhotse Spanish “K2 pirates” Corominas and Tosas finally threw in the towel on Lhotse, due to dangerous conditions.

Shisha Pangma South Koreans Chang-Ho Kim, 41, and Sung-Ho Suh summited Shisha Pangma at 2:15PM on October 14, after climbing the British route on the peak’s south side. Chang-Ho Kim claims Shisha as his twelfth 8000er without supplementary O2; Sung-Ho Kim his tenth.

Cho Oyu summit mysteries German Ralf Arnold told ExplorersWeb he was the first Cho Oyu summiteer of the season, topping out October 1, 2010 at 10:30AM in a 15 hours roundtrip from C2. An October 7 Cho Oyu summit claimed by Argentinean Adrian Sanchez was questioned after the alleged summit picture turned out shot in C1 by expedition mate Marcelo Hernandez.

Dhaulagiri Search parties found the body of Daisuke Honda, one of the four climbers swept by an avalanche, buried in snow at about 5,000 meters on Dhaula.

Manaslu Together with a Japanese climber and his two Sherpas, Mexican couple Badía Bonilla and Mauricio López reached Manaslu summit sans O2 at 2:40PM, local time on October 1, some time after the HiMex and Carlos Pauner’s groups. “We were the last to summit that day,” Badia debriefed back in Kathmandu.

Blind Everest summiteer Erik Weihenmayer led a team of war-battered soldiers to the top of the 20,075-foot Lobuche on October 13.

Putha Hiunchuli (7,246m) was topped out on October 8 by Dutch Dick Valk, Kaji Sherpa and expedition leader Paul Boslooper.

Alex Abramov will be at inauguration of our new blue-ice runway at Union Glacier

Information ALE. More than 20 years ago Adventure Network International (ANI) made history by establishing a blue-ice runway at Patriot Hills and flying tourists into the interior of Antarctica. ALE purchased ANI in 2003 and continued to ... read more

Information ALE. More than 20 years ago Adventure Network International (ANI) made history by establishing a blue-ice runway at Patriot Hills and flying tourists into the interior of Antarctica. ALE purchased ANI in 2003 and continued to develop and improve operations in that same pioneering spirit. ALE has now completed a four year process to assess and certify a new runway that will improve flight reliability and open up new frontiers for exploration.

ALE is pleased to announce the inauguration of our new blue-ice runway and re-furbished camp at Union Glacier (79° 45'S 083° 14'W), 70 km north-west of Patriot Hills.

Union Glacier Blue-Ice Runway (SCGC) has been inspected and is a fully certified runway that can take intercontinental jets from South America. Proving flights were successfully undertaken by ALE's Ilyushin in December 2009 and January 2010. ALE's first passenger flight from Punta Arenas, Chile to SCGC will take place mid-November 2010 at the start of our 2010 Antarctic season.

After much research, ALE identified Union Glacier as a potential landing site in 2006. Two seasons of weather data was gathered and detailed surveys carried out on the blue-ice runway to determine its suitability for landing heavy aircraft, before certification by the Chilean Civil Aviation Authorities in November 2008.

ALE's new, into-wind runway will allow us to offer a more predictable flight schedule; less likelihood of delays to our programs; and enhanced logistic support in Antarctica. Henceforth, intercontinental flights will operate into SCGC. Patriot Hills will remain as our secondary runway in Antarctica.

Union Glacier Camp

 

 

 

 

 

 

The camp setting is spectacular. Scenic peaks rise in all directions providing many opportunities for technical climbing, scenic hikes, and ski touring. Surpisingly for Antarctica, there is often little wind at camp, providing a comfortable environment to relax and take it all in.

Our new Union Glacier camp is located at the base of Mount Rossman, 8km from the runway. On landing, guests will be directed to a new heated passenger terminal, where they will pick up a shuttle service to the camp. Two new, specially-adapted 4x4 passenger vans will be used for passenger shuttles.

The completely refurbished base camp now offers the height of Antarctic field comforts for up to 80 guests. ALE has made a significant investment in infrastructure and at each stage of the planning process has considered how to improve environmental standards; enhance our guests' experience; and improve operational efficiency.

Complimentary meal service is now provided in the Guide Complex at our Union Glacier Camp for Guide Companies, expeditions, and non-guided groups.

Union Glacier is an active glacier with a number of crevassed areas, so we have groomed and marked a snow road network around the camp and blue-ice runway, and to the main areas for guest activities. The whole area will be zoned to indicate safe and unsafe areas to work and travel.

 

Patriot Hills