Providing expeditions
since 2005

The next success on Aconcagua

Aconcagua. Today we received a message from our guide Victor Bobok from Aconcagua. Yesterday, 16 February, the group climbed the summit. The ascent was complicated by the fact that was started from the camp "Nido de Condores”. Everybody is very ... read more

Today we received a message from our guide Victor Bobok from Aconcagua. Yesterday, 16 February, the group climbed the summit. The ascent was complicated by the fact that was started from the camp "Nido de Condores”.

Everybody is very tired, but generally feels good.

Here is a list of those who stood on the highest peak of South America:

Victor Bobok - guide
Oleg Vorobyev
Valery Kurennoy
Andrew Levin
Anton Ostapenko
Andrew Podolyan
Tatiana Stukalova
Alexei Sushkov
Stanislav Shitkov

Congratulations to all !

Campanini Foundation saves lives

Aconcagua. Federico Campanini lost his life on Aconcagua in January 2009. Created in memory of Federico, The “El Fede” Campanini Foundation is dedicated to providing information, guidance, training and financial assistance to support ... read more

Federico Campanini lost his life on Aconcagua in January 2009. Created in memory of Federico, The “El Fede” Campanini Foundation is dedicated to providing information, guidance, training and financial assistance to support ongoing efforts to improve mountain rescue on Aconcagua and in other commercial climbing areas. 


elfede.org
Federico, or as he was fondly known, “El Fede,” Campanini was an Argentine climber and mountain guide whose passion for the mountains and for life was contagious. Federico found solace and purpose in the mountains and he loved sharing his knowledge and love of them with everyone who knew him; the lives of his family, friends, clients, and many others were changed forever by his presence.
Mission Statement:

The endeavor will not be easy, but it is possible through the support from those who share Federico’s love for the mountains.

Text by Amber Christiansen, widow of Federico


Off to move mountains…it moved me

I left for Aconcagua on Jan. 13 with the head park ranger of Aconcagua. On January 15 we arrived at Plaza de Mulas base camp (14,000 ft) and we stayed there for 4 days in order to acclimatize. It was quite an amazing time in which I talked to many people who participated in the rescue efforts of Fede and the Italians (more than 60 in total participated in some form, whether by melting snow or trying to save Fede's life). All were very moved and affected by the loss of Fede's life and I think my presence was a positive one, a reminder that something positive can come from a tragedy. We talked a lot and discussed ideas for the future and everyone learned how to use the equipment. Many, both locals and foreigners expressed interests to support rescue efforts. In addition, National Geographic was doing a documentary on Aconcagua and its search and rescue system. They interviewed me; hopefully this will also generate international interest, we shall see...

In four days time, there were four separate rescue efforts. In each one, the equipment that the foundation donated was used.

On January 19 we installed the first rescue cache at Nido de Condores (17,700 ft). That night, a Czech climber suffered from pulmonary edema and we used the oxygen from the cache.
On January 20 we left at 7a.m. from Nido de Condores to Independencia (21,000ft.) Another group went to La Canaleta (22,000ft). After we installed the cache at Independencia we spent an hour and a half resting and talking about life. One hour later we received news that a woman collapsed at the summit of Aconcagua. The same group of individuals that had installed the rescue cache at La Canaleta helped the woman by using a litter and oxygen that they had put in the cache just one hour before. We had already started descending when we heard the call for help. We waited at Camp Berlin (about 19,000ft) for three hours to help them with the descent of the woman in the litter. By the time they arrived it was dark and ten of us (me being the only woman) took turns carrying the sled. It was a crazy time, and I kept focusing on the woman's eyes, to make sure she didn't close them. She was French and didn't speak any Spanish and very little English. She was scared and I tried to soothe her fears. When we got to Nido she was put on oxygen and then they descended her to Plaza de Mulas in a litter where she was evacuated the following day in a helicopter.

My goal was to save one person's life with the rescue equipment and this occurred just one hour after they were installed.

The next day a woman fell while descending and broke her leg. Again the litter was used as well as a trauma kit for stabilizing the break. The first aid kits that were stored at Nido de Condores were never stored, they were used every day, one incident after another.

I cannot explain life, or the events that occur, or why, when Fede was struggling for his life this equipment wasn't there, but it is there now, it is there now.

After this experience, and being there, and seeing the summit, I decided I needed to summit, to see what happened.

On January 23 at 12:00p.m. I summited Aconcagua. It was a struggle, I felt nauseas, but I understood the efforts of so many individuals who tried to save Fede.

Aconcagua is a community of people that share a love for the mountains, they take care of each other. Unfortunately they don't have the support of a government which should provide more resources.

So, on January 25 I began my return to the entrance to Aconcagua Provincial park. I decided I wanted to walk, even though I was offered a ride in the helicopter. It was difficult to leave, this community that works together and saw me as a hero. I am not a hero, but I did love Fede and I do also, love the mountains. I have learned more about the accident, and it continues to break my heart, but life must continue, it must.

T o understand death is to understand life.

There is still a lot of work to do but something is moving.

Please help support our cause to improve rescue efforts by sharing your thoughts and ideas in the forum or donating to our funds for rescue and training efforts.

Please contact amber@elfede.org for more information or questions on how to donate.

Chad Kellogg: Solo New Route on Aconcagua South Face…

Aconcagua. The line of Medicine Buddha (VI WI4 M4, 6,500'/1,980m of new ground) on the 3,000-meter south face of Aconcagua. Chad Kellogg joined the Messner Route and then the upper Argentinean Variation above the enormous serac band.  American ... read more

The line of Medicine Buddha (VI WI4 M4, 6,500'/1,980m of new ground) on the 3,000-meter south face of Aconcagua. Chad Kellogg joined the Messner Route and then the upper Argentinean Variation above the enormous serac band.

 American Chad Kellogg has soloed a dangerous new line on the famed south face of Aconcagua (6,962 m).

Red line - route of Kellog, blue - exit variant of Messner

 Kellogg traveled to Argentina with Rory Stark, aiming to acclimatize on the normal route on Aconcagua's north side and then attempt a line on the south face. Kellogg also wanted to try a one-day round trip on the normal route.

 As planned, Kellogg summited via the normal route on December 17, but Stark was stricken with pneumonia high on the mountain. With the help of some fellow Americans, they descended all the way to base camp that day, but Stark remained severely ill and had to be helicoptered to town for treatment; he eventually returned to his home in Alaska and recovered.

 On December 21, after repacking their gear and laying plans for a solo attempt on the south face, Kellogg hiked in to the base. A snowy winter and recent poor weather had plastered the face with ice and filled in crevasses, leaving it primed for a solo attempt. Kellogg scoped an unclimbed, avalanche-threatened line between the 1982 Slovenian Route to the left and the 1954 French Route (the original line on the face) on the right.

 That afternoon, he hiked up to the foot of the face to check conditions. In an account of the climb that he wrote after returning, Kellogg said, “I was able to determine that the initial bergschrund was crossable and that the initial WI5+ pitch was flowing heavily with water and was best avoided. It seemed as though the majority of the climb was 65°-70° snow and ice, punctuated with vertical ice steps. The real difficulty lay in surviving the ice avalanches from the frequent serac falls. It was the summer solstice, after all, and the temps had really heated up. I walked away from the base, and minutes later a huge avalanche swept the route and avalanche cone where I had just been standing. I tried to steel my nerves against the possibility that I could be swept into that debris at the base from any point on the route within the next 6,500 vertical feet. I told myself that this was my route and in eight hours I would be on it.”

 Kellogg hoped to complete the route in one long day, and he took minimal gear: a 30-meter, 8.1mm rope, about a dozen pieces of protection, and a stove and one fuel cartridge. He brought a few extra clothes and double boots for warmth, but no tent or sleeping bag. “I managed to rest for a few hours before I got up at 1:30 a.m.,” Kellogg wrote. “I centered myself with a meditation session before preparing for my departure.”

 Leaving his camp at 4 a.m., Kellogg approached the face, crossing two large crevasses and the bergschrund. After climbing some snow slopes to bypass the steep, wet ice pitch at the base, he traversed left and then downclimbed and rappelled a couple of hundred feet to reach the central gully, where snow and ice patches allowed faster progress-a good thing because of the enormous serac bands that loomed thousands of feet overhead.

 Several avalanches fell down the route as he climbed, but Kellogg escaped harm. Above a rock step and ice pitch, he reached a snow basin below the biggest serac band at ca. 6,000 meters. A very steep, short pitch of ice on the left side of the seracs gained the upper glacier. At this point Kellogg had climbed about 2,000 meters in 12 and a half hours and was on pace for a one-day ascent.

 After a rest stop to brew a couple of liters of water, he traversed right to join the Messner Route (Reinhold Messner's 1974 solo direct variation to the French Route), still hoping to finish the climb that night. However, he soon encountered unconsolidated sugar snow and began wallowing. At 11 p.m., realizing he'd never make it to the top that night in such conditions, he downclimbed to the glacier and prepared for an open bivy.

 

Serac avalanche sweeps the lower gully where Kellogg had ascended. Photo by Chad Kellogg

  

Kellogg shivered for seven hours in temperatures he estimated at 10°F (-12°C). When the sun hit him in the morning, he continued upward, finding some better snow along with vertical ice and mixed passages on the upper Messner Route. By early afternoon he was within 400 meters of the summit ridge, but the snow conditions were very poor again. He had run out of water in midmorning, and he had no more fuel to melt snow As he continued upward, Kellogg's hands got soaked in the wet snow, and by evening he realized he had frostbite on his right thumb. He radioed rangers and told them he was near the ridge, and they encouraged him to keep moving and said they'd meet him at the Nido de Cóndores ranger station (at 5,300 meters) as he descended.

 At 10 p.m., Kellogg reached the high ridgeline between Aconcagua's two summits. He had been on the face for 42 hours. In high winds, he struggled down the rocky ridge crest until he reached the Canaleta scree gully and joined the normal route. At 1:30 a.m., he made it down to the ranger station, where he finally could relax and get some hot drinks.

 

Kellogg called his new line Medicine Buddha (VI WI4 M4).

 A few days later, on December 29, after recovering from his effort and getting treatment for his frostbitten thumb, Kellogg began an attempt on a one-day climb: a 50-mile round trip with 14,000 feet (4,275m) of elevation gain. He ran and climbed as far as Berlin Camp at 5,950 meters in 9 hours 15 minutes, but there he discovered that someone had broken into his gear cache and stolen the boots and equipment he needed for the summit. The speed attempt was over.

 Dates of New Route Ascent: December 22-24, 2009

 

 Sources: Chad Kellogg, American Alpine Journal

Kilimanjaro was climbed by our team.

Kilimanjaro. According to the 7 Summits Club leader and guide of the current expedition to Kilimanjaro, Alexander Abramov, today 9 members of the 7 Summits Club in 07.30 at the morning reached the highest point of Africa - Uhuru Peak ... read more

According to the 7 Summits Club leader and guide of the current expedition to Kilimanjaro, Alexander Abramov, today 9 members of the 7 Summits Club in 07.30 at the morning reached the highest point of Africa - Uhuru Peak (Kilimanjaro massif).

Congratulations!

Romanian teenager Popescu conquers Oceania’s highest summit

Carstensz Pyramid.   Romanian 15-year-old Crina Popescu, a member of the Altitudine Sports Club of Rasnov, on January 24 climbed the Carstensz Pyramid, at 4,884 m Oceania’s highest mountain summit located in Indonesa, becoming the world’s ... read more

 

Romanian 15-year-old Crina Popescu, a member of the Altitudine Sports Club of Rasnov, on January 24 climbed the Carstensz Pyramid, at 4,884 m Oceania’s highest mountain summit located in Indonesa, becoming the world’s youngest alpinist to climb this mountain.
The previous record was held by US Samatha Larson, who ascended the peak in 2007, at 18. Cristina Popescu is also the first Romanian ever to climb this peak.

The Australia-Oceania 2010 five-week expedition mounted by the Altitudine Sport Club set off to conquer three summits: Kosciuszka, Australia’s highest; Giluwe, at 4,368 the highest volcano of Oceania, and Oceania’s highest summit Carstensz Pyramid. Popescu managed to climb all the three peaks during the expedition.

Popescu has over the past three years conquered four of the world’s Seven Summits – Aconcagua, Kilimanjaro, Elbrus and Carstensz Pyramid and five of the world’s Seven Volcanoes – Elbrus, Ojos Del Salado, Damavand, Kilimanjaro and Giluwe.

The success of her feats has brought the young mountain climber one step closer to achieving her dream of becoming the world’s youngest climber ever to successfully walk this route.
Popescu will continue her expeditions in the second part of the year, when she sets to conquer two important peaks of the two routes: Pico de Orizaba of Mexico, at 5,636m the highest volcano in North America, and Denali, at 6,194 m the highest peak of Alaska, Altitudine reports in a press release ahead of their return home....

 

Alexander Abramov went to Africa.

Kilimanjaro. Recently started a new expedition of 7 Summits Club to the highest point of Africa - Kilimanjaro. The expedition was led by 7 Summits Club’s leader Alexander Abramov. Before climbing members of expedition met with the most famous ... read more

Recently started a new expedition of 7 Summits Club to the highest point of Africa - Kilimanjaro. The expedition was led by 7 Summits Club’s leader Alexander Abramov. Before climbing members of expedition met with the most famous representatives of the African fauna: lions, tigers, leopards, giraffes and elephants.
We wish good luck!

New seven Summits Club's expedition to Aconcagua.

Aconcagua. Feb. 1. Today started new expedition of 7 Summits Club to the highest point of South America – mount Aconcagua. It is the fifth expedition in our Club to Aconcagua in this season. All previous expeditions were very successful. More ... read more

Feb. 1. Today started new expedition of 7 Summits Club to the highest point of South America – mount Aconcagua. It is the fifth expedition in our Club to Aconcagua in this season. All previous expeditions were very successful. More than 30 people reached Aconcagua summit with our Club in this season.
Good luck and good weather!

Our team has climbed Aconcagua.

Aconcagua. February, 2. This evening we had a call by satphone from 7 Summit Club guide Max Bogatyrev. He reported that yesterday all members of the 7 Summit Club expedition to Aconcagua successfully reached the summit. On the top of Aconcagua ... read more

February, 2. This evening we had a call by satphone from 7 Summit Club guide Max Bogatyrev. He reported that yesterday all members of the 7 Summit Club expedition to Aconcagua successfully reached the summit. On the top of Aconcagua (February 1) were:

Klopack Joseph

Arefiev Andrey

Arefiev Sergey

Zogrobyan Arman

Sadikov Vadim

Sadikov Grigory

Shapovalov Igor

Bogatyrev Maxim - 7 Summits Club Guide

We warmly congratulate them!!!

Nanga Parbat film restarts row over Messner brothers' fatal climb

 A film retelling mountaineer Reinhold Messner's legendary ascent of Nanga Parbat, in which his younger brother was killed, has reignited a bitter mountaineering row and prompted fellow climbers to attack as "false" the version of ... read more

 A film retelling mountaineer Reinhold Messner's legendary ascent of Nanga Parbat, in which his younger brother was killed, has reignited a bitter mountaineering row and prompted fellow climbers to attack as "false" the version of events being portrayed on the screen.

 A group of climbers who accompanied Messner, now 65, and his brother Günther on the 1970 expedition have criticised the makers of Nanga Parbat for telling only one side of the story – and have threatened legal action.

 The film, by the director Josef Vilsmaier, is being advertised under the slogan "two brothers, one mountain, their fate" and promises to reconstruct the events when Günther disappeared after apparently following Reinhold down Nanga Parbat in Pakistan, the ninth highest mountain in the world and one of the most treacherous to climb. From the start the film, much of which was shot on location, makes clear that it is telling the story "from the point of view of Reinhold Messner".

While Messner has always said that Günther, then 23, was buried by an avalanche, others on the trip claim that the older brother abandoned his altitude-sick sibling so that he could tackle alone the uncharted western side, the Diamir face.

 The discovery of Günther's remains on the Diamir face in 2005 gave support to his brother's version of events, but did little to quell tensions between expedition members.

Official trailer

 

 One, Gerhard Baur, said the film was biased and regretted that he and others on the expedition had not been consulted.

 "It is a constructed story, and is not the truth about Nanga Parbat … it is presented as if it were a documentary when it doesn't reflect the facts," he told the German magazine Spiegel.

 "The film repeats Messner's claim that … out of pure necessity he decided to descend via the Diamir face and that Günther was buried by an avalanche … I still don't accept this version of events … I was present three times when Messner spoke with great enthusiasm about his desire to tackle the Diamir face, saying that it would be the next leap in the world of alpinism."

 Baur said he felt "wounded" by the fact that the rest of the team stands accused of failing to offer their help to the younger brother. "It hurts a lot that those from the team who are no longer with us haven't got the chance to defend themselves."

 The expedition leader Karl Maria Herrligkoffer's son accused Messner of insulting his father's memory and said he was considering taking legal action.

 "I don't recognise my father as he's been portrayed in the film, and because he's dead he cannot defend himself," said Klaus Herrligkoffer, criticising the depiction of him as a tyrannical leader who failed to help the Messner brothers.

 Max von Kienlin, a fellow climber and former Messner friend, said: "The film is a falsification, adding things that didn't happen, and leaving out what did happen."

 Messner told German climbing magazine Klettern the film was intended to "trigger strong emotions in the viewers".

 

He said: "I personally didn't need to make the film, but it was important for my family. We're not trying to make a story about heroism, rather I wanted to ask critical questions of myself of what happened on Nanga Parbat."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jan/19/nanga-parbat-film-controversy

 

Letter from Ang Tshering Sherpa, president Nepal Mountaineering Association

It has been a very busy few months for me and my family. In a recent development on the dispute of Nepal Mountaineering Association, the Government of Nepal has posted me once again as the President of NMA until such time that another ... read more

It has been a very busy few months for me and my family. In a recent development on the dispute of Nepal Mountaineering Association, the Government of Nepal has posted me once again as the President of NMA until such time that another election can be held and the position passed on. The Ministers' Cabinet of the Government of Nepal held a special meeting at Kala Patthar Plateau (5,542 m) on December 4th near Mt. Everest Base Camp, to raise awareness about the impact of Climate Change on Nepal. Nepalese Prime Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal and 23 other ministers attended the meeting, where a 10 point ‘Declaration’ was released which calls for concerted actions to minimize adverse effects of climate change in the Himalayan region

The meeting held at such a high altitude was substantial in drawing attention to the dangers of climate change and global warming on the Himalayas, days before UN negotiations on climate change in Copenhagen. This meeting gained worldwide media coverage and it showed the commitment of the Nepalese Government towards the burning issues of Climate Change and the mountain environment.

Following this, Summiteers Summit to Save the Himalayas was organized by the Government of Nepal in Copenhagen to mark the International Mountain Day on December 11, 2009. Led by honorable Minister for Forestry and Soil conservation, Mr. Deepak Bohora, this rally was an accompanying event in the 15th session of UNFCCC conference. The objective of this program was to draw attention of international community towards the Himalayas and the impacts of Climate Change on the Himalayas so that the important role of the Himalaya mountain region in regulating global climate regime can be well recognized by all.
Government ministers and mountaineers from Nepal in Copenhagen (image: Hank Hwang, Chinese Taipei Mountaineering Association)


This event was a humble request to the world community to pay greater attention to the challenges of climate change in the mountains and to value their unique contribution to the global ecology. Also please visit :
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/video/2009/dec/10/copenhagen-sherpa-himalayas

On behalf of the Government of Nepal, as President of Nepal Mountaineering Association and Union of Asian Alpine Association, I had the great pleasure to co-ordinate the gathering of International Mountaineers from all over the world in Copenhagen for this event. A large number of people (estimated between 900-1200 by the Copenhagen police), including 35 renowned Nepalese Mt.Everest summiteers, many international Mt.Everest and 8,000 m peaks summiteers, celebrities of International repute, Nepalese living abroad and supporters from all over the world with a concern for global climate change gathered and marched together in the streets of Copenhagen to highlight the challenges faced by the Himalaya in the context of global warming.

The event also included other activities such as the “Himalaya- Changing Landscapes” photo exhibition; a cultural program by a Sherpa cultural group and a Danish band; speeches by mountaineering leaders and icons and the issue declaration to Save the Himalayas. Nepal Mountaineering Association along with several organizations such as Nepal’s National Trust for Nature Conservation, ICIMOD, WWF, Nepal Tourism Board, the World Bank, Danish Embassy, Union of Asian Alpine Association, ESA, and NRN joined hands with the government to launch this special event.

I thank all the participants for their concern and support towards saving the Himalayas and the mountain environment.

Just ahead of the Climate Change talks in Copenhagen, my son Dawa Steven along with renowned mountaineer Apa Sherpa, 19th times Mt.Everest Summiteers went on a ‘European Expedition.” On expedition they visited 10 major European cities. They attended various events and exhibitions, participated in many talks, gave lectures and presentations, met high- profile politicians and celebrities, and spoke to the media delivering the message from Himalayan communities who are on the front line to face the impacts of climate change. The ‘European Expedition’ was part of the Climate for Life campaign of WWF and directed to raise the profile of the Himalayas in the global climate debate. Dawa Steven and Apa are both Ambassadors for the Climate for Life campaign.

Starting from Prague, Dawa Steven and Apa passed through Brno, Bratislava, London, Viterbo, Gland, Chamonix, Vienna, Brussels, Paris and finally to Copenhagen. In London, Dawa Steven spoke to Members of Parliament at Westminster. In Gland (Switzerland), Dawa and Apa met Jim Leape, Director General of WWF International and were awarded “Leaders of a Living Planet” the Highest award for conservation given by WWF. Dawa Steven also informed the Austrian President about Nepal’s problems in the face of Climate Change and handed over the summit rocks to the President. Similarly in Brussels (Belgium), Dawa Steven spoke at a Climate Change rally to 13,000 people and participated in round table talks at the European Parliament where members of Parliament, South Asian Nation Ambassadors and officials of the European Commission were present. In Paris, they handed over the Prime Minister’s Letter to the Chief of Protocol of the President’s Office. Also please visit:
http://www.climate4life.org

Looking forward to an exciting New Year, we also have many programs planned.

Mt. Dhaulagiri Golden Jubilee will be celebrated on 28 May 2010 and on the same day Save the Himalaya Conference will be held. On 29 May 2010, various programs will be organized to celebrate International Everest Day.

Conforming to the success of Imja Tsho Action Event 2009, Dawa Steven Sherpa and his iDEAS team will organize Imja Tsho Action Event 2010 this year also on 10 June 2010. The run titled Beat the GLOF Action Run will start from Imja Lake (5010 m) and end at Khumjung Village covering a total distance of about 35 kilometers. Following the Action Run on 11 June 2010 will be Save the Himalaya – Khumbu Festival at Khumjung Village to focus on the mountain communities, the mountain environment and the impacts on them due to climate change. Also please visit www.theuiaa.org/act_mountain_protection.html

Eco Everest Expedition 2010 will take place this year with a special program. This year Dawa Steven and his Eco Everest Expedition team has planned to collect and bring down garbage from the Mountain, including at altitudes as high as 8000 m and above. The plan is to create a team of 10 Sherpas to clean up garbage and debris from such high altitudes. This year’s expedition targets to bring down 1000 kgs of debris from high altitude (above Camp 2) and 6000 kgs of debris from Camp 2 and below.

I once again hope to receive your support and encouragement for our efforts in the New Year.

Best Wishes,

Ang Tshering Sherpa

Founder Chairman
www.asian-trekking.com

7 Summits Club - January's expedition

South Pole. The New Yew started with the growth of activity. A record number of 7 Summits Club's expeditions held in January. All of them were successful. Here's a summary of them: 1. Expedition to the highest point of Africa - Kilimanjaro. Group as a ... read more

The New Yew started with the growth of activity.

A record number of 7 Summits Club's expeditions held in January. All of them were successful.

Here's a summary of them:
1. Expedition to the highest point of Africa - Kilimanjaro. Group as a whole has risen to the top.
2. In January There were three expeditions to the highest point of South America - Aconcagua. In two expeditions all participants reached the summit. In the third expedition 11 out of 12 people reached the.
3. New Year's expedition to the highest point of Australia - Kosciuszko. All people reached the top. Also as part of the expedition was an active motor race on New Zealand.
4. Expedition to the volcanoes of Ecuador. The whole team summited the volcanoes Chimborazo and Cotopaxi.
5. Closing of the traditional 7 Summits Club expedition to Antarctica. One group had reached the South Pole, passing more than 100 kilometers. A second group climbed to the highest point in Antarctica - Vinson Massif. And the third group to passed more than 300 km from Base Camp Vinson Massif to sea level.

Seven summits of Martyna Wojciechowska

Carstensz Pyramid.  January 17, 2010 Polish journalist and explorer, Martyna Wojciechowska went to great air travel on the route: Warszawa - Amsterdam - Kuala Lumpur - Jakarta - Makassar - Biak - Nabire (New Guinea). Austrian guide and a physician Robert ... read more

 January 17, 2010 Polish journalist and explorer, Martyna Wojciechowska went to great air travel on the route: Warszawa - Amsterdam - Kuala Lumpur - Jakarta - Makassar - Biak - Nabire (New Guinea). Austrian guide and a physician Robert Miller was her partner. Martyna met him in Antarctica a year ago. They chose to travel to the base camp helicopter flight from  Nabira. January 20 in this town there was a conflict with the local people, which demanded to abandon the helicopter and move on with a caravan of porters. Martyna, perhaps, would not mind, but they had not time.

 Local residents began blocking  helicopter, but did not show persistence .. January 22, at 5 a.m.  helicopter evacuated the command to the base camp of the Pyramid Carstensz. Under the plan climbers has to stay two days there for acclimatization. But Robert insisted to go immediately. While the weather was good.

   The climb started went well. But on the crest  the weather worsened. Martyna has no big experience in rock climbing, so it was hard. As a result, the amount of emotion and adrenaline was beyond measure. "I wanted to lie down and die."  Thanks Robert everything ended well. The entire climb from camp to camp took 10 hours.

 The program "Seven Summits" is completed,  no doubt -  then will be two poles on skis.

 Martyna Wojciechowska is 35 years old. She has a degree in Economics and has her principal place of work - Editor in Chief of the Polish editions of NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC. Martyna  worked a lot on television, where it participates in different projects and has long been a television presenter.

 Martyna traveled to 70 countries, participated in rally etc. In 2002, Wojciechowska started mountaineering practice climbing Mont Blanc. In 2003 -  Kilimanjaro. After the idea of climbing Mount Everest was born. For training, Martyna ascended  Aconcagua in early 2006. In May 2006, there was a greatest success at the highest peak of the planet.

 In 2007 – she added McKinley and Mount Elbrus. After a break for the birth of h daughter: in 2009 – Mount Vinson and then Carstensz.

 

  Congratulations!

  www.martynawojciechowska.pl/

 

 In preparation for the expedition to Everest it was used stamp "model for Playboy." Martyna actually filmed and published on  pages of the famous magazine. But she has always been a business woman, making an excellent career.

 

On Elbrus

Congratulations to Utah boy - the youngster Sevensummiter

Vinson.   A 17-year-old boy from Utah has reportedly become the youngest person to climb the highest mountains on each of the seven continents, after reaching the peak of Antarctica's Mount Vinson on Tuesday. Johnny Collinson began his quest ... read more

 

A 17-year-old boy from Utah has reportedly become the youngest person to climb the highest mountains on each of the seven continents, after reaching the peak of Antarctica's Mount Vinson on Tuesday.

Johnny Collinson began his quest on Jan. 19, 2009, on the summit of Argentina's Aconcagua, completing the feat on the same day just one year later.

Known to the climbing world as the Seven Summits, the group of mountains include Alaska's Denali, Elbrus in Russia, Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, Indonesia's Carstensz Pyramid, and Mount Everest.

According to his Website, Collinson's father is a member of the Ski Patrol at the Snowbird Ski Resort in Cottonwood Canyon, Utah, and taught Johnny how to ski at age 2. Two years later the young Collinson climbed Washington's Mount Rainier, the highest peak in the contiguous United States.

Mark Gunlogson of Mountain Madness, the adventure travel company that orgainzed the Mount Vinson expedition, says Collinson's year-long quest likely cost in the neighborhood of $150,000.

Fewer than 250 people have conquered the Seven Summits since mountaineer Richard Bass started the challenge in 1985, but like many things in the world of climbing, it is not without its share of controversy.

Bass' list of the Seven Summits included Australia's Mount Kosciuszko in lieu of Carstensz Pyramid, which he considered to be in Asia. A year later a rival climber Reinhold Messner argued that Australia and Indonesia are actually both part of a larger continent called Oceana, and that the Indonesian peak, at 16,024 feet more than twice as high as Kosciuszko, is the true highest summit in the region.

By the measure of the Bass list it was a resident of Malibu, California named Johnny Strange who is the youngest to climb the Seven Summits, reaching the top of Everest in May of 2009 at age 17, at the same time that Collinson was on the mountain. Strange climbed Mount Vinson when he was 12 years old.

No word if either of the young men plan to go after those eighth peaks for good measure, but they'd better watch their backs. According to travel website Gadling.com, a 13-year old boy named Jordan Romero has climbed five of the summits and is planning to take on Everest and Vinson this year.

Our group at the top of Aconcagua

Aconcagua.   Yesterday, the group of 7 Summits Club under the leadership of our guide, Maxim Bogatyrev went to Mendoza. Maxim has sent details of the ascent and a picture  from the summit.    Acclimatization was held by the scheme ... read more

  Yesterday, the group of 7 Summits Club under the leadership of our guide, Maxim Bogatyrev went to Mendoza. Maxim has sent details of the ascent and a picture  from the summit.

   Acclimatization was held by the scheme BC - Camp 4900 (Canada). The second night was at the Condor 5600. Then we went to rest in the base camp. And after two nights we went into the assault. The weather was variable. One day, an incredible for these places amount of snow has fallen. The level of snow was - on his knee. The team started out at 4 a.m. One hour later, our hands - feet began to freeze. I was forced to give trental to my comrades.  But we keep up a temp. At 1 p.m., the group in dense column reached  the top. Without of Ilya Petrunichev, who heroically came to the 6000. That he was very surprised all. After all, he was ill in the base camp . Local guides say that they never had such a strong team. All at 6000m!

   Ilya was waiting for us in 6000 for two nights. January 16, 2010 on the birthday of the Club Captain Alexander Abramov 7 Summits, we were at the top.

 

 

Here are the names of those who that day stood at the top:

Borodkin Peter

Vol'per Vladimir

Zagorskaya Anna

Zamalaev Paul

Kornev Mihail

Kornienko Konstantin

Kornienko Svetlana

Nadvodnyuk Vadim

Turovsky Mikhail

Chmel Catherine

 and guide Bogatyrev Maxim

 

7 SUMMITS TO SEALEVEL WORLD RECORD of NOEL HANNA.

South Pole. Our friend and partner Noel Hanna, Northern Ireland based adventure sports trainer and endurance athlete finished his project named 7 SUMMITS TO SEALEVEL. It means climbing Seven summits of the world's highest peaks, followed by seven ... read more

Our friend and partner Noel Hanna, Northern Ireland based adventure sports trainer and endurance athlete finished his project named 7 SUMMITS TO SEALEVEL. It means climbing Seven summits of the world's highest peaks, followed by seven arduous and top-speed descents to Sea Level. Almost five years, seven continents, thousands of column inches in media coverage - and one goal in sight, a new entry in the Guinness Book of Records.

 

Noel Hanna, 42 is no stranger to nature's extreme challenges. He has competed in many of the world's most grueling endurance races such as, The Marathon Des Sables, Deathvalley 135, Discovery Eco-challenges and Himalayan 100 miler to name just a few.

For Noel Hanna, a man to whom challenge is a familiar friend, the quest was to go much further than previous expeditions - and add a dimension to the Seven Summits Challenge that would test, push, demand and enthrall: to follow each summit expedition with a race to Sea Level by man-powered means and accompanied by an observer from the Guinness Book of Records.

A seasoned mountaineer and endurance athlete, who is also a consultant advising endurance event organizers on course design and expedition logistics, Noel began his challenge in 2005 from Aconcagua.

In spring 2005 Noel Hanna and his wife Lynn joint an expedition of Everest organized by 7 Summits Club and led by Alex Abramov. Despite a setback on his first ascent Everest in 2005, when an eyesight problem forced him to turn back just one mile from the summit, he has relentlessly pursued.

Next year, again with Alex Abramov, they return to Everest North Face. 21st May 2006 he leave camp 2 at 0130 hrs for summit climb. Arrive at summit at 0945 hrs.

Except of his 7 SUMMITS TO SEALEVEL program Noel and Lynn Hanna joint 7 Summits Club for following project:

2009 Climbed to the summit of Mt.Everest 8848mts ( south side).

2009 Climbed to summit of Mt. Elbrus 5642 mts Russia.

On December 2009 Noel left for a 7 week expedition in Antacrtica with a team of 7 Summits Club. 22th of December 2009.Noel with our guide Victor Bobok has climbed Mt.Vinson 4897 mts After some days in Christmas they started for almost 300 km skiing to the sea at Hercules inlet. It takes 8 days to finish 4th of December in Patriot Hills.

 

Noel Hanna and his wife Lynn on Elbrus

2006 after Everest

 

With Nikolay Cherny on Everest 2009

Dec 09/Jan 10 : MOUNT VINSON,

Antarctica

Autumn 2008 : CARSTENSZ PYRAMID,

Australasia, Indonesia

Descent to sea level, Nabire in 11 Days 9 hrs 5 mins

Jul 2007 : ELBRUS,

Europe, Russia

Descent to sea level, the Black Sea in 4 days, 22hrs, 50m.

May 2007 : DENALI,

North America, Alaska

Descent to sea level, the South Pacific Ocean in 10 days, 20 hrs, 30m.

Dec 2006 :KILIMANJARO,

Africa, Tanzania

Descent to sea level, the Indian Ocean in 37hrs, 44m.

May 2006 EVEREST,

Asia, Tibet - Nepal

Descent to sea level, the Bay of Bengal in 16 days, 23hrs, 15m.

Jan 2005 ACONCAGUA,

South America, Argentina

Descent to sea level, the Pacific Ocean in 28hrs, 23m.

Link with UCF:

Noel is linking this final leg of his Guinness Book of Records summit to sea level challenge attempt to his ongoing fundraising for UCF. He will be building on the total raised for the charity by the Personal Everest project.

Noel expedition log onto www.7summits2sealevel.com

Victor Bobok came to Moscow from Antarctica

South Pole. Today January 12 morning Victor Bobok came to Moscow from Antarctica. And already at lunch time he appeared in the office of 7 Summits Club. Victor told fascinating stories about his adventures on the White Continent. Recall that in last 45 ... read more

Today January 12 morning Victor Bobok came to Moscow from Antarctica. And already at lunch time he appeared in the office of 7 Summits Club. Victor told fascinating stories about his adventures on the White Continent.

Recall that in last 45 days Victor Bobok made:

- With the first group (Dmitry Moskalev, Vladimir Lande, Yuri Taydakov, Igor Grishkov) go skiing more than 100 km and reach the South Pole

- With the second group (Igor Grishkov, Andrew Filkov, Patrick Sain and Noel Hanna) ascended to the highest point in Antarctica - Vinson Massif (4897m)

- With the third group (Noel Hanna and Dr. Derrick) went skiing more than 200 km from Vinson at sea level (Hercules Inlet).

- And then traveled two days by bus through the entire Argentina (from Punta Arenas to Buenos Aires), harrying  to fly home.

Just two weeks later Victor again fly to South America in order to lead an expedition 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Summits!!!!

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!!!! From 7 Summits Club! We wish you new great summits in new year with us!!!! read more

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!!!!

From 7 Summits Club!

We wish you new great summits in new year with us!!!!

Our group has climbed Mount Vinson!

South Pole. Seven Summits Club group has climbed the highest point of Antarctica - Mount Vinson. Today we received a sat call from the 7 Summits Club guide Victor Bobok. The whole team stood on the highest point of Antarctica. This call was so much joy ... read more

Seven Summits Club group has climbed the highest point of Antarctica - Mount Vinson.

Today we received a sat call from the 7 Summits Club guide Victor Bobok. The whole team stood on the highest point of Antarctica.

This call was so much joy and emotion. Everyone laughed and cried!

Later he told the details of ascent:

The weather was not perfect, so the guys had to go very quickly. At the top they made the necessary phone calls and photos (visibility less than 100 meters) and run down to the Camp 3.

 

We warmly congratulate all the climbers! We wish them a safe journey home!

 We would like to note that Noel Hanna (Ireland) completed project 7 Summits!


Vinson Massif - tomorrow will go to the top!

South Pole. Message from the participants of the expedition 7 Summits Club on the highest point in Antarctica - Vinson Massif: December 21 23:40 GMT Once again, hello! Group successfully "returned" to the Camp 3. The next day we planned assault on the ... read more

Message from the participants of the expedition 7 Summits Club on the highest point in Antarctica - Vinson Massif:

December 21 23:40 GMT Once again, hello! Group successfully "returned" to the Camp 3. The next day we planned assault on the highest point of Antarctica.

Forecast assumes clouds and a slight increase in wind. But, for now, guys do not care. They say that it in acceptable limits.

We wish them - good luck!!!

Vinson Massif 2009. We got to the third camp.

Vinson. News from January 20. 23:50 GMT guys went to the Camp 3, left there part of the food, tent and equipment. Tomorrow without luggage they will back to the camp 3. Today transition to the third camp is part of the acclimatization. The weather ... read more

News from January 20.

23:50 GMT guys went to the Camp 3, left there part of the food, tent and equipment. Tomorrow without luggage they will back to the camp 3. Today transition to the third camp is part of the acclimatization. The weather is still great, which may allow to think that the ascent to the summit of December 23-24



To the third camp