Navigation in the South Pole from Alex Abramov

Hello, 7 Summits Club! This is Alexander Abramov from Antarctica.  We are in good mood, today it was the second day of our trek on skis to the South Pole on the program "Last Degree". We passed 11 kilometers. The pace was low, and we ... read more

Hello, 7 Summits Club! This is Alexander Abramov from Antarctica.

 We are in good mood, today it was the second day of our trek on skis to the South Pole on the program "Last Degree". We passed 11 kilometers. The pace was low, and we are thinking how to get rid of the products to be easier to go. I am pleased that we are very clearly go directly to the South Pole. In fact, the issues of navigation very difficult: there are no landmarks and the sun goes around the circle.

In general. I figured out with difficulty, I realized what was wrong in navigation yesterday.

It's very interesting: go on an absolutely barren desert in the southern hemisphere near the pole. There, its navigation very difficult. 30 degrees of frost, GPS is not work constantly, we have to introduce any amendments and go on a compass. And by the sun and the shadows, depending on time of day. By the way is a very interesting option, a person works as a sundial.

In all calculations, was made global error. Today until 3 am I thought, what is the reason and I finally managed to understand. Then, in Moscow, I'll tell you.

All kiss and hug (girls), shake a paw (boys)! Bye!

 

Valery Rozov and Red Bull Antarctica: Out of this World!

Famous Russian climber and BASE jumper Valery Rozov accomplished another milestone in his extraordinary career with the first ever jump from one of Antarctica's most inhospitable mountains. 'I felt like an astronaut in outer space' – ... read more

Famous Russian climber and BASE jumper Valery Rozov accomplished another milestone in his extraordinary career with the first ever jump from one of Antarctica's most inhospitable mountains.

'I felt like an astronaut in outer space' – Valery Rozov

At 2931 metres high, Mount Ulvetanna loomed frighteningly large as Rozov led an eight-strong team on Red Bull Antartica, bracing themselves for temperatures as low as -30°C.

After two weeks of preparation, Rozov climbed the face of the Ulvetanna together with his climbing colleague, Alexander Ruchkin, and mountain photographer, Thomas Senf. With his wingsuit on, he then flew for 45 seconds down the face of the mountain before opening his parachute and landing safely.

“It was like a journey to another planet," he said. “It’s deeply satisfying and has given me a long and lasting feeling of happiness."

Not one to rest on his laurels, however, Rozov was at it again soon afterwards.

With the plane home delayed, there was nothing else for it but to climb some more mountains as Rozov ascended the Tungespissen and the Holtanna – the only mountain in the Antarctic that had previously been used by a BASE jumper.

The Muscovite has attracted attention with his spectacular jumps in recent years, including a leap from the highest point of Mount Elbrus in Europe and more recently into an active volcano on Kamchatka in eastern Russia.

We're quite sure you won't have heard the last of Valery Rozov so bookmark redbull.com to find out about his next adventure.

by Chris Stanton

www.redbull.com