Valery, we are proud of you!

A report of the world record established by our friend Valera Rozov became the world news dated for 60-year anniversary of the firstMount Everestclimb. This message got on pages of the world press, the leading newspapers, the most popular ... read more

A report of the world record established by our friend Valera Rozov became the world news dated for 60-year anniversary of the firstMount Everestclimb. This message got on pages of the world press, the leading newspapers, the most popular news TV channels. Fine! We are proud that this new achievement of the outstanding Russian athlete was made within the 7 Summits Club Everest expedition under the leadership of Alex Abramov.

 

 

The images that tell the story of Valery Rozov's epic Mt Everest BASE jump

 

 

Red Bull:

The Russian extreme sports star Valery Rozov has made the highest ever BASE jump after leaping off Mt Everest from an altitude of 7,220m. Rozov made the jump on May 5th after almost two years of planning and training. Check out the video and the full story on our news page.

 

 

Valery Rozov group of 11 people was working in our expedition. Among them, his constant companions for the most extreme expeditions: Alexander Ruchkin, Thomas Senf and Sergey Krasko. The group was acclimated, has prepared the site for a touchdown and a shooting onNorth Rongbukglacier. Time was short, and Valery decided to jump at the first opportunity, on May 5.

Red Bull:

The ascent began on the Chinese side on the famous north route. Rozov had selected a spot for his leap at an altitude of 7,220 meters. It took him four days to climb from base camp to the jumping location, assisted by a team of four Sherpas.

At precisely 2:30 p.m. local time on May 5th, with temperatures at -18 Celsius, he jumped. Because the cliff at the top was not very high, the initial moment in the rarified high altitude air was extremely precarious.

Initial moment the most critical

Rozov needed more time than usual in the thin air to transition from freefall to flying. But after that he flew for nearly a full minute at speeds of about 200 km/h down the north face before landing safely on the Rongbuk glacier (5,950m).

 

 

Thank you, Red Bull !

Pictures by Denis Provalov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back in Kathmandu