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Our group was the first of the season, achieved the South Pole on skis !

South Pole. Today, December 14 at 6:00 p.m., Chilean time, our team (Alexander Orlov, Arvydas Avulis and Alexander Abramov) stood at the South Pole. This is a very happy event. People from American project "Ice Cube" greeted us very warmly on the ... read more

Today, December 14 at 6:00 p.m., Chilean time, our team (Alexander Orlov, Arvydas Avulis and Alexander Abramov) stood at the South Pole. This is a very happy event. People from American project "Ice Cube" greeted us very warmly on the Amundsen-Scott station. Everyone wanted to be photographed with us. We ourselves feel just as heroes.

The matter is, this year our team was the first reached the South Pole on skis. There were several aircraft excursion, when people just flew on trips. But on skis, we were the very first. The very first team in the world, in the winter season 2010 - 2011 years. Even the head of the station came out to meet us, although he usually does not. A group of Norwegians are going behind us. We will wait for them to fly together from the Pole to Union Glacier.

I hope that we will be in time to December 16, the guys should fly to Chili on IL-76. I'll stay to meet the new team, which will go to Mount Vinson. They are seven climbers from Russia and Ukraine.

What is very important: Arvydas became the first Lithuanian who came to the South Pole on skis. He unfolded the flag of Lithuania. It's really a remarkable event.

That's all, goodbye!

Alexander Abramov

Next day of Alex Abramov and Co

South Pole. Hello, 7 Summits Club! Today we finished  two-thirds part of the route. On the map, it left about 34 kms. We hope that tomorrow at the end of the day we will see on the horizon the Amundsen - Scott  station (located at ... read more

Hello, 7 Summits Club! Today we finished  two-thirds part of the route. On the map, it left about 34 kms. We hope that tomorrow at the end of the day we will see on the horizon the Amundsen - Scott  station (located at the South Pole). And day after tomorrow we'll have to go until  we arrive at the station. And we hope to fly away as soon as possible.

The weather is still good. The mood is excellent. Next time I'll send you a message when we will see the station.

Good luck! Good luck!

Alexander Abramov

Martina Navratilova on road to recovery as she leaves Nairobi hospital

Kilimanjaro. NAIROBI, December 12, 2010 - Martina Navratilova was today discharged from Nairobi Hospital, after making a good recovery from high altitude pulmonary oedema, an accumulation of fluid on the lungs, which she developed while climbing Mt. ... read more

NAIROBI, December 12, 2010 - Martina Navratilova was today discharged from Nairobi Hospital, after making a good recovery from high altitude pulmonary oedema, an accumulation of fluid on the lungs, which she developed while climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania to raise funds for the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation.

Martina's team of Laureus fundraisers, including German Paralympic Cyclist and Laureus Friend & Ambassador Michael Teuber and British Olympic badminton star Gail Emms reached the summit of 19,341ft Mt. Kilimanjaro yesterday despite battling severe weather conditions on the mountain. In total, 18 of the 27 fundraisers reached the top.

Martina was in high spirits on leaving the hospital, she said: "I am feeling much better and really pleased to be going home. I'd like to thank all the staff at Nairobi Hospital, who were wonderful, and really took care of me. The care I received during my three days in hospital was excellent.

"I have also been very touched by all the messages of support I have received over the past few days, and want to thank Laureus Academy Chairman Edwin Moses in particular, for making a very early morning call from Atlanta today to wish me well. It was great to chat to him, although I did joke that perhaps I have gone above and beyond the call of duty for Laureus on this occasion!

"It's great to know that the team have all returned safely from the mountain. I was so pleased to hear that so many of them made it to the summit despite the weather conditions, and I hope people reward their efforts by continuing to donate at http://www.laureus.com/"

Martina, who was leading the team of fundraisers, was forced to abandon the climb on day four. She was assisted down the mountain by porters and driven to nearby Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre for assessment, then, as a precaution, she was flown to Nairobi hospital for further tests which showed she was suffering from high altitude pulmonary oedema.

The climb began on Monday (Dec 6), and the Laureus team have had to face blizzards and torrential rain, which made progress extremely difficult throughout the week. The group of fundraisers safely reached the base of the mountain earlier today, and were delighted to hear news that Martina had been discharged from hospital.

German Paralympic Cyclist and Laureus Friend & Ambassador Michael Teuber, said: "It is fantastic to return to the news that Martina is getting much better and has been able to leave hospital. We were of course all very concerned for her and sad that she was forced to abandon the climb, but are delighted to know that she is now on the mend."

Martina Navratilova and Edwin Moses are members of the Laureus World Sports Academy, a unique association of 46 of the greatest living sporting legends who volunteer their time to act as global ambassadors for the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation. The mission of the Laureus Foundation is to utilise the power of sport to address social challenges, such as HIV/AIDS, substance abuse, crime, social exclusion, landmines awareness, violence, discrimination and health problems such as obesity through a global programme of sports-related community development initiatives. Currently there are almost 80 projects around the world supported by Laureus. Since its inception Laureus has raised over €35 million for sports-based projects which have helped to improve the lives of more than one million young people.

www.laureus.com/

 

Our expedition is already on halfway to the South Pole

South Pole. Hello, 7 Summits Club ! Today is a joyous event, we crossed the mark half of the route. This day we made 17, 5 km. We went in the accelerated tempo, and have not even tired. Now it is still 54 kilometers to the Amundsen-Scott station. We ... read more

Hello, 7 Summits Club ! Today is a joyous event, we crossed the mark half of the route. This day we made 17, 5 km. We went in the accelerated tempo, and have not even tired. Now it is still 54 kilometers to the Amundsen-Scott station. We are planning for 3 days to reach it, making 17-20 km per day. We hope that we will be in time for an airplane. On December 16, guys fly home, and I'll have to meet the next group at Union Glacier. These are our plans.

The Amundsen - Scott station usually is seen from 20 kms, so the last day, everybody goes in a straight line. Now we go not straight: by compass, by GPS, then the shadows, spending time for orientation. And then we will go in a straight line, it will be much easier.

The weather has now set a good idea. The weather was much worse when we throw away.

Good luck! Happy Weekend!

Leader of the expedition to the South Pole Alexander Abramov.

Our congratulations: Quebecer Franois Langlois conquers the Seven Summits

Elbrus. A member of 7 Summits Club François Langlois has reached the top of Antarctica's Vinson Massif, marking a decade challenge to climb the seven summits - the highest mountains of each of the seven continents: Mount Aconcagua, ... read more

A member of 7 Summits Club François Langlois has reached the top of Antarctica's Vinson Massif, marking a decade challenge to climb the seven summits - the highest mountains of each of the seven continents: Mount Aconcagua, Argentina, 2000; Mount Everest, Nepal, 2001, 2009; Mount Logan, Canada/Mount McKinley, U.S., 2003; Mount Elbrus, Russia, 2008; Carstensz Pyramid, Indonesia, 2008, Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, 2009; Vinson Massif, Antarctica, 2010. The glorious mountaineering quest was realised by Langlois with a noble purpose - to raise money for children's charities.

“I was born prematurely at 4 pounds, with underdeveloped lungs. I spent the first 5 weeks of my life in an incubator, dropped to 2 pounds and had multiple blood transfusions, jaundice, basically fighting off a whole slew of illnesses, fighting for my right to stay! 35 years have now gone by and with my fully developed lungs; I had the privilege to set foot a top of the world’s highest mountain; Everest. In those beautiful 15 minutes that I stood there, gazing at our amazing world, I made a promise; to help give back the gift I received. Recently, we found out that the pain in my chest was in fact a 2 pound benign tumour the size of a grapefruit on my left lung. It seems that I have carried this tumour with me since birth and climbed with it over the years. It was with me on Everest. As they removed the tumour, it burst, spilling a pint of fluid outside instead of in my lungs. I was spared from a pulmonary oedema that while on the Everest, would have been fatal. I enjoy with what eyes I see the world today!“ exclaims François Langlois.

Langlois supports, among other, Fondation Centre de cancerologie Charles-Bruneau, Child Haven International, The Montreal Children’s Hospital (McGill University Health Centre), The Make-A-Wish Foundation and World Vision.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good news from Australia, our expedition climbed Mount Kosciuszko

According to information received, 11 December 2010 a team of climbers of the project "Russia at the top of the world" under leadership of Kazbek Khamitsaev in 12 a.m. on Australian time summited Mount Kosciuszko. We hope that all members ... read more

According to information received, 11 December 2010 a team of climbers of the project "Russia at the top of the world" under leadership of Kazbek Khamitsaev in 12 a.m. on Australian time summited Mount Kosciuszko. We hope that all members of the team have reached the top of the Green continent, including guides 7 Summits Club of Victor Bobok and Olga Rumyantseva. We will wait for the information from them.

 

Agency Osinform:

"Despite the fact that this summit is three times smaller than our last mountain - Aconcagua (6962 m) the ascent was not easy. A strong wind blew against. However, we should remember that our climb is dedicated to a very important event in our country - the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi in 2014, after us watch our fellow citizens, and it gave us strength. As a result, in 12 hours 14 minutes, we stood at the top of Kosciuszko, "- said by telephone Kazbek Khamitsaev.

Mount Kosciuszko is the third mountain climbers conquered in the project. Successful expeditions have already made to the highest peak in Africa, Mount Kilimanjaro (5895 m, 2008) and the highest point in South America Mount Aconcagua (6962 m, 2010). In 2011 we plan to climb was Mount McKinley (6,138 m, Alaska), 2012 - Vinson Massif (4,892 m, Antarctica), in 2013 - Mr. Everest (8848 m, Nepal), and the day of the Olympics in 2014 . - to climb Mount Elbrus (5642 m, Caucasus), with the Olympic flame.

 

 

Alexander Abramov from the camp 3, we like this program

South Pole. Hello! Leader of the expedition to the South Pole, Alexander Abramov. Today, 10 th December, we went 6 hours, again we made about 11 kilometers. The weather was not very good: a strong wind, minus thirty. The main problem is that you can ... read more

Hello! Leader of the expedition to the South Pole, Alexander Abramov. Today, 10 th December, we went 6 hours, again we made about 11 kilometers. The weather was not very good: a strong wind, minus thirty. The main problem is that you can not stay long during a day just to eat and drink tea. Literally 2-3 minutes and that’s all ... you're cool and must go to escape, mask misted.

In general everything is all right. We go to bed now, putting the third camp. Given the point where we landed, we have to go another 70 km. But we are not upset, we like this fact. Many thanks to those who came up with this program, "Last Degree". Excellent opportunity to feel like a man, if you're a man.

I would recommend it to try. And you'll never forget this trip.

All ... bye! Bye! Until tomorrow.

Navigation in the South Pole from Alex Abramov

South Pole. Hello, 7 Summits Club! This is Alexander Abramov from Antarctica.  We are in good mood, today it was the second day of our trek on skis to the South Pole on the program "Last Degree". We passed 11 kilometers. The pace was low, and we ... read more

Hello, 7 Summits Club! This is Alexander Abramov from Antarctica.

 We are in good mood, today it was the second day of our trek on skis to the South Pole on the program "Last Degree". We passed 11 kilometers. The pace was low, and we are thinking how to get rid of the products to be easier to go. I am pleased that we are very clearly go directly to the South Pole. In fact, the issues of navigation very difficult: there are no landmarks and the sun goes around the circle.

In general. I figured out with difficulty, I realized what was wrong in navigation yesterday.

It's very interesting: go on an absolutely barren desert in the southern hemisphere near the pole. There, its navigation very difficult. 30 degrees of frost, GPS is not work constantly, we have to introduce any amendments and go on a compass. And by the sun and the shadows, depending on time of day. By the way is a very interesting option, a person works as a sundial.

In all calculations, was made global error. Today until 3 am I thought, what is the reason and I finally managed to understand. Then, in Moscow, I'll tell you.

All kiss and hug (girls), shake a paw (boys)! Bye!

 

Valery Rozov and Red Bull Antarctica: Out of this World!

Famous Russian climber and BASE jumper Valery Rozov accomplished another milestone in his extraordinary career with the first ever jump from one of Antarctica's most inhospitable mountains. 'I felt like an astronaut in outer space' – ... read more

Famous Russian climber and BASE jumper Valery Rozov accomplished another milestone in his extraordinary career with the first ever jump from one of Antarctica's most inhospitable mountains.

'I felt like an astronaut in outer space' – Valery Rozov

At 2931 metres high, Mount Ulvetanna loomed frighteningly large as Rozov led an eight-strong team on Red Bull Antartica, bracing themselves for temperatures as low as -30°C.

After two weeks of preparation, Rozov climbed the face of the Ulvetanna together with his climbing colleague, Alexander Ruchkin, and mountain photographer, Thomas Senf. With his wingsuit on, he then flew for 45 seconds down the face of the mountain before opening his parachute and landing safely.

“It was like a journey to another planet," he said. “It’s deeply satisfying and has given me a long and lasting feeling of happiness."

Not one to rest on his laurels, however, Rozov was at it again soon afterwards.

With the plane home delayed, there was nothing else for it but to climb some more mountains as Rozov ascended the Tungespissen and the Holtanna – the only mountain in the Antarctic that had previously been used by a BASE jumper.

The Muscovite has attracted attention with his spectacular jumps in recent years, including a leap from the highest point of Mount Elbrus in Europe and more recently into an active volcano on Kamchatka in eastern Russia.

We're quite sure you won't have heard the last of Valery Rozov so bookmark redbull.com to find out about his next adventure.

by Chris Stanton

www.redbull.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The team of Russia at the tops of the world" starts to Australia

Today, on the night, a new 7 Summits Club expedition to Australia and New Zealand started. Two main guides of the Club Olga Rumyantsev and Victor Bobok gone in the direction of Australia. Now we are sitting in Dubai. Before boarding a plane ... read more

Today, on the night, a new 7 Summits Club expedition to Australia and New Zealand started. Two main guides of the Club Olga Rumyantsev and Victor Bobok gone in the direction of Australia. Now we are sitting in Dubai. Before boarding a plane to Sydney we have a few hours left and we are not to lose time, organizing a small mobile office. No difference from our native office in Moscow, the usual attributes - laptops, guitars etc...

Best regards!

Victor Bobok, Olga Rumyantsev.

The main part of the expedition (15) flies to Australia tonight.

 

 

“Russia at the tops of the world" expedition team consists of 15 climbers from North Ossetia plus two guides of 7 Summits Club.

The idea of this campaign was born almost two years ago, its initiator famous Russia climber, chairman of the Federation of North Ossetia, Kazbek Khamitsaev. In 2008, the project began, first summit to climb was Mount Kilimanjaro. The next goal was South American highest peak – Aconcagua (February 2010). The 2010 is also scheduled to climb the summit of Mount Kosciuszko - the highest point of Australia. In 2011 Russia climbers going up on Mount McKinley in North America, in 2012 - on Mount Vinson in Antarctica. Next year Khamitsaev will climb North Face Mount Everest by a new route.

Finally, during the 2014 Olympics the team plans to climb Mount Elbrus with Olympic flame. From this climb it will be organized a teleconference with the Sochi.

The project is supported by the Government of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, Mountaineering Federation of Russia, Mountaineering Federation of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, the Alpine Club of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania "Kazbek".

Project Partner - OAO MegaFon

 

Main prizes of 2010 for climbers of Russia (and Ukraine)

Piolet d' Or of Russia will go to Irkutsk (Siberia, Baikal region). Denis Veretenin and Eugene Bashkirtsev received it for their climb of Selestal Peak in China. Prize "Steel Angel" for achievements in mountaineering among women was awarded ... read more

Piolet d' Or of Russia will go to Irkutsk (Siberia, Baikal region). Denis Veretenin and Eugene Bashkirtsev received it for their climb of Selestal Peak in China. Prize "Steel Angel" for achievements in mountaineering among women was awarded to Marina Kopteva (Kiev, Ukraine). For a solo climb on Morcheka Wall in the Crimea.

"Crystal Peak", a prize awarded by vote of website users of Risk.ru went to women's team: leader Marina Kopteva, Anna Jasinskaya (both from Kiev), Galina Chibitok (St. Petersburg) for West Face of Amin Brakk in Pakistan.

Brothers Nefedovs (Sergey and Andrey) from St. Petersburg, won a Risk.ru prize “for the best project”, for the first free climbing of the route Machombo on Morcheka.

 

Photos from Risk.RU

Piolet d' Or of Russia from Grivel

Denis Veretenin (right) and Eugene Bashkirtsev

 

Light style on Selestal Peak

Marina Kopteva - the main person in the party

 

West Face of Amin Brakk

Machombo on the Morcheka Wall in the Crimea - now free by Nefedovs brothers

 

 Andrey (left) and Sergey Nefedov

 

Ueli Steck as a guest of Russia

with Andrey Volkov - the president of Russian Mountaineering Federation

 

 

 

 

Alexander Abramov reports from Antarctica, information of 4 December

South Pole. December 3, a team of 7 Summits Club landed in Antarctica. This is the first our team of the season. We follow the Program Skiing to the South Pole, a length of 111 km. The program is also called the "Last Degree». Band members: Alex ... read more

December 3, a team of 7 Summits Club landed in Antarctica. This is the first our team of the season. We follow the Program Skiing to the South Pole, a length of 111 km. The program is also called the "Last Degree». Band members: Alex Abramov (guide), Alexander Orlov, Arvydas Avulis (Lithuania).

So we flew to Antarctica. All day yesterday were gathering in Punta Arenas, it was a question to fly or not. Good weather was already 10 days and it began to deteriorate. Therefore, the flight was scheduled for the night. As a result, at 2 o'clock in the morning we were informed that we fly. At 5 a.m. the plane took off, and somewhere at 9 a.m. we were at Union Glacier.

This is a new airport, which the company ALE built at the new location. I can tell you: what made it fundamentally different from what was at Patriot Hills. At Patriot Hills was not bad, but here is just amazing. They brought a large number of new modules.

They are not simply shifted the airfield from place to place, they are completely modernized their camp.

Toilets now- a large modules with a metal frame with plastic trim. Inside, some pumps, all very civilized, cool. I think that in Antarctica there is no well-ordered place. Only at the South Pole, Amundsen Base - Scott .. There are cooler, of course. But the Union Glacier - this is a temporary camp, gradually approaching to civilization.

Union Glacier - a very interesting place, mountains are on all sides, very beautiful scenery. Strange, but there always windless, they say that since the opening of the camp there was no wind.

Approximately 50 people flew with us on the plane. Most of them were go to Mount Vinson (35 persons), several people go to the South Pole. We were told that one group is already working on our route, they came out 3 days ago.

Everything is going according to plan. Now we go to bed. The sun never sets, it continues to go, just becomes a night just below.

We got good skis and sleds. Tomorrow afternoon will be entirely devoted to preparation. The day after tomorrow (December 6) in the morning we will depart on 89-th degree and enter the route.

 

 

 

Breakfast at the top of Kilimanjaro

Kilimanjaro. Today, 3rd December a group of the 7 Summits Club breakfasted at the top of Uhuru Peak, the highest point of the massive of Kilimanjaro and the whole of Africa. According to our Tanzanian partner Johnson Kimaro, our climbers reached the ... read more

Today, 3rd December a group of the 7 Summits Club breakfasted at the top of Uhuru Peak, the highest point of the massive of Kilimanjaro and the whole of Africa. According to our Tanzanian partner Johnson Kimaro, our climbers reached the summit in full and everyone was perfectly happy. List of members: Vitaly Golovach, Tatiana Golovach, Ilya Martynov, Yuliya Martynova, Vadim Yakimov, Alexey Krylov, Semion Khait.

Richard Parks ready to take on the world

South Pole. In the third of his BBC columns, Richard talks about his final preparations for his '737 Challenge' during which he aims to climb the highest mountain on each continent, plus reaching both the South Pole and the North Pole for charity - all ... read more

In the third of his BBC columns, Richard talks about his final preparations for his '737 Challenge' during which he aims to climb the highest mountain on each continent, plus reaching both the South Pole and the North Pole for charity - all within seven months in a bid to raise £1m.

The clock is now ticking towards 12 December when I fly to South America and then Antarctica on the way to the start of this most gruelling of challenges.

It's just mind-blowing to think how quickly the challenge has come round from conceiving it 15 months ago. I'm both scared and excited, but just want the whole thing to start.

I've done all the training now and I don't think I can do any more. I feel physically and mentally prepared for the challenge, which if successful will see me become the first person to stand on the continental summits and the poles in the same calendar year.

The challenge consists of the South Pole, Mount Vinson (4,897m), Aconcagia (6,962m), Mount Kilimanjaro (5895m), Carstensz Pyramid (4,884m), the North Pole, Mount Everest (8,850m), Mount Denali (6,194m) and Mount Elbrus (5,642m).

If all goes to plan I'll be at the South Pole on 1 January and finish up at the top of Mount Elbrus on 31 July.

Over the last few months, and especially my final training on Cho Oyu in the Himalayas, I have developed this toolbox of mountaineering skills that will give me the best chance of success. But ultimately we are in the hands of mother nature and she could put a spanner in the works!

Since coming back from the Himalayas in October there has been no let up in attempting to boost my aerobic capacity. I competed in the Cardiff half marathon and then took part in the Cardiff Burn - a 10k run, a 42k bike and a 3k kayak. That was hard, but great preparation.

Everest would seem to be the biggest challenge but we have highlighted Denali as the toughest leg because in it's a brutal mountain in its own right

But I did have a setback when I lost my training partner on a run on the Ogmore coastal trail. Unfortunately my dog Ben fell down a hole and broke his leg. He's feeling a bit sorry for himself but he'll be okay.

The last couple of weeks I have been trying to taper down the training and have given Kevin Morgan, the former Wales international full-back who is helping me train, something of a poser.

I told him I want to be fit and fat before I go! I want to maintain my fitness but also to go into the challenge carrying a bit of extra weight with a big intake of carbohydrates.

A lot of my energies have been put in to the packing and sorting my gear out. I have to pack bags now that will be air freighted on to Everest base camp. Packing for nine legs over seven months is pretty challenging to say the least.

And on the other hand is the charity. I recently visited the cancer day care centre which was a real humbling experience and gave me some real inspiration for my trip.

I have spent every penny I have and every waking hour of the last 15 months on this unique challenge because I am very serious about it and its integrity. I was very down after my rugby career was ended with a shoulder injury and this has given me something to focus on.

At half-time during the Wales v New Zealand international at the Millennium Stadium I was presented with a special badge by Carwyn Jones, Wales' first minister, and WRU chief Roger Lewis. To get the ovation I did from the 70,000-odd fans in the stadium was a real lift.

After leaving on 12 December I don't get much thinking time because I'll be in Antarctica on 14 or 15 December and straight into the challenge. The plan is we get to the South Pole on 28 December.

And that poses a problem because I will have to wait there until 1 January so it qualifies with the calendar year requirements of the challenge. That has been one of the logistical hurdles I've had to overcome and I will have to get a flight back on my own on a supply plane.

Then it's back to Mount Vinson on Antarctica and then on to Aconcagia in South America - the highest mountain outside the Himalayas.

The crux of the challenge is further down the line - the North Pole, followed by Mount Everest and then on to Mount Denali. The North Pole presents the highest risk of cold or frost injury, and every day we are battling the north pole we are missing a day acclimatising on Everest.

Everest would seem to be the biggest challenge but we have highlighted Denali as the toughest leg because in it's a brutal mountain in its own right. Extreme weather systems and I will be doing it at my weakest mentally and physically because I will be coming straight off Everest.

We are aiming to be on Everest in April and May. Statistically the highest summit success rate is early May and after that we are looking at four to six days to climb Denali.

The aim then is to reach the summit of Mount Elbris before 31 July.

Richard Parks was speaking to BBC Sport Wales' Richard Thomas

Source: 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/rugby_union/welsh/9239634.stm

Changes in the program 7 volcanoes: the highest volcano of Asia is in China

Sidley. The program "Seven Volcanoes" is relatively young. American Amar Amdalkar posted great material about it on the pages of his excellent site skimountaineer.com. We, in the 7 Summits Club, rather uncritically copied the list and took it for ... read more

The program "Seven Volcanoes" is relatively young. American Amar Amdalkar posted great material about it on the pages of his excellent site skimountaineer.com. We, in the 7 Summits Club, rather uncritically copied the list and took it for granted. However, refinement began to appear. The first was Mount Giluve in Papua, as the highest volcano in Australia. And now it appeared quite clear that the highest volcano in Asia is in China, in the mountains of Kun-Lun. Ka-er-daxi is 5808 meters high.

 

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http://www.volcanolive.com

Kunlun Volcano is located in Tibet. The volcanic group contains 70 pyroclastic cones and basaltic lava flows. Ashi Shan volcano in the western end of the group is the youngest volcano in China (also known as Ka-er-daxi or Vulkan).

1951 Eruption

The eruption of Kunlun in 1951 was the most recent eruption in China. It was a central vent explosive eruption witnessed by road building workers.

The Kunlun Shan is a major mountain system of Asia, situated in China about halfway between the Himalayas and Tian Shan. It stretches one thousand miles, its snow-and-glacier-clad peaks rising abruptly along the north edge of the vast dry Tibetan plains.

The Kunlun Shan becomes progressively more narrow from east to west, and the narrow western section, just east of the Pamirs, is where the highest peaks are found, towering seventy five miles south of Kashi, the largest city in western Xinjiang Province, China. Near the center of the Kunlun Shan, a 500-mile northern branch called the Altun Tagh splits from the main range and extends northeast.

http://www.summitpost.org/vulkan-ka-er-daxi/464166

This peak is to the best of my knowledge, unclimbed. If it is and the Xinjiang Mountaineering Association decides to follow the rules strictly, the peak fee will be 4400-10255$US! The peak is very small compared to its neighbors and you may be lucky and not charged at all for climbing it. Sometimes you can climb peaks below 6000m with no charge.

Kunlun Shan on Summitpost 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dan Mallory has one last mountain to climb

Vinson. The local insurance broker has climbed the highest peak of just about every continent with family members. Two years ago, the Mallory family made headlines as the first family to reach the summit of Mount Everest. "The goal that was set 10 ... read more

The local insurance broker has climbed the highest peak of just about every continent with family members. Two years ago, the Mallory family made headlines as the first family to reach the summit of Mount Everest. "The goal that was set 10 years ago, was that I climb the highest mountain of every continent with at least one member of my immediate family," said Mallory, who lives in Utopia. The last mountain could well be the most challenging. But Mallory, 59, won't be going at it alone. He'll be joined by Laura, 23, and Adam, 28.

Laura, now a nurse working in Parry Sound, became the youngest Canadian woman to successfully climb Everest. Adam is an electrical engineer in Mississauga.

Second son, Alan, 25, won't be involved in this climb, but he'll be close by.

Newly married, the mechanical engineer took a job in Santiago, Chile. There could well be a family reunion when the climbing trio stops there en route to Antarctica's Mount Vinson.

Dan's wife, Barbara, won't be climbing, but she is making her own arrangements to support the climbing family, likely from a base in Chile.

The climbers are leaving Barrie Dec. 11 and hope to summit Mount Vinson sometime around Christmas.

For Laura, it's a trip of a lifetime that she agreed to go on only last week.

"I almost missed this opportunity," she said incredulously. "I was considering not going because of a job. I should have said yes right away, without thinking about it. It can change your life forever."

It all worked out in the end. She was offered to fill a maternity leave in February, a month or so after the family's return from the climb.

Antarctica is considered the bottom of the world circling the South Pole. It is almost entirely covered by ice, has no government and no permanent population, although it is something of a magnet for researchers, attracting up to 5,000 people to research stations scattered across the continent.

While Mount Vinson isn't considered the toughest of the highest peaks to climb, it is perhaps the least accessible.

"This one has a number of unique challenges," begins Mallory.

Because it is so remote, it will cost the Barrie-area family just about as much to get to as Everest did. The cost of the Everest climb for each Mallory family member was between $40,000 to $45,000, substantially less than the average $75,000 to $100,000 most people shell out to reach the top of the world.

So far, the plan is to fly to Santiago where the Mallorys will catch another flight to Punta Arenas, a city close to the size of Barrie. There the Mallorys will spend about five days getting supplies, organizing their gear and making final arrangements.

From there they will board a Russian propeller plane and land on a blue ice runway at the Patriot Hills encampment, run by an expedition support and touring company. It is a seasonal camp populated by tents during that continent's summer, from November to January.

From there, they board a smaller plane for a one-hour, 15- minute flight to Mount Vinson where they will begin their climb of the 16,200-foot mountain.

Flying from Punta Arenas costs $25,000 per person.

Oxygen isn't necessary for the climb, but there are challenges related to the air. The lower barometric pressure so close to the South Pole means the air is less dense and could feel like a mountain more than 5,000 feet taller than it actually is.

The Mallorys are preparing for the possible physiological impacts. While they each suffered from altitude sickness to some degree at Everest, none advanced to pulmonary or cerebral edema, so they're hoping their bodies will adjust on Mount Vinson as well.

The biggest challenge could well be the wind.

"I'm suspecting the winds are going to be the most unique thing we're going to be dealing with," said the senior Mallory. "But we might be lucky.

"I'm hoping for a clear day, without any wind and we'll get a magnificent view of the Ellsworth Mountains."

It's known to get as cold as -- 125 F, but it will likely be closer to -30 F during their venture.

Just the same, the Mallorys expect their experience at Everest to serve them well.

Certainly much of the gear and clothing they gathered for the Himalayan climb will, once again, be useful.

"I think we could probably live in a freezer with the gear we've got," he laughs.

The advantage is the 24 hours of sunlight.

Just the same, the weather has got to be optimal for the actual day of the climb.

Typically, the Mallorys don't use guides.

This approach served them well at Everest -- there is no better group on which to rely than family members who you trust, know and understand. Unlike solo climbers, who each have individual goals, the Mallorys know they can rely, implicitly, upon each member of their own group. No one Mallory triumphs over another.

The Mallorys have found reliance upon their own judgement to serve them well. But to get to the mountain at the bottom of the world the Mallorys have to use an outfitter and are obliged to take a guide. They will be joined by a climber from Japan. While climbing the Seven Summits was the original goal of the senior Mallory, the plan to include family members in all the climbs leaves the door open for the three children to follow in their dad's footsteps. Afterall, they've all conquered Everest.

"It's actually a feasible goal for me," said Laura, who will have four of the summits under her belt by the end of the year. "I just need someone to climb with for the others."

"I have to be the luckiest dad in the world to have all my family members interested in doing the activities I love so much," said Dan Mallory.

"We can illustrate to others that you can have this relationship with your kids and your family."

thebarrieexaminer.com

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The Seven Summits

At the beginning of this year, 275 people had climbed the seven summits - the highest mountains on the seven continents. By the beginning of next, Dan Mallory expects to add his name to that list. His accomplishments will include:

2002-- Mt. Aconcagua (6,962 m/22,841 ft.), highest mountain in South America;

2004-- Mt. McKinley (6,193m /20,320 ft.), highest in North America 2005-- Mt. Kosciuszko (2,228 m/ 7,310 ft.), highest mountain inAustralia;

2006-- Mt. Elbrus (5,642 m/18,510 ft.) -highest European peak; 2006-- Mt. Kilimanjaro (5,895 m/ 19,342 ft.), highest mountain inAfrica; 2008 - Mt. Everest (8,848 m/29,029 ft.), highest mountain inAsia; 2010 - Mt. Vinson (4,892 m/ 16,050 ft.), highest mountain inAntarctica.

Alexander Abramov, from Punta Arenas, the great work began

South Pole. Arriving in the well-known, friendly city of Punta Arenas, Alex Abramov immediately set to work. First of all - negotiations with ALE, thy must agree everything related to organization and to final payment for programs. Representatives of ... read more

Arriving in the well-known, friendly city of Punta Arenas, Alex Abramov immediately set to work. First of all - negotiations with ALE, thy must agree everything related to organization and to final payment for programs. Representatives of the firm told the good news: the weather in Union Glacier is good. The expectations were confirmed: due to better wind rose, landing of the IL-76 is gone with more reliability. On Saturday, the fourth flight was made, almost all equipment was delivered to Antarctica, the base camp is set. The first group at Vinson has already gone to the Camp Union Glacier.

Alex Abramov will spent three days, waiting for arrival of our first group. In the morning he took from the stock of ALE equipment left after last years season. "Now I will check, it and prepare for transportation”.

Our new group is in Tanzania, summer begins very soon

Kilimanjaro. November, 28 a next group of 7 Summits Club came to Tanzania to climb Rilimanjaro, the highest peak of Africa. The program includes: climbing the Marangu route, safari in national parks and finish in Zanzibar. List of groups: Vitaly ... read more

November, 28 a next group of 7 Summits Club came to Tanzania to climb Rilimanjaro, the highest peak of Africa. The program includes: climbing the Marangu route, safari in national parks and finish in Zanzibar. List of groups: Vitaly Golovach, Tatiana Golovach, Ilya Martynov, Yuliya Martynova, Vadim Yakimov, Alexey Krylov, Semion Hait. December 1 it will begin summer of Kilimanjaro. So a contrast with the cold Russia will be significant.

Alexander Abramov flew to Antarctica

South Pole. Yesterday we said “good by” to our leader, President of the 7 Summits Club Alexander Abramov to Antarctica. He flew out on Saturday morning, as a minimum, for two months. For a modest table there were spoken high words that ... read more

Yesterday we said “good by” to our leader, President of the 7 Summits Club Alexander Abramov to Antarctica. He flew out on Saturday morning, as a minimum, for two months. For a modest table there were spoken high words that connection with him will not be interrupted. Even in the hours and days when modern means of communication will not be able to support it. In the near future, Alexander arrived at the extreme south of Chile, the city of Punta Arenas. December 3, his team plans to fly in Antarctica. It seems to be that an airplane bridge "Continent - Union Glacier” works well and we hoped that the flight will be made on time. We will wait for messages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sokolov and Gorelik plan a new route on Everest

Everest. Gleb Sokolov announced his plans for 2011. He just ensured supports of sponsors: NPF Basc, Grivel, etc. and could now begin to detail plans of expeditions. Projects are, we must say, impressive. Gleb with his partner, Vitaly Gorelik (both ... read more

Gleb Sokolov announced his plans for 2011. He just ensured supports of sponsors: NPF Basc, Grivel, etc. and could now begin to detail plans of expeditions. Projects are, we must say, impressive. Gleb with his partner, Vitaly Gorelik (both from Novosibirsk), is going to climb a new route on Everest. Some experts believe that is impossible to find something new on the slopes of the highest mountain of the World. But look on the East Face, so-called Kanchung Face ! There are three unclimbed buttresses between the American route and the North-East ridge.

Scared even to look? Eyes do not believe, but the hands and feet are doing. That is what these guys have been doing on Pobeda Peak in 2009. Conditions on mountains can be different, you need to watch and think. According to the plan of expedition, acclimatization will be on the classic route from the north side. Probably, it will be in cooperation with a team of 7 Summits Club (leader Alex Abramov). And then, climbers are going to cross the pass ... to make a decision and implement it.

If everything succeeds, they were still alive, then for next summer, Gleb plans to climb a new route also for Pobeda Peak. For this purpose, Alexander Kirikov should join Sokolov and Gorelik. Last season, he participated in climbing a partly new route "Snake" on Khan-Tengri. Sokolov knows Pobeda Peak better than anyone, he climbed it by 4 different routes. Now he has a new idea for new routes.

 

 

Gorelik (left) and Sokolov

 

Aireal  photo by Leo Dickinson

 

 

Gleb Sokolov born in 1953 (September, 5)

He began climb in 1972. His first high-altitude summit was Peak Lenin in 1979.

Master Sport, many time winner and prized of Russia Mountaineering Championship.

Snow Leopard (all seven-thousanders of the former USSR): Peak Lenin, Peak Communism, Peak Korzhenevskoy, Peak Pobeda, Khan Tengri – more than 50 climbs. Gleb have a speed climb record on Pobeda Peak – 20 hours.

Himalayan ascents:

Makalu 1996

Lhotse 1997 and 2000

Lhotse Shar 1998

Lhotse Middle (first climb) 2001.

Everest North Face (new route) 2004

K2 West Face (new route) 2007

Manaslu 2009/

For a new route on Pobeda Peak Sokolov and Gorelik were nominated for Piolet d’Or in 2009 for

Married, 4 children, one grandson.

 

Piolet d'Or 2009. Vitaly and Gleb are staying in the middle