Big interview with Alex Abramov. Fragments. Fully - in Russian

Alexander Abramov is an extra-class climber who has been on the summit of Everest 10 times. Perhaps he is the main in Russia and one of the world's leading experts on high-altitude mountain expeditions. Alex told why people go to the ... read more

Alexander Abramov is an extra-class climber who has been on the summit of Everest 10 times. Perhaps he is the main in Russia and one of the world's leading experts on high-altitude mountain expeditions. Alex told why people go to the mountains and why they die there. And also, how much does it cost to climb to the highest peak of the planet, and at what height the line between a man and a woman is blurred.

 

Fully - in Russian

 

 

For six months in the office - how do you keep your form?

 My form is my work tool. Any guide should be a priori stronger than any of his clients, only in this case it makes sense to pay him. Stronger both theoretically - to know more about the mountains, to have more experience, both morally and physically.

 Therefore, I do everything for my work. So, today I came to the office only at 13:30 - in the morning I ran, did exercises. I believe that every person is obliged to devote at least an hour, and this is 4% of the day, to physical training outdoor.

 Now I am 56, many have surrendered by this age, are hunched over. And I’ve been climbing for 38 years and don’t drink any pills.

 

 

Has your occupation made you rich? Do you have half a million rubles a month on your personal account?

 

I don’t know how much I earn per month, but this amount, the price of a used car, doesn’t scare me. I know that Gazprom top managers also have 3 million a month, but how happy are they at their offices at the meetings?

 

Whether I became rich or not is a difficult question, but the fact that I have a very interesting life is for sure. For me, every trip to the mountains is a bright spot burned in the brain with a laser. And sitting in the city is such a gray strip. I will never remember what I did on Friday of such and such a date, such and such a year. But if you ask me, remember, in the year 2012 you were on Everest? Remember, on May 3 we were there with the same person? I can recover all day in my head and tell you.

 

But the rest ... Yes, in order to live, you need to earn some chips, this is 100%, but this is just not so interesting.

List of Seven Summits Climbers from Russia

The 7 Summits Club  plans to reward climbers on the "Seven Summits", that is, the highest peaks of all continents, a special sign of honor. What will be the order of awarding, we will inform later. Now we offer you to look at the list ... read more

The 7 Summits Club  plans to reward climbers on the "Seven Summits", that is, the highest peaks of all continents, a special sign of honor. What will be the order of awarding, we will inform later. Now we offer you to look at the list of summiters from Russia plus those of whom we consider "our". Citizens of Russia in this list are 38 people. And they all, somehow, climbed in the programmes of the 7 Summits Club. With the exception of the first – Fedor Konyukhov, who also was in our group climbing Everest, but after the completion of the program "Seven Summits".  We are proud to note that, apparently (accurate statistics have not yet been restored), Russia is in second place in the world in terms of the number of climbers to the highest peaks of the continents. And this is the merit, first of all, of our 7 Summits Club!  We are proud!

 

1997.05.26  Fyodor Konyukhov.               Kosciuszko        

2005.11.13  Dmitry Moskalev.    Kosciuszko   2008.02.28-Carstensz

2005.12.15  Alexander Abramov.             Kosciuszko 2008. 02.28 Carstensz

2005.12.15  Victor Bobok.            Kosciuszko 2013.11.08 Carstensz

2006.01.10  Boris Sedusov.          Kosciuszko 2006.01.06

2006.02.02  Karo Ovasapyan (Arm-USA) 2008.02.28

2007.05.19  Israfil Ashurly (AZR)Kosciuszko        

2008.07.06  Igor Pochvalin.          Kosciuszko 2017.11.04  - Carstensz

2008.12.09  Sergey Larin.                            

2008.12.12  Sergey Kofanov.                     

2009.01.02  Lyudmila Korobeshko.          Kosciuszko 2010.10.16 - Carstensz

2010.07.22  Elena Gorelik.           Kosciuszko 2013.09.26

2010.12.27  Sergey Kovalev        Kosciuszko         

2011.01.07  Maxim Bogatyrev.                 

2011.05.21  Yuri Beloyvan.                         

2011.05.21  Igor Prinziuk                             

2012.05.17  Mikhail Turovsky.    Kosciuszko 2013.09.23 Carstensz

2012.11.01  Andrey Podolyan.   Kosciuszko        

2012.12.11  Maxim Shakirov.      Kosciuszko        

2012.12.11  Ivan Dusharin.          Kosciuszko        

2012.12.23  Dmitry Sokov.           Kosciuszko        

2013.09.26  Vitaly Simonovich.                 

2013.10.25  Andrey Filkov Kosciuszko   

2014.01.06  Igor Kadochin.          Kosciuszko        

2014.06.10?        Sergei Dudko.                 Kosciuszko          

2014.06.10?        Dmitry Krasnov.               Kosciuszko        

2015.04.13  Igor Stolyarov.                         

2015.05.29  Yaroslav Sabyrbaev (KAZ)                  

2015.06.15  Sergey Dmitriev                      

2016.05.09  Maria Gordon.                        

2016.05.20  Igor Demyanenko.                

2016.11.01  Irina Kharazova.                      

2017.05.22  Evgeny Kravt.                          

2017.06.20  Alexey Bautin.          Kosciuszko        

2017.11.04  Oleg Savchenko.                    

2017.12.14  Tatiana Jalovchak (Ukr).                      

2018.05.17  Alexander Tertychny.                          

2018.05.17  Dmitry Tertychnyy.               

2018.05.17  Alexey Balakin.                       

2018.05.19  Jamilya Murtazina.                

2018.11.09  Vladimir Belkovich.

2018.11.09  Kirill Semeshkin.

2019.01.06 Vladislav Lachkarev

How to climb Mount Everest (according to Noel Hanna, whos climbed it eight times)

In 2006 Northern Irish adventurer Noel Hanna summited Everest for the first time in his life, one year after suffering retinal haemorrhaging on his first attempt. Not content with climbing the world’s tallest mountain, after his ... read more

In 2006 Northern Irish adventurer Noel Hanna summited Everest for the first time in his life, one year after suffering retinal haemorrhaging on his first attempt.

Not content with climbing the world’s tallest mountain, after his descent Hanna then cycled down to sea level.

 In the following year the adventurer would complete the same feat on six different peaks; Mt. Vinson, Cartensz Pyramid, Mt. Elbrus, Mt. Denali, Mt. Kilimanjaro and Aconcagua, each the tallest mountains on their respective continents.

 Hanna is the first and so far only person to complete this astounding challenge.

 “It was a good challenge so it was,” he chuckles, reflecting on the superhuman effort.

 Ten years after his first successful Everest attempt, the Dromara-based climber has returned to conquer the mountain a further seven times – twice with his wife.

 

Hanna’s Everest pet-hate is poorly prepared climbers not respecting the mountain.

He wants to share his wisdom for those looking to take on the unforgiving mountain – less the mountain disrespects them back.

 Training on the hills – then climbing another mountain Hanna’s background in running ultra-marathons meant that he was well prepared for taking on Everest. However, he suggests that we don’t all need to be at that fitness level.

“If you’re a person of regular fitness, running 10ks or half marathons and going to the gym two to three times a week, that’s the base and then it’s just about getting out to the hills and walking with a big rucksack.

“Walking at weekends, maybe a four hour-walk or a five-hour walk in the hills with a backpack on.

“It’s very beneficial if you go to a high mountain before you go to Everest. Somewhere like Aconcagua in South America.”

 

Noel Hanna and his wife Lynne at the top of Everest (Photo: noelhanna.com)

 

Training the mind

Hanna suggests that the fitter you are, the more confident you’re going to feel on the mountain.

 “If you’re the weakest on a team, mentally that’s going to bring you down; if you’re one of the fittest on the team, mentally that’s keeping you strong.

“Go at your pace, don’t try and keep up with someone else just because they’re on your team, you have to go at your own body’s pace.”

 

Hanna’s kit list for Everest expeditions

Equipment for Base Camp and Advanced Base Camp: Duffle bag, sleeping bag, foam pad, gas lamp, gas stove, gas cylinders, personal items for washing, your favourite games, notebook

Technical equipment for ascent: Crampons (e.g. Grivel G12), rucksack 70-80 litres, rucksack 35-40 litres, harness, prussiks, karabiners with screwgate lockers – 3 items, jumar (ascender), telescope ski poles, thermos, rappel device, ice axe, head lamp, photo camera, video camera and assessors, accumulators, personal crockery for high camps

Equipment for body and feet: Trekking shoes, boots of “Everest” Millet type, down jacket + down trousers (or down overalls), Gore-tex jacket with wide hood, Gore-tex trousers (better semi-overalls), windblock jacket, windblock trousers, jacket “Polartec – 100”, warm underwear, personal underwear, Polartec gloves, Thinsulate gloves, Thinsulate mittens, warm woolen socks, balaclava, warm hat, windblock face mask, UV glasses, ski goggles (preferably), gaiters

 

Hone your ropework in the

 

Highlands Any technicals skills required to take on Everest can be perfected in the Scottish Highlands, or the Alps, according to Hanna.

“With Everest, there’s a technical side to it, but you don’t need to be super skilled on ropework for Everest.”

 Hanna says it is essential to religiously work on your ropework, be confident in rapelling (abseiling) and jumarring (climbing up a rope).

 Additionally, would-be Everest climbers need to be competent in clipping in and out of ropes, as well as passing anchors.

 “All of that could be done in the Highlands of Scotland or even in a climbing gym, but obviously it’s more beneficial to get in the snow with your crampons on and doing the training that way, or going to the Alps and doing Mont Blanc.”

 

Don’t rely on the sherpa

All climbers must be capable of doing the climb by themselves and there can be no over-reliance on sherpas.

 “A lot of people will think ‘Oh I’ve got a sherpa, if something happens to me he’s carrying me down’, but if the sherpa feels that his life is at risk he’s going to leave you.”

 

Tortellini and Coca-Cola

Hanna suggests that a drastic change in diet isn’t necessary for taking on the mountain.

“Some people take protein powders, but I don’t. I just eat normally, I don’t change my diet from home when I’m on the mountain because most good expeditions on the mountain, especially in the North side, get fresh stuff in all the way to base camp.

“We cook food all the way up to 7,000 metres and it’s really only on summit push at 7,700 and 8,300 that you use boil in the bag food, but normally we would have tins of tuna and foil packs of tuna.

“Ideally I like to put on maybe two or three pounds before I go to the mountain.

” Keeping yourself well fed even when your appetite fades is essential, says Hanna.

“A lot of people over 6 -7,000 metres lose their appetite. You need to force yourself to eat. It’s like a car if you don’t put petrol in it, it’s not going to go.”

 The Northern Irishman’s unconventional eating and drinking habits suggests there is room for a few home comforts when tackling the fearsome summit.

“The first year I was climbing there with a good friend of mine from Italy and he had taken tortellini pasta up with us and I had packets of tuna and we just made a lovely meal before we went to summit.

“I’ve always taken a bottle of Coke with me and I remember three years ago going for the summit – I had a small bottle of Coke – stopping to take a drink of it and as soon as I opened the lid it just exploded and 90% of the liquid inside just flew out of it with the pressure.

 

 

“I was devastated.” Noel Hanna (Photo: noelhanna.com)

 

 ‘There is no wall’

Hanna recommends running your own race and ignoring mountain literature that tells you exactly where you will struggle. Undoubtedly having strong mental fortitude is crucial to a successful ascent.

 “I went into climbing from endurance sports, like 100 mile runs. Somebody who has never done a marathon before, the first thing they will say to you is ‘when will I hit the wall?’ It’s a myth, it’s somebody else’s wall.

“If you’ve read a book that says you’re not meant to struggle till 7,000 metres and you’re struggling at 6,000 metres, mentally that’s going to affect you.

“I’ve seen people who struggle on their first acclimatization rotation, but once they get that sorted they’re the strongest on summit push. “I always said that 70% of it is in the head.”

 

 Bring a lucky charm

Making  physical, technical and mental preparations is empirical, but having a lucky charm is also of importance, says Hanna.

“My wife gave me a lucky black cat on a keyring and it’s gone to every mountain with me since 2004.

“I’m not superstitious or anything, but every single mountain that I go on, it’s attached on my rucksack.

“When I’m leaving on an expedition I need to make sure that cat’s with me.”

 

What does Everest mean to Hanna?

For most who complete the summit, Everest will hold a special place in their heart. For Hanna it was just another mountain – until his German Shepherd Babu passed away last year.

 “Me and my wife have a German Shepherd pup who was ten and a half years old, he passed away 10 months ago. We said if anything ever happened to him we’d take his ashes to the summit of Everest.

 

“That’s what me and my wife did this year, we took his ashes with us and we sprinkled them a couple metres from the summit and had a wee tearful moment for him.

“When I think of Everest now, I think of my dog’s ashes. Everest is the most thoughtful mountain for me. We don’t have any children so he was the closest thing we had.”

Read more at: https://inews.co.uk/essentials/news/uk/girls-body-image-one-three-believe-not-pretty-enough/

Factuals Facts about Alexander Abramov climb Elbrus with a Land Rover

This site propose fairly short and concise statement of the facts from different areas of knowledge. Elbrus is described briefly and in half of the cases with errors and inaccuracies. However, the final part of the text pleased us. Here ... read more

This site propose fairly short and concise statement of the facts from different areas of knowledge. Elbrus is described briefly and in half of the cases with errors and inaccuracies. However, the final part of the text pleased us. Here facts are basically correct and the name of our leader Alexander Abramov rightly inscribed in the history of the mountain.

http://factualfacts.com/world/mount-elbrus/#__scoop_post=b5eabce0-d7e5-11e4-8a30-001018304b75&__scoop_topic=4009301

“1997

Russian Alexander Abramov guided a ten man expedition, where a Land Rover was driven to the peak. It took 43 days to accomplish this goal, but there were a lot of struggles that had to be overcome. They had to change tyres and utilize winches to pull the vehicle up and it was a continuous cycle of ascending and descending the mountain to retrieve replacement parts that had got damaged. After a lot of sweat and tears they finally reached the peak on September 13, 1997. The Land Rover was abandoned after an attempt down, when they lost control. They later returned to fetch it, but found it too difficult. It still sits in the same spot today and can be seen by other climbers and adventurers”.

Film and pictures:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The world record of Vitaly Simonovich

Reaching the North Pole by ski Vitaly Simonovich became the first person who made the collection: 7 Summits + 7 Volcanoes + 2 Poles           read more

Reaching the North Pole by ski Vitaly Simonovich became the first person who made the collection: 7 Summits + 7 Volcanoes + 2 Poles

 

 

 

 

 

Great Success of the Congress of Everest Climbers

It was not like a Congress, it was a real holiday.Holidayof meetings, celebration of gratitude. More than 60 climbers from 10 countries of the former Soviet Union gathered in the lecture hall of thePolytechnicMuseum. UIAA President Fritz ... read more

It was not like a Congress, it was a real holiday.Holidayof meetings, celebration of gratitude. More than 60 climbers from 10 countries of the former Soviet Union gathered in the lecture hall of thePolytechnicMuseum. UIAA President Fritz Vrejlandt was a guest of honor of the event. All the climbers on Everest were awarded by Commemorative " Mount Everest Climber", specially made for this day. All members of the Congress and the spectators were unanimous gratitude to the organizers.

 

 

Fritz Vrejlandt

 

Mountaineering Federation of Russia and the 7 Summits Club were the organizers of this unforgettable event.

 

 

Veteran of mountaineering, Professor Ivan Bogachev spoke about the history of preparation of the first expedition to Everest in theSoviet Union. The decision was made in 1948. Legendary Eugene Abalakov was then the main initiator of the organization of the expedition. After his death, Kirill Kuzmin took the preparation for Everest for himself. In 1959, an expedition was completely ready, but her departure was canceled due to the uprising in Tibet.

 

 

Only in 1982, the dream was realized for our climbers. 11 climbers have reached the top of the World by a new, very difficult route. This achievement has had a huge impact on all of us.

 

Climbers of 1982

 

 

In 1990, the new Russian flag was first raised on Everest. President of the Russian mountaineering federation Andrey Volkov was then among climbers.

 

 

In 1996, a team fromKrasnoyarskopened a new route (couloir Zakharova) on the northeast side ofMount Everest. In 2004, the national team under the leadership of Viktor Kozlov made a new route on the center of the North Face of Everest.

 

 

In the new century, a new life has come to Everest. Alexander Abramov, became a main person inRussiaon Everest. Total Alex participated in 12 expeditions to Everest, 10 of them as a leader. Dozens of climbers thanked him for his help in the realization of their dream.

 

Alex (on the left) and apart of the 7 Summits Clib Everest summiters

Photos of Danila Kolodin

 

Summiters from Ukraine (from left): Victor Bobok (3 different routes), Sergey Kovalev,Sergey Bershov, Mstislav Gorbenko, Igor Svergun, Alexey Bokov

 

Ivan Dusharin (3 times) came direct from Mount Kosciuszko

 (project Alpari - 7 Summits for 300 days)

 Anatoly Ovchinnikov - 85 years

 

Kazbek Khamitsaev from North Osetia

 

 

Kazbek Valiev

 

Fritz Vrejlandt and Andrey Volkov

 

Sergey Bershov

 

Vladimir Shataev

 

Maxut Zhumaev and Visily Pevtsov

 

Alexey Ovchinnikov, Sergey Bershov and Anna Arinina (second Russian woman on Everest)

 

 

Victor Kozlov

 

Alltogher

 

 

 

Our friend Lincoln Hall, who survived the Death Zone of Mt Everest, is died.

  Our sincere condolences to his wife Barbara and sons! Unfortunately, we didn't meet Lincoln more after expedition of 2006. We saw him in the film, read the book and thought that sometime the destiny will bring together us in Katmandu ... read more

 

Our sincere condolences to his wife Barbara and sons! Unfortunately, we didn't meet Lincoln more after expedition of 2006. We saw him in the film, read the book and thought that sometime the destiny will bring together us in Katmandu or in Sydney. Alas, the ruthless illness deprived of us such possibility. Lincoln Hall disappeared in history and took in it the worthy place.

 

 

 

 

 

From obituary

AUSTRALIAN MOUNTAINEER, LINCOLN HALL has died last night after a short but typically spirited battle with mesothelioma.

His wife Barbara and long-time friends and fellow mountaineers Tenzing Sherpa and Greg Mortimer were with him. Greg, the Australian Geographic Society's deputy chairman, phoned this morning to deliver the sad news.

"It was very peaceful in the end, around 11.45 last night," Greg said. "Lincoln got into quiet, rhythmic breathing - it was almost meditative - and then he quietly slipped away."

A brilliant, witty and open-hearted man, Lincoln was a key member of the 1984 Australian Everest Expedition that put the first two Aussies - Tim Macartney-Snape and Greg Mortimer - atop the world's highest mountain, and came within a few hundred metres of the summit himself. Lincoln's story of the expedition, White Limbo, is a classic of mountaineering writing and one of the best known of his several books. His successful 2006 climb of Mt Everest and famous survival epic after being left alone above 8000m in caught worldwide attention. His account of the story, Dead Lucky, was published in 2007.

Lincoln served on Australian Geographic's original editorial advisory panel in the 1980s, wrote several stories for the journal and was a great supporter of the AG Society and other Australian adventurers. His service to adventure was recognised by the Society in 2010, when he was presented with the Lifetime of Adventure award. He was also a founding director of the Australian Himalayan Foundation, which strives to improve education, health and environmental outcomes for people of the Himalaya region.

"I was lucky enough to walk with Lincoln in the Everest region in Nepal a few years ago and it's a trip I'll never forget," said AG editor and Society trustee Ian Connellan. "He was so funny and warm, and had such a wonderful, open, uncomplicated honesty. I'm terribly sad to know that I won't get to laugh with him again."

AUSTRALIAN mountain climber Lincoln Hall has died from mesothelioma. He was 56.

The world-renowned mountaineer, who was a member of the 1984 first Australian Everest expedition, died ''peacefully'' in Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney yesterday, said Australian Himalayan Foundation chairman Simon Balderstone.

His wife, sons and close friend and fellow mountaineer Greg Mortimer were with him.

 

 

Australian mountaineer Lincoln Hall with his wife Barbara in the Nepali capital after his rescue.

''Lincoln was well-known for his feat of survival on Everest in 2006, when, after summitting the mountain he collapsed just below the summit and had apparently died, only to be found alive the next morning by climbers on their way up the mountain,'' Mr Balderstone said.

Mr Hall's lawyer, Theodora Ahilas, from Maurice Blackburn, which recently concluded an asbestos compensation claim for Mr Hall, said his disease was allegedly linked to asbestos exposure as a child.

''Lincoln was an amazing man who was able to remember a remarkable amount of detail about his exposure to asbestos as a child,'' she said. ''It was alleged that in 1965 and 1966, Mr Hall assisted his father to build two cubby houses using asbestos cement flat sheets on their property in Red Hill in the ACT.''

Canberra Climbers' Association president Zac Zaharias said Mr Hall would always be regarded as a prominent climber. He said Mr Hall would be remembered not only for his amazing feats on Everest, but for his drive and moving writing.

He was also a compassionate man in his role as director of the Australian Himalayan Foundation, set up to help impoverished communities, he said.

In 2006, a rescue team of sherpas helped the veteran climber descend 1700 metres from where he had collapsed after a successful climb to the summit. It had been reported 24 hours earlier that Mr Hall had died on the mountain.

He had to be carried over several obstacles and restrained when he became delirious from altitude sickness. But word got back from the highest camp on the peak that he had walked the last few hundred metres into North Col camp before collapsing. He was left for dead on the mountain at 8700 metres when he broke down while descending from the 8848-metre summit. Those with him could not move him after he became delirious, a sign of oedema, or fluid on the brain. His companions in a Russian-led expedition were forced to leave him on the mountain overnight.

The next morning another group of climbers found him, still clinging to life, and a rescue party brought him down.

In a 2007 interview on ABC TV's Enough Rope, Mr Hall said he was attracted to climbing mountains because of the physical dangers, but also the challenges, like ''mental fortitude, physical fortitude, judgment''.

''It's the intensity of the experience, at a sustained level. The experience is incredibly intense because it is so dangerous,'' Mr Hall said. Away from the mountains, Mr Hall said his wife and their two sons made ''the world go round''.

Asked how she felt when her husband left the family to go climbing, his wife, Barbara Scanlan, said she knew she could never change that part of him. ''I guess climbing and, more so, mountaineering is such an integral part of Lincoln and what makes him tick,'' she said.

Project Alpari On Top of the World: planned routes and records

  February, 9 Ludmila Korobeshko flew to Argentina. The next day she was followed by Ivan Dusharin and Maxim Shakirov. So practical implementation of the program "Alpari on top of the world" begins. The 7 Summits Club not only ... read more

 

February, 9 Ludmila Korobeshko flew to Argentina. The next day she was followed by Ivan Dusharin and Maxim Shakirov. So practical implementation of the program "Alpari on top of the world" begins. The 7 Summits Club not only delegated to the program our director, but we take all organization and logistics. Alpari project can enter their place in the general history of the program Seven Summits. Here is a list of World and National records that our team can beat on success of the event:

1. Fastest collective (more than two people).

2. First all Seven by not classic routes.

3. First all Seven Summits by traverses.

4. The fastest female for the Seven Summits. At the moment the record is 360 days (Annabelle Bond, United Kingdom - Hong Kong)

5. The first TWICE of the 7 Summits for woman by Ludmila Korobeshko

All of them, of course records will be valid for Russia (Europe and CIS ....)

Actually it will be an absolute national record of speed for 7 summits.

And national age record for Ivan Dusharin - 65 years.

 

In Mendoza

 

Project Alpari: On Top of the World

Alpari has decided to take on a new challenge for the year 2012: planting the Alpari flag atop the tallest mountain on each continent. To accomplish this feat, we have put together a team consisting of three of the experienced mountain climbers from Russia has to offer. With this project, we are not only looking to expand our presence across the globe, to each of the world’s seven continents, but also to draw some attention to mountain climbing, a sport which has become something of a passion for many within our ranks.

“Mountain climbing as a spiritual journey… record-breaking climbs as a metaphor for achieving greater success in life,” commented Alpari Public Relations Director Dmitriy Tarasov. “This is something we can relate to. Alpari is a bona fide leader in the Forex industry. For us, there is no mountain too high.”

Mountain climbing is already somewhat of a tradition here at Alpari. As recently as 2010, a team of our employees took part in an expedition to Africa, planting the Alpari flag on the summit of Kilimanjaro. Not long before that, there was a trip to Mont Blanc. “Climbing mountains is a great tradition for us; one where we must overcome great difficulties, the cold and harsh living conditions. But we always manage,” said Alpari’s Chairman of the Board, Andrey Dashin.

No one in Russia has ever completed the world-famous “7 Summits” challenge in under a year. Alpari’s hand-picked team is looking to do just that!

We wish them good luck. And good weather !

 

Here’s the plan:

Aconcagua (South America): February 11-28 (18 days)

Kilimanjaro (Africa): March 7-13 (7 days)

Everest (Asia): April 11 – June 8 (59 days)

McKinley (North America): June 20 – July 10 (21 days)

Elbrus (Europe): September 1-7 (7 days)

Kosciuszko (Australia): November 3-7 (5 days)

Mount Vinson (Antarctica): December 1-19 (19 days)

 

ROUTES

Mount Aconcagua (6,962 m) – Although ascending Aconcagua often seems simple at first, this mountain is susceptible to sudden changes in weather and violent storms.

False Polish Traverse, descent by classic to Plaza de Mulos

 

 

Mount Kilimanjaro (5,895 m) – Ernest Hemingway once sang the praises of Kilimanjaro, which promises to be the perhaps the warmest and least inhospitable climb for our team.

Umbwe route, descent by Marangu route

 

 

Mount Everest (8,848 m) – Each year, the world’s tallest mountain draws in hundreds of climbers looking to test their personal limits, and each year, many of these climbers end up paying the ultimate price.

New route traverse North Summit (Chagtse) – Main Peak.

Descent to the North Col and ABC camp

 

For Everest Traverse our team will be strengthened. Currently, Alexander Abramov (as a leader), Ludmila Korobeshko, Ivan Dusharin, Maxim Shakirov and Mingma Gelu plan to take part in the ascent. The route will start from the campsite Changtse on the left moraine of the Rongphu Shar Glacier (Changtse camp - 6000m). From there the group plan to climb to the North (North East) ridge and then to the summit of Changtse 7543 meters. Where exactly they will rise to the North East ridge of Changtsze it will be determined on the spot. There are several options. From the top of Changtsze descent leads by a steepslope via South Ridge on the North Col - 7000m. Then the group will use standard camps on the classic route at 7700 and 8300 meters. From there they will try to climb the main summit of Everest (8848 m). Way back to the North Col and down to the standard camp ABC at 6400 meters.

 

 From Jan Kielkowski. Mount Everest Massif

 

 

 

 

Mount McKinley (6,194 m) – Known to native Alaskans as Denali (“the great one”), McKinley is the tallest mountain in the world measured base to peak. During the ascent, climbers must confront the bitter cold, an exhaustingly long climb and stringent legal restrictions, including a policy which requires all climbers to carry all of their “waste” back to base camp.

West Rib

Descent by Western Buttress route

 

 

 

Mount Elbrus (5,642 m) – Located in the Caucasus Mountains, Elbrus demands a great deal of focus and discipline from climbers. This guileful inactive volcano often surprises climbers with streaks of brutal winter weather and strong winds.

Traverse from the East (Irik Valley) Eastern Peak - Western Peak

Descent via the Khotiu-Tau Pass

 

 

Mount Kosciuszko (2,228 m) – Getting to this mountain is difficult, but the view from the top makes the trip worth it.

Route Main Ridge Track from Charlotte Pass

Descent to Thredbo

 

 

Mount Vinson (4,897 m) – Our climbers will come face-to-face with ice storms and some of the coldest weather on our planet to reach the highest peak in Antarctica.

Probably Rudi's Runway (Lang 1991) Route

 

 

The team

 

 

Ludmila Korobeshko

Ludmila was the first woman from Russia to complete the “Seven Summits” challenge and just the third Russian woman to climb Everest. Her resume includes more than 50 successful climbs and a trip to the North Pole. She has been working as a mountain guide/translator and organizing expeditions for more than a decade. She also writes and makes short films.

The first Russian woman to complete the “7 Summits” challenge

The first Russian woman to complete the “7 Summits +1” challenge (the +1 being the Puncak Jaya, or Carstensz Pyramid, in Indonesia)

The third Russian woman to climb Everes

An experienced mountain guide and director of the “7 Summits Club”

14 years of experience climbing mountains and organizing expeditions (9 years professionally)

More than 100 successful ascents across the world

Class A mountain climber, guide, English translator

Has climbed and trekked in the mountains of the Causasus (Russia), France, Peru, the United States, Tibet, Nepal, Mexico, Argentina, Ecuador, Tanzania, Ukraine, Australia, New Zealand, Japan and Turkey

Has led more than 20 expeditions to the peak of Elbrus

 

Ivan Dusharin

Ivan is a world-class mountain climber with more than 300 successful climbs under his belt, including Everest. He is an experienced guide and leads expeditions all around the world. His hobbies include photography and filmmaking. Dusharin is the author of a book “Crossing the Abyss on a Wire”.

http://www.alpari-life.ru/en/alpinisty_vaza/

 

Maxim Shakirov

Maxim is the man behind “New Year’s on the Summit” as well as a 2014 Olympic Games flag-bearer. He has already planted the Olympic flag atop mountains on five continents, including Mount Everest. He is a journalist, filmmaker, photographer and traveler