Providing expeditions
since 2005

Artem Rostovtsev from Kilimanjaro: program ends with success

  Our group made a successful ascent of Kilimanjaro. It was a little cold, it was hard, but all members were on the top. We then spent two days on safari in the Lake Manyara parks and Ngorongoro. The program ends on Zanzibar. Guide ... read more

 

Our group made a successful ascent of Kilimanjaro. It was a little cold, it was hard, but all members were on the top. We then spent two days on safari in the Lake Manyara parks and Ngorongoro. The program ends on Zanzibar.

Guide Group: Artem Rostovtsev

Team members:
Anton and Valery Konobeev,
Liana and Renad Chabdarov,
Eugene and Eugene Kravt,
Daria Ufimtseva,
lubov Mironov,
Valery Ustinov.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Seven Summits records! On Russian TV

Vinson. The Seven Summits records! The Team made up of Lyudmila Korobeshko, Ivan Dusharin and Maxim Shakirov battled frigid Antarctic winds for two long weeks, barely managing to get in a shot at the summit before a brutal snowstorm began. "The ... read more

The Seven Summits records!

The Team made up of Lyudmila Korobeshko, Ivan Dusharin and Maxim Shakirov battled frigid Antarctic winds for two long weeks, barely managing to get in a shot at the summit before a brutal snowstorm began. "The journey was an entirely new experience for us, but it was difficult too – technically, physically and emotionally – in large part due to the cold", said Ivan Dusharin about the expedition:

They’ve done it on December 11, 2012 (coincidentally International Mountain Day). Russian climbing trio reached the summit of Vinson Massif, the highest mountain inAntarctica, capping off their year-long mountain-climbing marathon, "Alpari: On Top of the World".

The Vinson expedition was Lyudmila Korobeshko’s second trip toAntarcticathis year. In January she took part in a ski expedition to the South Pole. About her experience on Vinson, Lyudmila said, "I was the only one from the team that had already been to the summit of Vinson, so I had a pretty good idea of the difficulty and the danger that were in store for us. The toughest parts had to be going two weeks without a shower and dragging sleds filled with our own waste. Well, that and the cold, of course. Everything else was fun."

The Team now holds a number of new records, having completed the Seven Summits in only 300 days.

First and foremost, our captain, Lyudmila Korobeshko, is the new holder of the women’s Seven Summits speed record, meaning she climbed the highest mountain on each of the planet’s seven continents faster than any woman in history. This year, she also became the first woman fromRussiato climb Everest twice. Ivan Dusharin also set the Russian Seven Summits "age" record. Ivan turned 65 this fall. In addition to the remarkable individual achievements of Lyudmila and Ivan, our trio also set the Russian Seven Summits team speed record. What better way to bring in the holidays?

If you would like to learn more about our team’s adventures throughout the year and access exclusive photos and video content, you can find all this and more on Team official site.

www.Alpari-life.ru

 

 http://www.m24.ru/videos/9461

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aconcagua: our group go up to Nido de Condores

Aconcagua. Dima Ermakov and Denis Saveliev with a group afer breakfast went up from the Canada camp to Nido de Condores. It is an acclimatization outing...     read more

Dima Ermakov and Denis Saveliev with a group afer breakfast went up from the Canada camp to Nido de Condores. It is an acclimatization outing...

 

 

Asian Trekking's Celebration of 30th Anniversary

  Dear friends, I wish you a Healthy, Prosperous and Happy New Year 2013!!!! Asian Trekking's Celebration of 30th Anniversary: Completing the year 2012, was a landmark for Asian Trekking. It marked the completion of our 30 year journey ... read more

 

Dear friends,

I wish you a Healthy, Prosperous and Happy New Year 2013!!!!

Asian Trekking's Celebration of 30th Anniversary:

Completing the year 2012, was a landmark for Asian Trekking. It marked the completion of our 30 year journey since being established in 1982.

 

To celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Asian Trekking in adventure tourism, we organised a tree plantation programme followed by a picnic on 30th Dec 2012 at Lakhuri Bhanjyang, above Kathmandu Valley. Among our 122 staffs (office and permanent field staff) most of them were present on the occasion.

On the occasion we felicitated, with certificates and rewards, our staffs who have been with us since the beginning in 1982. I feel proud to mention that these loyal and hard working staff are Suk Bahadur Ale (Sukre), Kali Bahadur Basnet (Kalu), Mingmar Tamang, Bhai Kaji Tamang (Maila Tamang) and Bala Bahadur Magar (Maila Magar). And, to my great surprise and honour, the field staff presented me with a mini stupa as a "token of love." It is because of our staffs' hard work, honesty, passion and dedication that Asian Trekking is where it is today.

An interaction program between office staff and field staffs were also held on that day. Various topics were discussed such as improvement in Asian Trekking’s services, welfare of the staffs, upgrading equipment to meet the existing requirement, required training for the climbing guide as well as trekking guides, cooks, kitchen boy etc. Though we completed 30 years, we are excitedly looking forward to the next 30 years.

 

 

Joint Tourism Coordination Meeting Between Nepal and China

On 17th and 18th December I attended the Sixth Meeting of the Joint Tourism Coordination Committee between the Government of Nepal and the People's Government of Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) which was held in Lhasa. I was a member of the Nepalese delegation, in the capacity Mountain and Adventure Tourism Expert.

The meeting was held in a very cordial and friendly atmosphere. The 17 member Nepalese delegation was headed by Mr. Mohan Krishna Sapkota, Joint Secretary of the Ministry of Culture, Tourism and Civil Aviation of the Government of Nepal and the Tibet Autonomous Region delegation was led by Mr. Yu Yun Gui, Director of Tibet Tourism Administration of the People’s Government of Tibet Autonomous Region.

 

The purpose of the meeting was to promote and expand cooperation in the areas of tourism and trade to the mutual benefits of both Nepal and Tibet Autonomous Region.

 

Meeting with China Tibet Mountaineering Association

Also, on 19th December 2012 I had a meeting with China Tibet Mountaineering Association (CTMA) general secretary including other authorities of CTMA over the Tibet Expedition.

 

 

We discussed about the cooperation of future expeditions and how to run the expeditions smoothly without disruptions, visa issues and border closures. We also discussed over the issues of rope fixing, route making and permit fees on Mt. Everest, Mt. Ch-oyu, Mt.. Shishapangma and other mountains inTibet. CTMA assured me that the future expedition will run smoothly. I firmly believe that our mutual cooperation and our frequent dialogue will bring fruitful results in the development of mountain tourism both in Nepal and Tibet Autonomous Region. I will continue to voice our concerns with the authorities for the betterment of mountaineering and tourism in the Himalayas.

 

First Aid and Medical Training:

Continuing our committment of safety in the mountains, this year again Asian Trekking organized first aid and medical training for the staff. A total of 40 staff participated in a two day training program.

The course focused on First Aid, Patient Stabilization, CPR, High Altitude Sickness and Response, etc.

Our sincere gratitude goes to Dr. Pranav Koirala, Dr. Kamal Thapa and Dr. Simant Thapa of the Mountain Medicine Society for conducting the training.

 

 

Maurice Herzog, French mountain climber, dies at 93:

I also have sad news to share. Legendary French mountaineer and author Maurice Herzog, died at the age of 93 on 13th the December 2012. Maurice and his climbing partner, Louis Lachenal ascended Annapurna I, the 10th-highest mountain in the world, on June 3, 1950. Doing so, they became the first person in history to successfully climb to the top of an eight thousand m peak.

Following this feat, Maurice wrote the hugely popular book, Annapurna, which has been translated into dozens of languages and estimated to have sold more than 20 million copies worldwide. First published in 1951, Maurice's book put Nepal on the world map ‘for the first time’ and greatly promoted Nepal as a mountaineering and tourism destination.

I am very proud to have known him as a close friend. His passing is a great loss, though his legacy survives in all the mountaineers and adventurers he inspired.

Asian Trekking and I express our heartfelt condolences to his family and pray for his peaceful eternal journey.

Thank you for your support:

Lastly, it is my pleasure to keep you all up to date as to our activities here in the Himalaya. If you have any questions please do let me know. I thank you for your support in the past and look forward to our cooperation in the future.

Ang Tshering Sherpa

Asian Trekking (P) Ltd

www.asian-trekking.com

Our group in the base camp Plaza de Mulas

Aconcagua. Today our big group (12 climbers + 2 guides) reached the base camp Plaza de Mulas. Everything is OK. Guides: Dima Ermakov and Denis Saveliev.               read more

Today our big group (12 climbers + 2 guides) reached the base camp Plaza de Mulas. Everything is OK. Guides: Dima Ermakov and Denis Saveliev.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Team of climbers for the Mount of Sidley

Sidley. As we reported, on January 10 the second in the history expedition to the summit of the highest volcano in Antarctica -Mount Sidley will start. This very remote from civilization mountain is part of the project seven highest volcanoes of ... read more

As we reported, on January 10 the second in the history expedition to the summit of the highest volcano in Antarctica -Mount Sidley will start. This very remote from civilization mountain is part of the project seven highest volcanoes of continents. A group of the 7 Summits Club for Mount Sidley climb consist of  Vyacheslav Adrov and Vitali  Simonovic. Permanent guide of ALE David Hamilton goes with them. Multiple summiter of Mount Everest, he had (early in his career, in the first half of the 90) lots of climbs in the Caucasus.  Another partner and a client oa ALE - it will be a Canadian climber, doctor of geology Paul George Nicholson.  

Paul Nicholson - a Canadian geologist, constantly working in Saudi Arabia. He works in the oil industry - Saudi Aramco. In his spare time, he studied all the traces of volcanic activity in the Arabian Peninsula. Paul went on five continents for climb the highest volcanoes.  In case of success at Sidley, he will ascend to the Ojos del Salado, to become the third in the list "seven volcanoes" climbers after Mario Trimeri and Coco Popescu.

Paul sent us pictures from his ascent of Mount Giluve( Australian continent)

 

Date of ascents Paul Nicholson

Giluve, 14/09/2008
Damavand, 08/07/2007
Kilimanjaro, 17/11/2004
Orizaba, 16/11/2010
Elbrus, 17/08/2005

Additional objects:

Ararat, 29/08/2011

 

Nicholson

 

Photos from Giluve

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Gallery of Sidley 2011 (Alex Abramov)

/photos/all/section_69/

 

 

Alex Abramov from the South Pole

South Pole. Hello! Now 9 p.m. by Chile time. Our team is, without loss, came to the South Pole. So, we are five. We are at the South Pole. Congratulations to all with Ortodox Christmas. Today we also will celebrate it. Hooray! Tomorrow we plan to fly ... read more

Hello! Now 9 p.m. by Chile time. Our team is, without loss, came to the South Pole. So, we are five. We are at the South Pole. Congratulations to all with Ortodox Christmas. Today we also will celebrate it. Hooray! Tomorrow we plan to fly to the Union Glacier. It is likely the 10th of January we'll be in Chile. Today the weather was really bad. We even got lost a bit in the blizzard. But we managed to find the pole. All is well. Goodbye!

 

 

 

Irish climber Ian McKeever killed on Mount Kilimanjaro

Kilimanjaro. Ian McKeever once held the record for completing the seven highest peaks in the world in the fastest time An Irish mountaineer and charity fundraiser has died while climbing Mount Kilimanjaro inTanzania. Ian McKeever, who was 42 and from ... read more

Ian McKeever once held the record for completing the seven highest peaks in the world in the fastest time

An Irish mountaineer and charity fundraiser has died while climbing Mount Kilimanjaro inTanzania.

Ian McKeever, who was 42 and from Lough Dan in Wicklow, was leading a group of climbers when they were struck by lightning.

Mr McKeever was a leading member of the Kilimanjaro Achievers Team, a group of veteran climbers which led groups to the top of the mountain.

 

 

In 2007, the adventurer had scaled Mount Everest.

He is also the former holder of the record for completing the seven highest peaks in the world in the fastest time - 32 days fewer than the previous record.

In 2009, he was part of a team that attempted to row the South Atlantic Oceanin under 30 days, but the boat lost its rudder and they were forced to postpone the attempt.

More recently he had been attempting, along with African climbing guide friend Samuel Kinsonga, to break the record for the fastest ascent of Kilimanjaro, as part of their anti-racism Black and White Makes Sense Campaign.

Mr McKeever was the author of two books - Give Me Shelter and Give Me Heroes - and was working on a third book Give Me 28 Days.

On his Facebook page on Wednesday night, a statement said: "It is with deep regret, that we, Ian's family, fiancee Anna and friends, advise of his sudden death on Kilimanjaro, today, doing what he loved best."

Mr McKeever had been posting messages on the site during the ascent of the mountain.

His last post, on Tuesday, said: "Shira 2, 4,000m. Torrential rain all day. Spirits remain good even if drying clothes is proving impossible! We pray for dryer weather tomorrow - the big day. It's the Lava Tower."

It is understood none of the other climbers suffered serious injuries.

 

 

 

In a message of condolence, Irish Prime Minister (Taoiseach) Enda Kenny said: "I was very saddened to hear of the death of renowned adventurer Ian McKeever.

"I had come to know him over recent years and I admired him not only for his own achievements and charity work but also for his work with young people in challenging them to achieve their full potential.

"He was extremely passionate about what he did and driven in his belief that everybody can achieve their potential during their lifetime.

"Ian said to me once that there was no place he would rather be than in the mountains."

 

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-20896985

 

Site of the project:

http://www.kilimanjaroachievers.com/Team.html

 

Seven Summits record

 

 

 

 

 

“My Dad phoned my Mum from the hospital yesterday to convey the very sad news. He said that he was fine but he was thrown into the air by a bolt of lightning, so I’m anxious to hear from him again.”

Mr McKeever had climbed Kilimanjaro several times, often leading groups of youngsters, and was on this occasion leading a large team of mostly Irish climbers raising money for charity.

The attempt on the 19,340ft mountain,Africa’s tallest, began on December 30 and immediately ran into unseasonal bad weather.

 

On Mr McKeever’s Kilimanjaro Achievers Facebook page, colleagues wrote that the group was above 13,000ft but that conditions had been terrible throughout the climb.

“Torrential rain all day,” they wrote on Wednesday. “Spirits remain good even if drying clothes is proving impossible! We pray for dryer weather tomorrow – the big day.”

They were due to ascend to the Lava Tower, a key point of acclimatisation at 15,000ft, before descending slightly to sleep before pushing higher towards the summit, which they aimed to reach late on Friday.

The storm is understood to have worsened as the group was climbing towards theLavaToweron Wednesday.

Mr McKeever died later that evening.

Among those taking part in the climb was a school group from Ballinamore in north-westernIreland, with four students and a teacher, Aoife Ni Mhaille.

Padraig Leyden, head of St Felims College, said he had a brief conversation with Miss Ni Mhaille.

“It was very frightening and very severe,” Mr Leyden told The Daily Telegraph. “The group hid behind rocks for the entirety. I do not know whether they witnessed what happened.

“They were taken off the mountain and were brought to a local hospital for checks. All the students are physically fine, but naturally very upset about what’s occurred.”

Tributes poured in for Mr McKeever and his achievements during a decade-long mountaineering career in which he set a world record for the fastest successful summiting of the highest peaks on all seven continents, finishing the feat in 156 days in 2007.

Pat Falvey, renowned Irish explorer, said Mr McKeever “followed his dreams with conviction and inspired others”.

“It was a freak accident and a complete fluke,” he told the Irish Independent. “I have lost two friends in lightning strikes, including one on theHimalayas— but they are very rare on Kilimanjaro.”

Taoiseach Enda Kenny said: “Ian said to me once that there was no place he would rather be than in the mountains.

“I would like to extend my sympathies to his fiancee Anna and his family, friends and fellow adventurers.”

 

Artem Rostovtsev with a group on Kilimanjaro

Kilimanjaro. Hello! This Artem Rostovtsev, from the slopes of Kilimanjaro. We are now in the camp of Mandara. Today, the entire group met inAfricaand we have started a program Climbing Kilimanjaro.   read more

Hello! This Artem Rostovtsev, from the slopes of Kilimanjaro. We are now in the camp of Mandara. Today, the entire group met inAfricaand we have started a program Climbing Kilimanjaro.

 

At last we started for South Pole

South Pole. Hello! This is Alex Abramov from Antarctica. Today we managed to get out from the Union Glacier base and to start our route. So, we are now on the way to the South Pole!  We feel great, everything is OK, excellent, we all are alive and ... read more

Hello! This is Alex Abramov from Antarctica. Today we managed to get out from the Union Glacier base and to start our route. So, we are now on the way to the South Pole!  We feel great, everything is OK, excellent, we all are alive and well. Today, we made 8 kilometers. It was just the first day, we had to use our work. So, tomorrow we have to go for 12 kilometers. Goodbye!

 

 

 

The first part of the Aconcagua season. two death

Aconcagua. Season opened, as usual, on November 15. The number of tourists, climbers once again increased, by 10 percent. This occurred despite a significant increase in the cost of permits. Weather was good at first, but in December spoiled. Most ... read more

Season opened, as usual, on November 15. The number of tourists, climbers once again increased, by 10 percent. This occurred despite a significant increase in the cost of permits. Weather was good at first, but in December spoiled. Most climbers returned home without the summit, because of the strong winds

Many climbers asked for help from rescuers during the first period of the season. Mainly these were minor incidents.

The most significant rescue was in early December. Eliana Caamano, a girl-guide, hired by the U.S. company Mountain Trip, tried to climb to the top with a disabled Afghan war, 29-year-old American, Neil Duncan

 Eliana and Neil did not reached the summit because of bad weather and fatigue. On the descent they were hit by a snowstorm, gave a signal for help and stay for a night in the region of Independencia. A group of four young rescuers went to meet them. They went half night, and it was not in vain. Neil lost his sight (snow blindness), was in very poor condition. Only the use of artificial oxygen and medication has helped him gain strength for further fight for life.

The next day a large group came up for the rescue, it was about 25 people went out from the camp Plaza de Mulas. By the joint efforts they managed lowered Eliana and Neil to the Nido de Condores camp. From there, a helicopter was able to pick them up to Horcones.

At the end of the year there was a bad case with a Japanese mountain climber. At Plaza de Mulas Rangers suddenly noticed that 34-year-old Minoru Kawada does not come out of the tent third day. Opening it, they found a Japanese climber unconscious. He was urgently transported to the hospital inMendoza, but doctors do not guarantee that he can be saved. So far, he's in a coma.

 

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Colorado man among two mountaineers killed on Argentina climb

By Kirk Mitchell
The Denver Post

 

 

An avid climber and adventurer, Eric Nourse traveled to Alaska in 2006 to tackle Denali. (Photo courtesy of Candee Nourse)
When planning how to summit 22,841-foot Mount Aconcagua in Argentina, Greeley resident Eric Nourse, as usual, chose the riskiest route.

On Saturday, the decision had terrible consequences. He and longtime friend David Reinhart of Lake Oswego, Ore., died, likely from complications of altitude sickness. Only Eric's twin brother, Greg Nourse of Portland, Ore., survived.

"He never wanted to die. He's just a large risk- taker," Greg Nourse said of his brother.

Greg Nourse spoke Tuesday via Reinhart's satellite phone from Mendoza, Argentina, where Eric Nourse's body was taken for an autopsy.

Reinhart met the Nourse brothers at a fraternity at Oregon State University in the late 1980s. They shared a taste for extreme adventure, and for the next 23 years they often traveled together to the Alps, Denali or the Andes in South America.

Eric Nourse, 41, had a Greeley flooring business. Whenever he could, he was in the wilderness: kayaking, rafting, scuba diving, skiing, snowboarding, fly fishing, mountain biking, hiking, hunting elk.

The twins and Reinhart would plan big trips for months. In 2004, the Nourse brothers rode motorcycles through Mexico, Guatemala and Belize for two months. They climbed Denali twice.

Eric Nourse was full of life, said his wife, Candee Nourse.

"He could climb a tree like a monkey. There was something that was not quite human about him," she said.

Candee Nourse said she never worried previously about her husband going into danger because he was never worried, but this time was different. It wasn't that the South American peak was a technically difficult climb.

"He said, 'It's the weather. It gets brutal, and it takes lives,' " she said.

The three friends reached the "high camp" tents at 19,200 feet in elevation on Mount Aconcagua by Thursday. They considered going on the Polish Traverse but decided to take the more challenging route up the face of the Polish Glacier.

At 4 a.m. Friday, the three embarked for the summit with Eric Nourse leading the way under a full moon.

The glacier was almost all ice with little snow for traction, and it was much steeper than they had anticipated. They had not carried enough ice screws and snow pickets along for the longer ice climbs.

"It was more taxing and time- consuming," Greg Nourse said.

They didn't reach 22,000 feet in elevation until after dark. Reinhart was suffering from altitude sickness and couldn't go any farther.

Eric Nourse said he was going to summit the mountain in the moonlight, find the less challenging trail down the mountain and get help.

Greg Nourse said his brother climbed another 600 feet and searched for the trail down.

Climber Eric Nourse sets off on his 2006 Denali climb in Alaska with gear in tow. (Photo courtesy of Candee Nourse, The Denver Post)
When he couldn't find the trail, he climbed down the steep north face of the mountain.
"It was basically a sheer cliff," Greg Nourse said.

The decision slowed Eric Nourse considerably. The next morning, 10 hours after his brother had left, Greg Nourse strapped his friend to an ice wall and climbed the mountain to find the easier trail down.

He waited near the summit for 2½ hours before the first climber of the day reached the peak so he could ask how to get down the mountain. While there, he called Reinhart's wife, Char, who set into motion an emergency response in Argentina.

"It was a really emotional phone call. She knew we were in trouble," he said.

Six hours later, Greg Nourse made it back down to the high camp. His brother limped into camp 90 minutes later, exhausted. Argentine EMTs advised Eric Nourse to climb down the mountain and not sleep. The oxygen content in his blood was dangerously low. Porters offered to carry their equipment down the mountain for them. But Greg Nourse said his brother felt that would have been admitting defeat.

"Eric wouldn't have any part of that. We carried our gear up the mountain, and after a little catnap he would carry it back down. He was never concerned about dying," Greg Nourse said.

Minutes after Eric Nourse went to sleep in his tent, emergency workers tried to rouse him. His heart rate dropped. When it stopped, they tried to resuscitate him.

 

 

But he was dead.

It took another 2½ days before porters reached Reinhart's body on the glacier. Reinhart had somehow climbed another 150 feet up the mountain before collapsing.

 

 

Happy New Year !

Elbrus.   Happy New Year ! Best Wishes ! Follow your dreams, climb high, be happy, enjoy your life, love your love, be yourself ! Yours friends from Moscow, With respect and love, 7 Summits Club               ... read more

 

Happy New Year !

Best Wishes !

Follow your dreams, climb high, be happy, enjoy your life, love your love, be yourself !

Yours friends from Moscow,

With respect and love,

7 Summits Club

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alexander Abramov reports from Antarctica

South Pole. Hello!  Alexander Abramov reports from Antarctica. Our team of five people going on the route Last Degree.   Today is  December 30, and  tomorrow, December 31, in the morning, we want to fly out  the route to ... read more

Hello!  Alexander Abramov reports from Antarctica. Our team of five people going on the route Last Degree.   Today is  December 30, and  tomorrow, December 31, in the morning, we want to fly out  the route to celebrate the New Year  on the way to the Pole. All is good. Food, tents ... Today we practiced how to put up tents, assorted products, poured gasoline in cans, all equipment prepared. We will try tomorrow morning to fly the route.

 If not, we'll have to meet the New Year inAntarcticawith the team of ALE. It is also good, here there are a lot of young, beautiful girls. Good bye! Next time we will   contact you from  to route. Bye!

 

 

 

 

Record-setting alpinist Haruhisa Watanabe feared killed on Russia road

Everest. Kyodo MOSCOW — Renowned climber Haruhisa Watanabe is believed to have died Wednesday morning when his bicycle was run over by a car in northwest Russia, his relatives and Foreign Ministry officials said Thursday.   Haruhisa ... read more

Kyodo MOSCOW — Renowned climber Haruhisa Watanabe is believed to have died Wednesday morning when his bicycle was run over by a car in northwest Russia, his relatives and Foreign Ministry officials said Thursday.

 

Haruhisa Watanabe

 

The ministry informed his father, Hiroyasu, that the victim was "almost certainly" Watanabe, who in 2004 became the youngest Japanese climber to scale the tallest peaks on seven continents at age 22.

The Japanese Embassy confirmed that the passport and an identification card from Kyushu Sangyo University in Fukuoka Prefecture found with the body belonged to Watanabe, 31, who was traveling in the Murmansk region.

The embassy is considering sending staffers to the hospital where the body was taken after the accident. It will then be transported back to Japan.

Watanabe's 57-year-old father confirmed he received a phone call from the ministry Thursday morning but said, "I do not want to believe it until I see his face."

The Tass news agency reported that the car was being driven by a 56-year-old man at the time of the accident.

It is thought that driving conditions were hazardous because of poor visibility since the sun barely comes up for most of the day in the area Watanabe was cycling in, carrying such items as a tent and sleeping bag, local media reported.

Watanabe claimed the seven-continent climbing record in June 2004 after traveling to Alaska and scaling Mount McKinley, the highest peak in North America.

 

 

7summits.com

 

Elbrus    -   Vinson   -   Everest

   

Alexander Abramov with a group of the South Pole in Punta Arenas

South Pole. Alexander Abramov met in Punta Arenasa  a new group. They went through all the procedures and are ready to take off at Union Glacier. Their program is Last Degree on ski. Edward, Alex, Sergei, Roman in a briefing before leaving for ... read more

Alexander Abramov met in Punta Arenasa  a new group. They went through all the procedures and are ready to take off at Union Glacier. Their program is Last Degree on ski.

Edward, Alex, Sergei, Roman in a briefing before leaving for Antarctica.

Another member, Vitaly, is waiting for the group at Union Glacier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Noel Hanna recommends. Experience of five Everest climbs.

Everest. 44-year-old guide of expeditions of 7 Summits Club on Everest, our great friend Noel Hanna is 5-time Everest summiter. He is a records man for Irish. A former cop, Noel mow is focused on sport.Marathonrunner and mountaineer, he is a fitness ... read more

44-year-old guide of expeditions of 7 Summits Club on Everest, our great friend Noel Hanna is 5-time Everest summiter. He is a records man for Irish. A former cop, Noel mow is focused on sport.Marathonrunner and mountaineer, he is a fitness instructor, guide and also earns from advertising.

The magazine Mountain Pro published an article, that gives concise and accurate advices to those who are going to climbMount Everestfrom Noel….

Read Online .......

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our friend and partner Noel Hanna, Northern Ireland based adventure sports trainer and endurance athlete finished his project named 7 SUMMITS TO SEALEVEL. It means climbing Seven summits of the world's highest peaks, followed by seven arduous and top-speed descents to Sea Level. Almost five years, seven continents, thousands of column inches in media coverage - and one goal in sight, a new entry in the Guinness Book of Records.

http://7summits-club.com/newsarchive/all_1/date_2010_1_18_1/item_1570/

 

 

Mount Everestas you've never seen it: zoom in on the remarkable 4bn pixel image

Explore a huge photograph showing Everest in extreme detail. What looks like litter might in fact be base camp, and what you think is a speck of dust could be a climber. Click the green boxes to zoom to a panoramic photo. Ed Douglas. ... read more

Explore a huge photograph showing Everest in extreme detail. What looks like litter might in fact be base camp, and what you think is a speck of dust could be a climber. Click the green boxes to zoom to a panoramic photo.

Ed Douglas. guardian.co.uk, Thursday 20 December 2012

Filmmaker and climate-change campaigner David Breashears spent this spring taking around 400 images of Everest and its near neighbours from a vantage point above base camp through a 300mm lens. Now he's released them digitally stitched together to form one image.

The result is a stunning panoramic photograph of the Everest region – with a twist. You can zoom in on specific areas and see the roof of the world in extraordinary detail. From a distance small colourful dots mark the location of base camp. Zooming in, you can pick out each tent clearly – and a man bending down as he washes his face.

The high definition also allows viewers to examine the mountain's icefall – and even pick out climbers descending between terrifying ice cliffs and crevasses. Think of it as an extreme, alpine version of Where's Wally.

Everest itself is the highest summit in the picture (just to the left of centre), a black pyramid towering above its paler western shoulder. Zooming in, you can see in detail the peak's famous yellow band - a section of interlayered marble, quartz and semi-schist. To the right of Everest, at the head of the western cwm, isLhotse, the fourth-highest mountain in the world, that rises up from the south col. Right again is Nuptse, the third peak in the Everest horseshoe. Like the western shoulder of Everest, the rock here is granite.

Curling from between Everest and Nuptse is the Khumbu glacier, a chaotic river of ice flowing downhill splitting into crevasses and ice cliffs. The route up Everest climbs up the left-hand side of this, and several climbers are visible on the thin trail that snakes up this dangerous section. To the left of the Khumbu glacier's lower section, the small colourful dots become the tents of base camp, giving an indication of just how popular climbing Everest is these days.

Source >>>>>>>

 

 

 

Glacierworks Project

http://www.glacierworks.org/the-glaciers/pumori-spring-2012/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This fullscreen panorama was published in connection with the 50 year anniversary in May 2003, for the first who reached the top of Everest.

50 years ago May 29 1953 The top ofMount Everestwas reached for the first time by Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay.

Since then 1.200-1.500 has climbed the top. Nobody knows the exact number. More than 140 climbers died on the way.

On May 24, 1989 the Australian photographer and mountaineer Roderick Mackenzie reached the summit. He was no 271 since 1953

He made which as far as I know is the only 360 degree panorama From the top.

Roderick Mackenzie made the image at the top ofMount EverestMay 24 1989. Below is in his own words his feelings of the event.

 

 

Olga Rumyantseva group arrived at Union Glacier

Vinson. During the descent from the summit of Vinson, the weather turned bad. Severe storm accompanied climbers to the High camp. It was very cold. The next morning, there was not any possibility of going down. Only by noon the wind calmed down and ... read more

During the descent from the summit of Vinson, the weather turned bad. Severe storm accompanied climbers to the High camp. It was very cold. The next morning, there was not any possibility of going down. Only by noon the wind calmed down and the group went down to the base camp. It was Christmas. The next morning, December 26, the Rangers suddenly gave the command to gather. And soon the plane landed, it took the group to the camp Union Glacier, where the festival continued.

 

 

Our group on the summit of Vinson

Vinson. This is Olga Rumyantseva. From the summit ofMount Vinson. Today we climbed it by all team. Dima Sokov closed Seven Summits climbing this ... Here in a fog, we can not see anything at all. Now we start to descend. Hello! Team: Anatoly ... read more

This is Olga Rumyantseva. From the summit ofMount Vinson. Today we climbed it by all team. Dima Sokov closed Seven Summits climbing this ... Here in a fog, we can not see anything at all. Now we start to descend. Hello!

Team: Anatoly Stegney, Vitaly Simonovich, Dmitry Sokov (44 years, the city ofYuzhno-Kurilsk) and Alexander Lozhkin. Guide Olga Rumyantseva.

 

 

Mountain Film News & Reports

Elbrus.   Everest calling film students! $100,000 for the best film. KATHMANDU, Dec 5: PartyNepal Outdoors will be hosting a global film competition called “Let’s Go Everest,” targeting film students from around the world. ... read more

 

Everest calling film students!

$100,000 for the best film.

KATHMANDU, Dec 5: PartyNepal Outdoors will be hosting a global film competition called “Let’s Go Everest,” targeting film students from around the world.

The press release states that it will also mark the Diamond Jubilee of the ascent of Mt Everest by Tenzing Norgay Sherpa and Sir Edmund Hillary. A global TV channel is also partnering with PartyNepal for this competition.

During the press meet, Shree Gurung, Director of PartyNepal, informed that 108 students from 108 different countries will be coming toNepalon an all-expenses-paid trip for 25 days.

The students will then be free to make their films on any of the four categories: travel and adventure, people and culture, tourism and economy, and environment.

Shree Gurung (C), Director of PartyNepal, along with Dawa Sherpa (R), Team Leader, and Deebas Bikram Shah (L), General Secretary of the Nepal Mountaineering Association, addressing the media about the global film competition, ‘Let’s Go Everest’, during the press meet held at Red Carpet, Durbar Marg on Tuesday.

Their films will have to be submitted within 30 days from the trip. The films will be judged by online voting and by two judges, one of whom will be a representative of PartyNepal.

A winner will be selected from each category and they will be presented with camera equipments and other accessories as well as an internship with the global TV channel. The winner of the best film award will receive a cash prize of US$100,000 along with an internship with the channel.

Dawa Sherpa will be leading the team of students on their trip to Everest. Expressing his full commitment, he said, “It’s an attractive way to bring together everythingNepalhas to offer.” The four categories were all connected to him, one way or another, he said.

According to Gurung, PartyNepal is arranging with global agencies to select a film student from a recognized university from each country. The registration for the competition, which is free of costs, will have to be made online and will start from early next year.

http://nepaloutdoors.com/partynepal/home.php

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PartyNepal is a pioneer and no doubt the most successful event management company in Nepal, our history dates back nine years and during our tenure we have bagged a lot of rewards, recognitions and have proved our self synonymous to hip and happening. Our expertise comes after nine years of largest concerts, loudest parties and lavish events. Beside our expertise on event management we are also responsible night-out informatics via our popular website www.partynepal.com ; Our website not only include pictures from our events but also is equipped with event listing; recommended bars, clubs, restaurants, lounges profiling and even the event listing hence our website is a complete directory for those who seek life during or after routine.

Event Management: We are not only pioneers in professional event management services inNepalbut also synonymous in qulity events.

Brand Launching & promotion: One of the most effective ways to launch a product is to have the physical participation of customers and our events have always maintained the best reputation on Brand launching and promotion via our innovative ideas and strategies.

Corporate events: From entertainment to groom up sessions, we offer highly motivational and recreational seminars, sessions and events.

Multimedia production: Our In-house multimedia production handles all the multimedia production related services. which includes, Photography, Videography, Graphic Designs, Corporate documentaries, TV Commercials etc

Web Development: We are now equipped with all kind of web development services from web designing to web developing.

 

 

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Director Baltasar Kormakur Talks EVEREST Movie Based on 1996 Accident;

Hopes to Be Filming This Summer

After HBO’s THE MISSIONARY by Steve 'Frosty' Weintraub.

While director Baltasar Kormákur (The Deep, Contraband) is busy in post production on next summer’s 2 Guns starring Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg, that doesn’t mean he’s not planning future projects. As we’ve previously reported, Kormakur is going to direct the HBO pilot for The Missionary, which would take place during the 1960s and center on an American missionary (Benjamin Walker) who gets caught up in Cold War intrigue while helping a young woman escape East Berlin. He told me the plan is to film this April inHungaryand a few days inEast Berlin, and after the project wraps, he hopes to make Everest (which is a working title).

According to Kormakur, the film recounts the story of an accident onMount Everestin 1996. When I asked him the size and scope of the project, he said, “It’s a very, very big movie with a medium budget.” To make it look as real as possible, he plans on filming onMount Everest, traveling as far up the mountain as he can with actors. They will also film on a glacier for three months. For more on the project hit the jump.

Before getting to today’s interview, if you missed Kormakur talking about his film The Deep (Iceland’s official Academy Award selection for Best Foreign Language Film), click here. Here’s what he had to say about 2 Guns and here’s The Missionary.

http://collider.com/baltasar-kormakur-everest-movie-interview/212820/

Baltasar Kormakur Time Index:

Says his next project after The Mission will likely be Everest (working title). It recounts the story of an accident onMount Everestin 1996.

0:45 - The Deep was deliberately filmed, but Kormakur restrained his filmmaking so it would not get in the way of the story. Everest will be similar, but he may have to “open it up” to deal with the spectacle ofMount Everest.

3:20 – He is considering all types of actors for Everest, but suggest the big parts will go to movie stars.

3:50 – Says, “It’s a very, very big movie with a medium budget.” He will film onMount Everest, travelling as far up the mountain as he can with actors. They will also film on a glacier for three months.

4:45 – They are still figuring out the plan, but Kormakur hopes to film summer into autumn because the conditions are more accommodating.

5:10 – Stephen Daldry was attached to write this story a while back. Kormakur brought on young writer Justin Isabel.

6:10 – Kormakur gives the synopsis. It is a well-known storm that hit Everest climbers in 1996

 

 

--

Baltasar Kormákur Baltasarsson (born 27 February 1966) is an Icelandic actor, theater and film director, and film producer. He is known professionally as Baltasar Kormákur.

He is best known for directing the films 101 Reykjavík, Hafið, A Little Trip to Heaven (starring Julia Stiles and Forest Whitaker), and a film based on the book Mýrin (Jar City) by Arnaldur Indriðason. His father is the Spanish painter Baltasar Samper.

For his film Mýrin, he won the Crystal Globe award at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival in 2007.

His 2012 film The Deep was selected as the Icelandic entry for the Best Foreign Language Oscar at the 85th Academy Awards.[1]

 

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Into The Mind Of Dave Mossop: Heel Pieces

By Ryan Dunfee | December 3rd, 2012

“Heel Pieces” is a column by Ryan Dunfee published twice a month on TetonGravity.com. In each entry, Dunfee tackles one of the top ski news stories of the moment in an effort to provide insight behind the hype. This week, Dunfee caught up with Sherpas Cinema director Dave Mossop to learn more about the production company's much anticipated action sports film “Into The Mind.”

Into The Mind Of Dave Mossop: Heel Pieces

The skiing internet was awash last week with fans and industry figures alike all trying to outdo each-other in stating their enthusiasm for the Sherpas Cinema trailer for "Into The Mind" that features Imagineer-level visual trickery, cinematography that would make the producers of "Planet Earth" cough up a lung, and explosive action shots set to a soundtrack of electronic and tribal beats. While the combined effect sent most into a social media sharing hysteria with captions written in caps lock, this author saw only two filmmaking phenomena historically doomed to fail: getting action sports athletes (namely skiers) to reveal anything remotely insightful from their "Minds," and casting multiple sports, in this case skiing, snowboarding, surfing, and white-water kayaking, in the same film. I took Sherpas director Dave Mossop to task on how exactly he hopes to transcend boundaries a second time with "Into The Mind."

Ryan Dunfee: It’s a historical fact that no skier in history since Ernest Hemingway has ever said anything remotely insightful. By going “Into The Mind(s)” of skiers, what do you hope to reveal to the world? That they are all stoked, love skiing with friends, and feel they need to work hard to get shots?

Sherpas Cinema director Dave Mossop: Any real mountain person knows that skiing and snowboarding isn’t always stoke and fun with your friends. It’s about challenge, perseverance, freezing weather, shit conditions, and a lifetime of enduring injuries, and even death. Yes, skiing is fun, extremely fun, but it also comes with all of humanity’s many emotions. We want to show that living a ski or snowboarding lifestyle is one of the greatest lives on Earth, and that all these emotions play a role in taking you to your ultimate potential.

RD: Can you explain, mechanically, how you guys achieved those motion sickness-inducing rolling circle shots?

DM: Stick, camera, tape. This is all you need. Tape camera to one end, pivot stick on other end.

RD: You highlight a diverse selection of athletes skiing, surfing, snowboarding, and kayaking. Traditionally, cross-sport movies have never performed very well. How do you plan on breaking the mold this time around?

DM: We'll be trying to not make it lame.

RD: What can viewers who’ve seen All.I.Can expect to be the same or different, stylistically or otherwise, this time around?

DM: We learned a lot during the making of All.I.Can., and we want to bring that knowledge to the table. We can’t stop being who we are, so you’ll see our personalities come through as always, but we hope to evolve to a higher level of storytelling. ITM will take a slice from the avalanche safety message of The Fine Line and the environmental consciousness of All.I.Can, but those aren’t what this is about. This will be new.

RD: What are you guys doing in the filming, interviewing, etc. that is going to do a better job of getting to some deeper emotional or psychological understandings that other filmmakers have been able to accomplish before? Are there other films, inside of skiing or outside, that influenced the approach to Inside The Mind?

DM: Well, we’ll probably just avoid interviews entirely. Actions speak louder than words.

Our work is, of course, inspired and heavily influenced by dozens of incredible artists. Films that pop to mind include: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Being John Malcovich, Inception, Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Baraka, Dark Side of The Lens, Nostalgia, There Will Be Blood, Stranger Than Paradise, Jacob’s Ladder. And great directors like Michel Gondry, Spike Jonze, Tarantino, Ron Fricke, Stanley Kubrick, Andrei Tarkovsky, Chris Cunningham, Dziga Vertov, Wim Wenders, Wes Anderson, The Cohen Bros, etc.

 

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To Stand Above the Clouds. Rex Pemberton's record breaking climb of Mount Everest. At Twenty one years of age, mountaineer Rex Pemberton set off to become the youngest Australian to climb Mt Everest. This story is inspirational.

 

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Warren Miller Entertainment joining forces with Al Gore

Jason Blevins

The Denve rPost

Al Gore says he was drawn to moviemaker Warren Miller's team as film crews and athletes reported alarming loss of snowpack around the world.

The Lower 48 scenes from Warren Miller's "FlowState" are telling. The Canyons segment could have been filmed in July. The Northstar footage — all terrain park — works to avoid shots showing swaths of dirt flanking the snow.

While theAlaskaandJapanshots are exceptionally snowy, theU.S.shots in Warren Miller Entertainment's 63rd annual ski film reflect what was one of the driest ski seasons ever recorded. So it makes sense thatBoulder's WME recently joined forces with Al Gore's The Climate Reality Project.

With "FlowState" footage fromSvalbard,Norway, showing shrinking glaciers and receding sea ice, the partnership will harness Warren Miller's captivating videos and athlete power to grow awareness of climate change.

The idea is that the athlete involvement in the "I Am Pro Snow" campaign and a soon-to-launch Warren Miller/Climate Reality Project effort will help galvanize skiers and snowboarders toward thwarting the effects of climate change as they see images of their beloved snow melting away.

Gore took the stage Saturday night at the "Flow State" 6 p.m. showing, saying his group was first drawn to Warren Miller's team as the film crews and athletes began reporting alarming loss of snowpack in mountain ranges around the globe. Gore said the dwindling snowpacks can be connected to rampant wildfires in the West, the country's lingering drought and Hurricane Sandy's ravaging of the East Coast.

"It's happening everywhere, and we've got to do something about it. A lot of politicians are scared of big oil and big coal," Gore said. "I would like to think all the skiers and snowboarders together can make up big snow and put some counterpressure on this and say we really have to do something."

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