The team “Russia at the tops of the world" with Luba to finish acclimatization

According the information from Luba Ivanova a guide of Club "7 Summits", the first day of spring, the team “Russia at the tops of the world" has reached Plaza Canada (4850 m) . Here they were met by huge storm. Earlier, a few days in ... read more

According the information from Luba Ivanova a guide of Club "7 Summits", the first day of spring, the team “Russia at the tops of the world" has reached Plaza Canada (4850 m) . Here they were met by huge storm. Earlier, a few days in a row district Aconcagua was badly shaken, the epicenter of the catastrophic Chilean earthquake was located only 200 km. Officially, in region of the highest peaks in South America, the earthquake had a force of 7-8 points.

March, 2 the group started to climb Nido de Condores (5350 m), where they will overnight for acclimatization. By this the stage of acclimatization will be completed and begin preparations for the summit bid.

“Russia at the tops of the world" expedition started at 24th of February, with logistic support of 7 Summits Club. The team consists of 25 climbers from North Ossetia plus a guide of 7 Summits Club Lubov Ivanova.

The idea of this campaign was born almost two years ago, its initiator famous Russia climber, chairman of the Federation of North Ossetia, Kazbek Khamitsaev. In 2008, the project began, first summit to climb was Mount Kilimanjaro. The next goal is South American highest peak - Aconcagua.

The 2010 is also scheduled to climb the summit of Mount Kosciuszko - the highest point of Australia. In 2011 Russia climbers going up on Mount McKinley in North America, in 2012 - on Mount Vinson in Antarctica. Next year Khamitsaev will climb North Face Mount Everest by a new route.

Finally, during the 2014 Olympics the team plans to climb Mount Elbrus with Olympic flame. From this climb it will be organized a teleconference with the Sochi.

The project is supported by the Government of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, Mountaineering Federation of Russia, Mountaineering Federation of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, the Alpine Club of the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania "Kazbek".

Project Partner - OAO MegaFon

 

Sochi 2014 Ambassadors are a select group of sporting and cultural icons who help to promote Russia's first Winter Games and spread the Olympic values worldwide.

Kazbek Khamitsaev. "Climbers know that when conquering the summit, you suddenly acquire a second wind. We wish the Sochi Games organizers to always move forward - from peak to peak- and ultimately, to conquer the main summit and hold the best Olympic and Paralympic Games."

Expedition chief Kazbek Khamitsaev is very experienced climber. He was the leader of three expeditions to Mount Everest, twice climbed the highest peak of the world, making professional video shoot at the top. He also led four expeditions to Pamir and Tien Shan mountains, climbing the five 7,000m peaks: Lenin Peak (7134m), Korzhenevskaya Peak (7105m), Communism Peak, the highest peak of the USSR (7495m), Khan Tengri (7010m), and Pobeda Peak (7439m). So Kazbek ”Snow Leopard.”

Start of season; Edurne Pasaban hope to become the first woman on 14 highest peaks

  Spanish mountaineer Edurne Pasaban said she hoped to become the first woman to scale the world’s 14 highest peaks by conquering the Shisha Pangma and Annapurna mountains this spring. “I leave on March 4. I still have ... read more

 

Spanish mountaineer Edurne Pasaban said she hoped to become the first woman to scale the world’s 14 highest peaks by conquering the Shisha Pangma and Annapurna mountains this spring. “I leave on March 4. I still have Shisha Pangma and Annapurna to do and I aim to try in the spring. I am going first to Shisha and then to Annapurna,” she told the Spanish newspaper ABC published Tuesday.

With Juanito Oirazabal - his climbing father

Last October, bad weather forced her to abandon an attempt to climb the 8,027-metre Shisha Pangma, situated in China’s Tibet region. That would have been her 13th summit of more than 8,000 metres, and left only Annapurna to conquer to become the first woman to scale all of the world’s 14 ‘eight-thousanders.’

Pasaban’s chief rival, South Korea’s Oh Eun-Sun, failed in October in a bid to scale the 8,091-metre Himalayan peak Annapurna, also due to weather conditions. That would have been the 14th and final summit in Oh Eun-Sun’s record attempt. “The Korean only has Annapurna. We will see each other there if we manage to scale Shisha Pangma quickly,” said Pasaban, 36. Weather conditions are considered ideal for climbing in the Himalayas in the April-May pre-monsoon season.

Other competitors for the record are Austria’s Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner and Nives Meroi of Italy. Kaltenbrunner failed in August in a bid to climb the 8,611-metre K2, the world’s second highest peak situated on the Pakistan-China border and regarded as the most difficult and dangerous of the 14 ‘eight-thousanders’. She remains at 12 summits, and must still scale Everest on the Nepal-China border, which at 8,848 metres is the world highest peak. Meroi has conquered 11. Italy’s Reinhold Messner became the first man to climb all 14 summits in 1986. The second to achieve the feat was the late Polish legend Jerzy Kukuczka, with many of his ascents on new routes or in winter. The 14 mountains are all located in the Himalayan and Karakoram ranges in Asia. afp

 

All Baskonia for Edurne, training with famous cyclist Roberto Heras

 

 

Winter Denali: Christine Feret off on the first female attempt with Artur Testov

Feb 24. The expedition kicked off yesterday from Alaska's Talkeetna: Christine Feret and Artur Testov were dropped on Kahiltna Glacier at 6,800 feet. “We will slowly go up, pulling all our gear and food (250 pounds) with sleds, ... read more

Feb 24. The expedition kicked off yesterday from Alaska's Talkeetna: Christine Feret and Artur Testov were dropped on Kahiltna Glacier at 6,800 feet. “We will slowly go up, pulling all our gear and food (250 pounds) with sleds, “Christine told ExplorersWeb before departure. “All going well, it should take a minimum of four weeks.”

Material of ExplorersWeb

No tents for McKinley’s wild season

 In winter, there is no BC or ranger service on the peak. The two climbers are not bringing tents. “Instead, we will go each day as long as we can and dig snow caves for the rest of the day,” Christine told ExWeb. “It takes about 4-5 hours to make a good one – days will be long!”

 “We are still taking a small tubular tent for safety, but intend to use it only in case of emergency,” Christine added.

 “We are bringing a couple of sharp heavy steel shovels for chopping harder ice,” Feret explained. “We did it last May at 17,500 and it worked fine. We are carrying a load of 270 pounds that we will split between our packs and sleds.”

 Ladder for crevasses

 “Artur is of course taking his ladder for crevasses as well! He will be first and in case he falls, the ladder should hold him before reaching too deep down in the crevasse – which is essential for a quick self-rescue and to prevent frostbite: At -40ºC, we don't have a couple of hours to get out of a crevasse like in summer time.”

 “We hope we will not have feet and feet of snow to push until Windy Corner. There can be so much snow until there in the winter. We will bring the sleds to 14,200 then will use a drag bag at the end of our rope for the Head Wall.”

 Ready to go

 Already familiar with the terrain since she climbed Denali twice last spring, Christine looks forward to get close up and personal with the peak off season: “This should be a fun wild adventure!!! I am the first woman to step foot on McKinley in the winter so it sure adds a little extra spice to the ordeal but either way, awesome mountain in extreme environment is exciting enough for me!!!”

 

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http://www.artur-testov-climbalaska.com/index.html

About Christine Feret

 

Christine was brought up in France and lives in Alaska with Artur along the Knik River, few miles from the Knik Glacier. An avid lover of Nature, Life and adventures, she has spent years traveling in remote parts of India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Philippines living her dreams and pushing her limits. She has a wonderful daughter Manon whom she dedicates this attempt to... "Put fears aside, and live your dream..."

 

 

About Artur

 

He started specializing in winter climbing in 1988 and first set foot on the Alaskan Mt McKinley in 1994. He has since climbed it over 10 times, using different routes and at different times of the year.

Artur was born in the small city of Riazan in Russia on August 4th, 1965. He started training in mountaineering as a young teen in the then USSR and dedicated his youth to this discipline. When not climbing, he specialized in the construction of high buildings such as church towers.

 

 Artur is a true passionate and purist. He climbs for the love of the mountain and the beauty of his discipline and not for any glory. He lives in the wilderness in Alaska along the Knik River and enjoys a very particular and amazing relationship with Nature.

 

 

Artur says he feels alive when he is out there. When asked why he doesn't try his winter climbs in March (still winter in Alaska), his answer is always the same : What's the point? If I'm gonna climb in winter, I'm gonna do it when it's really winter, with the cold and the short days. The challenge is at least as much fun as the success!"

 

In January 1998, Artur and his partner Ananich made international news when they successfully summited McKinley. They are the only climbers to ever summit in the dead of winter, January being the darkest and coldest month in Alaska. They used the classic route, called the West Buttress.

The following winter, he and Alaskan climber Trigger attempted the ascent of the Wichersham Wall but had to turn around after 3 weeks of grueling cold and blizzard.

 

Few years before, Artur successfully crossed on foot the 900 kms KaraKum Desert in Turkmenistan in August without any life support. He and his partner are to this day the only ones to succeed crossing this desert in an unsupported expedition.

 

On December 21st 2007, Artur attempted to climb solo the never summitted in the winter Wickersham Wall on the North Face of Mt McKinley. Also known as the "Wall of Darkness", it is one of the biggest ice slope in the world with a vertical difference of almost 15,000 feet. It does not receive any direct sunlight, the temperatures are almost constantly in the 60s to 70s below (-50 to -60 Celsius). The very common blizzards bring the windchill factor to well over 100 below (-75 Celsius).

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Arthur Tests (second from the left) came to Alaska for the first time in 1994, within a team of Seven Summits, the first time collected by Alexander Abramov (first from the left).

 

 

Deep Exploration in a Muslim country

Alexander Abramov and Ludmila Korobeshko rented a jeep to try for a week to get all of Morocco from Casablanca to the Sahara. The purpose of this expedition is to understand why this country is so popular in the west as the direction of ... read more

Alexander Abramov and Ludmila Korobeshko rented a jeep to try for a week to get all of Morocco from Casablanca to the Sahara. The purpose of this expedition is to understand why this country is so popular in the west as the direction of adventure tourism. And on this basis to draw practical conclusions.

Spend an unforgettable night in Casablanca, and looking at the Mosque of Hassan II in height of 200 meters (it is higher than the pyramids in Egypt), they went to Marrakech and from there to the village of Imlil - in the heart of the Atlas Mountains.

On the way travelers hit the great conditions of road and kindness of the local population.

Having completed a three-day trekking, Alexander and Lyudmila climbed the highest peak of the Atlas Mountains and throughout North Africa - Toubkal (4167 m).

Beautiful mountains ! Excellent shelter is located at an altitude of 3200 meters, with a hot shower.

Yesterday, they went down to Marrakesh. At 5 am the next day they started toward the Sahara, to travel by camel to the dunes and spend the night in a Berber tent.

Palestinian mother scales Antarctica's highest peak

Suzanne sets a towering example for Arab women. Suzanne Al Houby, the first Arab woman to scale Mount Vinson, Antarctica's highest mountain, is the vice-president of the Dubai Bone and Joint Centre. She braved subzero temperatures, fierce ... read more

Suzanne sets a towering example for Arab women. Suzanne Al Houby, the first Arab woman to scale Mount Vinson, Antarctica's highest mountain, is the vice-president of the Dubai Bone and Joint Centre. She braved subzero temperatures, fierce winds and frostbite to become the first Arab woman to reach the summit of the highest mountain in Antarctica, but Suzanne Al Houby is no stranger to adventure.

 The Palestinian mother of two, who lives in Dubai, is now the first Arab woman to scale the highest mountains in four continents. Suzanne has also climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa, Mount Elbrus in Europe, Mont Blanc in the Alps in western Europe, and Mount Aconcagua in South America.

Suzanne (right) sets a towering example for Arab women

 Suzanne said: "Although this is neither my first nor my biggest mountain, its location was in the harshest and the most isolated continent on Earth. Climbing to the top gave me an overwhelming feeling of pride because only 700 climbers have attempted to reach the top of Mount Vinson."

 Suzanne, who holds a day job as the vice-president of the Dubai Bone and Joint Centre, set out on her expedition on January 8 and took 18 days to scale Mount Vinson and return to base.

 Vinson is Antarctica's highest mountain at 4,898 metres. It is 20 kilometres long and 13 kilometres wide in the Sentinel Range in the Ellsworth Mountains, and was discovered in 1958 by a US navy aircraft.

 "An assuring voice was echoing in my head while I was climbing. It kept telling me that I was strong, that I had to keep going and not doubt myself. I had to constantly remind myself that there was no such thing as quitting."

 The day Suzanne reached the summit was memorable, as the temperature was well below minus 37 degrees. One hour before the expedition reached the peak, strong winds brought the temperature further down to minus 50. Yet she continued to climb.

 Harsh weather

"I could only enjoy the summit for less than five minutes because of the fierce wind. By simply being able to endure the extreme weather conditions without losing any of my fingers and toes due to frost bite is in itself a difficult goal to achieve."

 Suzanne's success in scaling towering mountains could be credited to her ability to isolate herself from the worries of the mundane city life, and merely focus her energy on purifying and cleansing her soul. While some people tend to immerse themselves in their jobs, Suzanne always makes time for her adventures no matter how busy she may be.

 She achieves this through efficient time management.

"God created the wilderness for us to appreciate His works, and Antarctica is the wildest place on Earth. It does not have any inhabitants and is also one of the most isolated. The endlessly white, bitterly cold, white nights on the continent redefined [my definition of] wilderness," Suzanne said.

 In order to endure the harsh weather while climbing, Suzanne had to harness her mental strength, which was as important as her physical strength. Her success was also achieved by keeping her head clear of distractions as well as focusing on her objectives one step at a time.

"The only way you can discover your full potential is by going to a place where you cannot take your comfort zone with you.

It is amazing how much, as humans, we can endure. I hope that other Arab women will get encouraged to do such climbs, because all you need is to believe in yourself and your potential," Suzanne said.

 

 

Suzanne climbed Elbrus in 2005 with a team of famous Christine Boskoff

gulfnews.com

Nine climbers reached the summit of Uhuru Peak by the Machame route!

This morning a group of Belarusian climbers of Club Seven Summits reached the highest point of the massive Kilimanjaro - Uhuru Peak (5895m). February, 19 early in the morning on the summit were: 1. Antonovskaya Ludmila 2. Varanitsa ... read more

This morning a group of Belarusian climbers of Club Seven Summits reached the highest point of the massive Kilimanjaro - Uhuru Peak (5895m).

February, 19 early in the morning on the summit were:
1. Antonovskaya Ludmila
2. Varanitsa Alexander
3. Klimovich Sergey
4. Yarunicheva Alena
5. Alexander Gordeev
6. Natalia Gordeeva
7. Gavrilenya Alex
8. Mikhail Korotkov
9. Konstantin Korotkov

Now the whole group went down to Mweka Camp at 3100m, and is celebrating its success.

We warmly congratulate our friends !

Josu Feijoo climbed Aconcagua controlling their diabetes and finished his 7 summits challenge

 The mountaineer form Vitoria (Basque, Spain) Josu Feijoo and teammate Jon Goikoetxea from a team of athletes with diabetes have managed to climb Mount Aconcagua - the highest mountain in South America. Josu has been climbed all times ... read more


 The mountaineer form Vitoria (Basque, Spain) Josu Feijoo and teammate Jon Goikoetxea from a team of athletes with diabetes have managed to climb Mount Aconcagua - the highest mountain in South America. Josu has been climbed all times controlling disease through 'Emminens Connect', a telemedicine system created by Roche 'Emminens Connect', which sent the message levels for mobile physicians in Spain. Josu became the third of diabetics to climb the highest peaks on all continents.

  Completion of this program a long time was postponed due of Fejoo's participation in the space program by Richard Branson. Last year he passed all tests in the U.S. astronaut training centers, but the flight is delayed. In April 2009, Josu chose the time and went to the "green continent", made an ascent of Mount Kosciuszko and Carstensz. On Aconcagua, he took with him another two diabetic climbers from other parts of Spain …

High on the Carstensz


 In 2006, Josu Feijoo climbed on the north side Everest and was on the summit on May 18, as the first diabetic in history. Two others famous diabetic Austrian Geri Winkler and American Will Cross climbed from the south. The Austrian, who came to the foot of the mountain on bike from the level of the Dead Sea (the lowest point of land on Earth) was on the top on May 20, and an American (father of six children), climbed Mount Everest on May 22. With this ascent Cross completed a program of "Seven Summits", Winkler did it two years later.

Become the first astronaut among people living with diabetes - this is now the main objective of Josu. Basque is going to fly within a team of Virgin Galactic, the private space tourism project, which implements the famous billionaire Richard Branson. During the flight, he intends to use insulin, a new generation, which has a longer effect.
With his spaceship


Now Feyo is 43 and 19 years ago he was diagnosed with diabetes type-1. He never stops mountain climbing, but only in recent years, he managed to reach a new level. He managed to establish permanent cooperation with sponsors and become almost a professional traveler. In addition to the "seven summits" on account Fahey dozens difficult climb at home and in the Alps, independent trips to the North and South Poles, and much more. Josu married, wife's name is Tanya and their daughter grows up.

 



"I have learnt how to exploit it, but not just for Josu Feijoo, more than anything I’ve done it for the whole group"
www.irrika.net
Published in : Enthusiast Written by Lorea Arakistain on 2009-04-06

“Where there’s a will, there’s a way”. And as far as this mountaineer is concerned, there’s no doubt that there is. He will shortly be packing away his mountaineering boots and, wrapped up in an astronaut’s suit, will be heading into Space. If everything goes according to plan, he will be the very first diabetic astronaut. So far, he is the first diabetic to have reached the two Poles and Mount Everest.

You’re going into space!

When I was five and used to write to the Three Kings of the Orient, I used to put: “I want to be an astronaut”. And yes, I can say that Melchior, Caspar and Balthasar, and Santa Claus or Olentzero do exist. Because in a few months’ time my dream is going to come true and I’m going to be so proud to be able to take my country’s flag, the ikurriña [the red, white and green Basque flag], into space.


Aren’t the eight thousand metre peaks close enough to the sky?

Mountaineering is a way of life, I’m going to be a mountaineer all my life. Life goes on, you meet that challenge, you do the North and South Poles, you scale 8,000 metre peaks, Mount Everest... But age, the social commitments you have with respect to research… cause you to close some circles and open up others. And if you combine the fact of closing certain circles with your dream of becoming an astronaut, you get the right chemical combination to make this little reality come true.

How did this proposal come about?

5 years ago when I was surfing the Internet, I saw that an American company was designing a spacecraft. I started sending e-mails to support the venture. And then to my surprise they sent me an e-mail thanking me for my encouragement and asking what they could do for me. I replied immediately saying: “I want to be an astronaut.” And they said: “You could try, only you’ll have to pay for the fuel.” And that was it.

And who is going to pay for the fuel?

A trip into space is terribly expensive, it costs thousands of millions. I spoke to the laboratories, to the companies that had been sponsoring my climbing projects. I have the support of some Basque companies that would love to see the ikurriña in Space, thanks to a few Basque politicians who spoke to them. These companies are not after the marketing, but are doing it to support the chronically ill. The impact that my trip is going to make as a chronically ill person is considerable. Nothing is going to be impossible any more. It will be complicated, but not impossible.

You’re going to conduct an experiment, and it won’t be the first one, will it?
We’re going to experiment with a new kind of insulin in which the hormone has been slowed down to a maximum. It isn’t about the hope of a cure but about improving quality of life. We’re also going to try out a new device for measuring glucose in the blood; it’s more modern and has a telemedicine system.

An adventurer, How and since when?

In the Basque Country being a mountaineer is easier than unwrapping a lollipop. But I don’t regard myself as an adventurer, although I do get itchy feet. I would never have thought that because I scale mountains that there would be companies that would want to acquire my image rights and that I could live off that. Although I’m in no doubt that this will soon be coming to an end.

A diabetic can’t be a fire fighter but can be a mountaineer or go into space.

There are people who have climbed with me and who cannot be forest rangers. It’s today’s Spanish legislation that imposes these barriers on us. I know that when many school kids find out I’ve reached the summit of Mount Everest, they say: “Why not?… I can do the same sport”.

How has diabetes changed your life?

It has transformed it. It started when I was 23. With your first wages you like having a night out, but all of a sudden an endocrinology specialist appears and tells you to forget everything you used to do and that you have to change all your habits. I was depressed for nine months; I had a really bad time. But then I realised that I didn’t want to live for diabetes.

You say you are finding out how to exploit your diabetes.

I can’t hide the fact that there are companies out there. I think I have learnt how to exploit it, but not just for Josu Feijoo, more than anything I’ve done it for the whole group.

The next success on Aconcagua

Today we received a message from our guide Victor Bobok from Aconcagua. Yesterday, 16 February, the group climbed the summit. The ascent was complicated by the fact that was started from the camp "Nido de Condores”. Everybody is very ... read more

Today we received a message from our guide Victor Bobok from Aconcagua. Yesterday, 16 February, the group climbed the summit. The ascent was complicated by the fact that was started from the camp "Nido de Condores”.

Everybody is very tired, but generally feels good.

Here is a list of those who stood on the highest peak of South America:

Victor Bobok - guide
Oleg Vorobyev
Valery Kurennoy
Andrew Levin
Anton Ostapenko
Andrew Podolyan
Tatiana Stukalova
Alexei Sushkov
Stanislav Shitkov

Congratulations to all !

Campanini Foundation saves lives

Federico Campanini lost his life on Aconcagua in January 2009. Created in memory of Federico, The “El Fede” Campanini Foundation is dedicated to providing information, guidance, training and financial assistance to support ... read more

Federico Campanini lost his life on Aconcagua in January 2009. Created in memory of Federico, The “El Fede” Campanini Foundation is dedicated to providing information, guidance, training and financial assistance to support ongoing efforts to improve mountain rescue on Aconcagua and in other commercial climbing areas. 


elfede.org
Federico, or as he was fondly known, “El Fede,” Campanini was an Argentine climber and mountain guide whose passion for the mountains and for life was contagious. Federico found solace and purpose in the mountains and he loved sharing his knowledge and love of them with everyone who knew him; the lives of his family, friends, clients, and many others were changed forever by his presence.
Mission Statement:

The endeavor will not be easy, but it is possible through the support from those who share Federico’s love for the mountains.

Text by Amber Christiansen, widow of Federico


Off to move mountains…it moved me

I left for Aconcagua on Jan. 13 with the head park ranger of Aconcagua. On January 15 we arrived at Plaza de Mulas base camp (14,000 ft) and we stayed there for 4 days in order to acclimatize. It was quite an amazing time in which I talked to many people who participated in the rescue efforts of Fede and the Italians (more than 60 in total participated in some form, whether by melting snow or trying to save Fede's life). All were very moved and affected by the loss of Fede's life and I think my presence was a positive one, a reminder that something positive can come from a tragedy. We talked a lot and discussed ideas for the future and everyone learned how to use the equipment. Many, both locals and foreigners expressed interests to support rescue efforts. In addition, National Geographic was doing a documentary on Aconcagua and its search and rescue system. They interviewed me; hopefully this will also generate international interest, we shall see...

In four days time, there were four separate rescue efforts. In each one, the equipment that the foundation donated was used.

On January 19 we installed the first rescue cache at Nido de Condores (17,700 ft). That night, a Czech climber suffered from pulmonary edema and we used the oxygen from the cache.
On January 20 we left at 7a.m. from Nido de Condores to Independencia (21,000ft.) Another group went to La Canaleta (22,000ft). After we installed the cache at Independencia we spent an hour and a half resting and talking about life. One hour later we received news that a woman collapsed at the summit of Aconcagua. The same group of individuals that had installed the rescue cache at La Canaleta helped the woman by using a litter and oxygen that they had put in the cache just one hour before. We had already started descending when we heard the call for help. We waited at Camp Berlin (about 19,000ft) for three hours to help them with the descent of the woman in the litter. By the time they arrived it was dark and ten of us (me being the only woman) took turns carrying the sled. It was a crazy time, and I kept focusing on the woman's eyes, to make sure she didn't close them. She was French and didn't speak any Spanish and very little English. She was scared and I tried to soothe her fears. When we got to Nido she was put on oxygen and then they descended her to Plaza de Mulas in a litter where she was evacuated the following day in a helicopter.

My goal was to save one person's life with the rescue equipment and this occurred just one hour after they were installed.

The next day a woman fell while descending and broke her leg. Again the litter was used as well as a trauma kit for stabilizing the break. The first aid kits that were stored at Nido de Condores were never stored, they were used every day, one incident after another.

I cannot explain life, or the events that occur, or why, when Fede was struggling for his life this equipment wasn't there, but it is there now, it is there now.

After this experience, and being there, and seeing the summit, I decided I needed to summit, to see what happened.

On January 23 at 12:00p.m. I summited Aconcagua. It was a struggle, I felt nauseas, but I understood the efforts of so many individuals who tried to save Fede.

Aconcagua is a community of people that share a love for the mountains, they take care of each other. Unfortunately they don't have the support of a government which should provide more resources.

So, on January 25 I began my return to the entrance to Aconcagua Provincial park. I decided I wanted to walk, even though I was offered a ride in the helicopter. It was difficult to leave, this community that works together and saw me as a hero. I am not a hero, but I did love Fede and I do also, love the mountains. I have learned more about the accident, and it continues to break my heart, but life must continue, it must.

T o understand death is to understand life.

There is still a lot of work to do but something is moving.

Please help support our cause to improve rescue efforts by sharing your thoughts and ideas in the forum or donating to our funds for rescue and training efforts.

Please contact amber@elfede.org for more information or questions on how to donate.

Chad Kellogg: Solo New Route on Aconcagua South Face…

The line of Medicine Buddha (VI WI4 M4, 6,500'/1,980m of new ground) on the 3,000-meter south face of Aconcagua. Chad Kellogg joined the Messner Route and then the upper Argentinean Variation above the enormous serac band.  American ... read more

The line of Medicine Buddha (VI WI4 M4, 6,500'/1,980m of new ground) on the 3,000-meter south face of Aconcagua. Chad Kellogg joined the Messner Route and then the upper Argentinean Variation above the enormous serac band.

 American Chad Kellogg has soloed a dangerous new line on the famed south face of Aconcagua (6,962 m).

Red line - route of Kellog, blue - exit variant of Messner

 Kellogg traveled to Argentina with Rory Stark, aiming to acclimatize on the normal route on Aconcagua's north side and then attempt a line on the south face. Kellogg also wanted to try a one-day round trip on the normal route.

 As planned, Kellogg summited via the normal route on December 17, but Stark was stricken with pneumonia high on the mountain. With the help of some fellow Americans, they descended all the way to base camp that day, but Stark remained severely ill and had to be helicoptered to town for treatment; he eventually returned to his home in Alaska and recovered.

 On December 21, after repacking their gear and laying plans for a solo attempt on the south face, Kellogg hiked in to the base. A snowy winter and recent poor weather had plastered the face with ice and filled in crevasses, leaving it primed for a solo attempt. Kellogg scoped an unclimbed, avalanche-threatened line between the 1982 Slovenian Route to the left and the 1954 French Route (the original line on the face) on the right.

 That afternoon, he hiked up to the foot of the face to check conditions. In an account of the climb that he wrote after returning, Kellogg said, “I was able to determine that the initial bergschrund was crossable and that the initial WI5+ pitch was flowing heavily with water and was best avoided. It seemed as though the majority of the climb was 65°-70° snow and ice, punctuated with vertical ice steps. The real difficulty lay in surviving the ice avalanches from the frequent serac falls. It was the summer solstice, after all, and the temps had really heated up. I walked away from the base, and minutes later a huge avalanche swept the route and avalanche cone where I had just been standing. I tried to steel my nerves against the possibility that I could be swept into that debris at the base from any point on the route within the next 6,500 vertical feet. I told myself that this was my route and in eight hours I would be on it.”

 Kellogg hoped to complete the route in one long day, and he took minimal gear: a 30-meter, 8.1mm rope, about a dozen pieces of protection, and a stove and one fuel cartridge. He brought a few extra clothes and double boots for warmth, but no tent or sleeping bag. “I managed to rest for a few hours before I got up at 1:30 a.m.,” Kellogg wrote. “I centered myself with a meditation session before preparing for my departure.”

 Leaving his camp at 4 a.m., Kellogg approached the face, crossing two large crevasses and the bergschrund. After climbing some snow slopes to bypass the steep, wet ice pitch at the base, he traversed left and then downclimbed and rappelled a couple of hundred feet to reach the central gully, where snow and ice patches allowed faster progress-a good thing because of the enormous serac bands that loomed thousands of feet overhead.

 Several avalanches fell down the route as he climbed, but Kellogg escaped harm. Above a rock step and ice pitch, he reached a snow basin below the biggest serac band at ca. 6,000 meters. A very steep, short pitch of ice on the left side of the seracs gained the upper glacier. At this point Kellogg had climbed about 2,000 meters in 12 and a half hours and was on pace for a one-day ascent.

 After a rest stop to brew a couple of liters of water, he traversed right to join the Messner Route (Reinhold Messner's 1974 solo direct variation to the French Route), still hoping to finish the climb that night. However, he soon encountered unconsolidated sugar snow and began wallowing. At 11 p.m., realizing he'd never make it to the top that night in such conditions, he downclimbed to the glacier and prepared for an open bivy.

 

Serac avalanche sweeps the lower gully where Kellogg had ascended. Photo by Chad Kellogg

  

Kellogg shivered for seven hours in temperatures he estimated at 10°F (-12°C). When the sun hit him in the morning, he continued upward, finding some better snow along with vertical ice and mixed passages on the upper Messner Route. By early afternoon he was within 400 meters of the summit ridge, but the snow conditions were very poor again. He had run out of water in midmorning, and he had no more fuel to melt snow As he continued upward, Kellogg's hands got soaked in the wet snow, and by evening he realized he had frostbite on his right thumb. He radioed rangers and told them he was near the ridge, and they encouraged him to keep moving and said they'd meet him at the Nido de Cóndores ranger station (at 5,300 meters) as he descended.

 At 10 p.m., Kellogg reached the high ridgeline between Aconcagua's two summits. He had been on the face for 42 hours. In high winds, he struggled down the rocky ridge crest until he reached the Canaleta scree gully and joined the normal route. At 1:30 a.m., he made it down to the ranger station, where he finally could relax and get some hot drinks.

 

Kellogg called his new line Medicine Buddha (VI WI4 M4).

 A few days later, on December 29, after recovering from his effort and getting treatment for his frostbitten thumb, Kellogg began an attempt on a one-day climb: a 50-mile round trip with 14,000 feet (4,275m) of elevation gain. He ran and climbed as far as Berlin Camp at 5,950 meters in 9 hours 15 minutes, but there he discovered that someone had broken into his gear cache and stolen the boots and equipment he needed for the summit. The speed attempt was over.

 Dates of New Route Ascent: December 22-24, 2009

 

 Sources: Chad Kellogg, American Alpine Journal

Kilimanjaro was climbed by our team.

According to the 7 Summits Club leader and guide of the current expedition to Kilimanjaro, Alexander Abramov, today 9 members of the 7 Summits Club in 07.30 at the morning reached the highest point of Africa - Uhuru Peak ... read more

According to the 7 Summits Club leader and guide of the current expedition to Kilimanjaro, Alexander Abramov, today 9 members of the 7 Summits Club in 07.30 at the morning reached the highest point of Africa - Uhuru Peak (Kilimanjaro massif).

Congratulations!

Romanian teenager Popescu conquers Oceania’s highest summit

  Romanian 15-year-old Crina Popescu, a member of the Altitudine Sports Club of Rasnov, on January 24 climbed the Carstensz Pyramid, at 4,884 m Oceania’s highest mountain summit located in Indonesa, becoming the world’s ... read more

 

Romanian 15-year-old Crina Popescu, a member of the Altitudine Sports Club of Rasnov, on January 24 climbed the Carstensz Pyramid, at 4,884 m Oceania’s highest mountain summit located in Indonesa, becoming the world’s youngest alpinist to climb this mountain.
The previous record was held by US Samatha Larson, who ascended the peak in 2007, at 18. Cristina Popescu is also the first Romanian ever to climb this peak.

The Australia-Oceania 2010 five-week expedition mounted by the Altitudine Sport Club set off to conquer three summits: Kosciuszka, Australia’s highest; Giluwe, at 4,368 the highest volcano of Oceania, and Oceania’s highest summit Carstensz Pyramid. Popescu managed to climb all the three peaks during the expedition.

Popescu has over the past three years conquered four of the world’s Seven Summits – Aconcagua, Kilimanjaro, Elbrus and Carstensz Pyramid and five of the world’s Seven Volcanoes – Elbrus, Ojos Del Salado, Damavand, Kilimanjaro and Giluwe.

The success of her feats has brought the young mountain climber one step closer to achieving her dream of becoming the world’s youngest climber ever to successfully walk this route.
Popescu will continue her expeditions in the second part of the year, when she sets to conquer two important peaks of the two routes: Pico de Orizaba of Mexico, at 5,636m the highest volcano in North America, and Denali, at 6,194 m the highest peak of Alaska, Altitudine reports in a press release ahead of their return home....

 

Alexander Abramov went to Africa.

Recently started a new expedition of 7 Summits Club to the highest point of Africa - Kilimanjaro. The expedition was led by 7 Summits Club’s leader Alexander Abramov. Before climbing members of expedition met with the most famous ... read more

Recently started a new expedition of 7 Summits Club to the highest point of Africa - Kilimanjaro. The expedition was led by 7 Summits Club’s leader Alexander Abramov. Before climbing members of expedition met with the most famous representatives of the African fauna: lions, tigers, leopards, giraffes and elephants.
We wish good luck!

New seven Summits Club's expedition to Aconcagua.

Feb. 1. Today started new expedition of 7 Summits Club to the highest point of South America – mount Aconcagua. It is the fifth expedition in our Club to Aconcagua in this season. All previous expeditions were very successful. More ... read more

Feb. 1. Today started new expedition of 7 Summits Club to the highest point of South America – mount Aconcagua. It is the fifth expedition in our Club to Aconcagua in this season. All previous expeditions were very successful. More than 30 people reached Aconcagua summit with our Club in this season.
Good luck and good weather!

Our team has climbed Aconcagua.

February, 2. This evening we had a call by satphone from 7 Summit Club guide Max Bogatyrev. He reported that yesterday all members of the 7 Summit Club expedition to Aconcagua successfully reached the summit. On the top of Aconcagua ... read more

February, 2. This evening we had a call by satphone from 7 Summit Club guide Max Bogatyrev. He reported that yesterday all members of the 7 Summit Club expedition to Aconcagua successfully reached the summit. On the top of Aconcagua (February 1) were:

Klopack Joseph

Arefiev Andrey

Arefiev Sergey

Zogrobyan Arman

Sadikov Vadim

Sadikov Grigory

Shapovalov Igor

Bogatyrev Maxim - 7 Summits Club Guide

We warmly congratulate them!!!

Nanga Parbat film restarts row over Messner brothers' fatal climb

 A film retelling mountaineer Reinhold Messner's legendary ascent of Nanga Parbat, in which his younger brother was killed, has reignited a bitter mountaineering row and prompted fellow climbers to attack as "false" the version of ... read more

 A film retelling mountaineer Reinhold Messner's legendary ascent of Nanga Parbat, in which his younger brother was killed, has reignited a bitter mountaineering row and prompted fellow climbers to attack as "false" the version of events being portrayed on the screen.

 A group of climbers who accompanied Messner, now 65, and his brother Günther on the 1970 expedition have criticised the makers of Nanga Parbat for telling only one side of the story – and have threatened legal action.

 The film, by the director Josef Vilsmaier, is being advertised under the slogan "two brothers, one mountain, their fate" and promises to reconstruct the events when Günther disappeared after apparently following Reinhold down Nanga Parbat in Pakistan, the ninth highest mountain in the world and one of the most treacherous to climb. From the start the film, much of which was shot on location, makes clear that it is telling the story "from the point of view of Reinhold Messner".

While Messner has always said that Günther, then 23, was buried by an avalanche, others on the trip claim that the older brother abandoned his altitude-sick sibling so that he could tackle alone the uncharted western side, the Diamir face.

 The discovery of Günther's remains on the Diamir face in 2005 gave support to his brother's version of events, but did little to quell tensions between expedition members.

Official trailer

 

 One, Gerhard Baur, said the film was biased and regretted that he and others on the expedition had not been consulted.

 "It is a constructed story, and is not the truth about Nanga Parbat … it is presented as if it were a documentary when it doesn't reflect the facts," he told the German magazine Spiegel.

 "The film repeats Messner's claim that … out of pure necessity he decided to descend via the Diamir face and that Günther was buried by an avalanche … I still don't accept this version of events … I was present three times when Messner spoke with great enthusiasm about his desire to tackle the Diamir face, saying that it would be the next leap in the world of alpinism."

 Baur said he felt "wounded" by the fact that the rest of the team stands accused of failing to offer their help to the younger brother. "It hurts a lot that those from the team who are no longer with us haven't got the chance to defend themselves."

 The expedition leader Karl Maria Herrligkoffer's son accused Messner of insulting his father's memory and said he was considering taking legal action.

 "I don't recognise my father as he's been portrayed in the film, and because he's dead he cannot defend himself," said Klaus Herrligkoffer, criticising the depiction of him as a tyrannical leader who failed to help the Messner brothers.

 Max von Kienlin, a fellow climber and former Messner friend, said: "The film is a falsification, adding things that didn't happen, and leaving out what did happen."

 Messner told German climbing magazine Klettern the film was intended to "trigger strong emotions in the viewers".

 

He said: "I personally didn't need to make the film, but it was important for my family. We're not trying to make a story about heroism, rather I wanted to ask critical questions of myself of what happened on Nanga Parbat."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jan/19/nanga-parbat-film-controversy