The Big February group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua started, the next stop is the Confluencia camp

Guide of the 7 Summits Club Andrey Berezin: The Big February group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua today went to the Confluencia camp. We will spend two days there. There will be no communication at this time. The ... read more

Guide of the 7 Summits Club Andrey Berezin:

The Big February group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua today went to the Confluencia camp. We will spend two days there. There will be no communication at this time. The next news will be from the Plaza de Mulas camp.

 

 

The group of the 7 Summit Club named Omichi with a guide Dmitry Ermakov climbed to the Mandara Hut on the slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro

A message from the slopes of Kilimanjaro from the guide of the 7 Summits Club Dmitry Ermakov: "We are in the Mandara Hut. Everything is fine. The weather is wonderful. All members feel good. Mandara Hut is the first camp on the way to ... read more

A message from the slopes of Kilimanjaro from the guide of the 7 Summits Club Dmitry Ermakov:  "We are in the Mandara Hut. Everything is fine. The weather is wonderful. All members feel good”.

  Mandara Hut is the first camp on the way to the summit of Kilimanjaro. The Mandara Shelter is located on the upper border of the forest, at an altitude of about 2700m, as a rule, already above the clouds. It offers magnificent views of sunsets and sunrises.

 

 

 

The Big February group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua started a climbing program

Andrey Berezin, the 7 Summit Club guide: The Big February group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua gathered in Mendoza. We got permits and went to Aconcagua National Park. read more

Andrey Berezin, the 7 Summit Club guide:

The Big February group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua gathered in Mendoza. We got permits and went to Aconcagua National Park.

 

A new group of the 7 Summits Club with a guide Dmitry Ermakov begins climbing program on Kilimanjaro

Seven Summits, hello! This is Dmitry Ermakov from Africa. Today, our new group named Omichi arrived at Kilimanjaro region, in Moshi, at the hotel. Everyone feels great, all things have not been lost. The weather is wonderful too. Members ... read more

Seven Summits, hello! This is Dmitry Ermakov from Africa. Today, our new group named Omichi arrived at Kilimanjaro region, in Moshi, at the hotel. Everyone feels great, all things have not been lost. The weather is wonderful too.

Members of the group  today went to the local market, got acquainted with the local flavor. We rented all the necessary things. So we are ready to climb. Tomorrow we are moving up to the Marangu route. Everything is fine with us and a best regards to everyone!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua under the leadership of our guide Vladimir Kotlyar gafter medical check is allowed to climb the summit

Vladimir Kotlyar, a guide of the 7 Summits Club: Aloha, friends! The group went through the acclimatization rotation successfully. Today is our day of rest and a medical check, which we also successfully passed. We are allowed to climb ... read more

Vladimir Kotlyar, a guide of the 7 Summits Club:  Aloha, friends! The group went through the acclimatization rotation successfully. Today is our day of rest and a medical check, which we also successfully passed.  We are allowed to climb Aconcagua.

The wind blows strong, tears tents even in the base camp. The connection was lost due to the wind, but now everything seems to be fixed ... We are waiting for the weather, we hope for good luck!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos from the ski trip to the South Pole under the program of the 7 Summits Club. Author: Vladimir Karakash-Solodovnikov

In January 2020, Vladimir Karakash-Solodovnikov reached the South Pole on skis. He traveled the ice of Antarctica under the program Last Degree of the 7 Summits Club as part of the ALE team. Thanks for the wonderful photos! read more

In January 2020, Vladimir Karakash-Solodovnikov reached the South Pole on skis. He traveled the ice of Antarctica under the program “Last Degree” of the 7 Summits Club as part of the ALE team. Thanks for the wonderful photos!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UIAA official site: Sofie Lenaerts on top of each continent

On January 4, Belgian climber Sofie Lenaerts completed a program to climb the seven highest peaks of seven continents. She did this as part of the 7 Summit Club team. UIAA official site published an interview with the heroine of the season. read more

On January 4, Belgian climber Sofie Lenaerts completed a program to climb the seven highest peaks of seven continents. She did this as part of the 7 Summit Club team. UIAA official site published an interview with the heroine of the season.

 

UIAA official site:  Sofie Lenaerts – on top of each continent 

 

Eleven years ago, mountain climbing enthusiast, full-time employee for the Belgian Federal Police and the face of Watch Out, a weekly traffic magazine show on Belgian television, Sofie Lenaerts scaled the highest mountain range in Europe, Mount Elbrus, a dormant volcano in the Caucasus Mountains. Sofie enjoyed the experience but soon sought new challenges.

 

 

In the ensuring years followed successful summits in South America, North America and Asia. It slowly dawned on Lenaerts that she was soon halfway to conquering the mythical Seven Summits challenge, the attempt to scale the highest mountain on every continent. So it was at 19:00 on 10 January 2020 after a seven-hour climb and withstanding bitterly cold temperatures and high winds, along with climbing companions Eva Lakiere and Miguel Madrid Lopez, she took the final, emotional step of the 4892 metres up to the peak of Mount Vinson, the highest mountain in Antarctica. With this, Lenaerts made her own piece of history. The Seven Summits challenge has long been an ambition for many mountaineers. In April 1985, American Richard Bass was the first documented person to climb all seven summits. If joining an elite group wasn’t an historic enough achievement, Sofie also became the first woman in Belgium or indeed the entire Benelux to accomplish this feat. She follows in the footsteps of UIAA President Frits Vrijlandt (Netherlands), a fellow Seven Summiter.

The 44-year old is something of a self-confessed adventure junkie, enjoying a myriad of sports including skydiving, kickboxing, motorcycling, scuba diving, skiing, trail running, kite surfing, speleology, high-altitude climbing and paragliding. In 2018, she ran and cycled 270km in 24 hours, from the lowest to the highest point in Flanders, as an ambassador for the Make-A-Wish “30 days without complaining” campaign.  It is a demonstration of the level of physical and mental preparedness and determination that has allowed her to achieve what for most of us would be impossible, with months of preparation having to go into each climb.

 

THE UIAA SPOKE TO SOFIE RECENTLY TO DISCOVER MORE ABOUT HER ACHIEVEMENT, HER PASSION FOR MOUNTAINEERING AND IN LINE WITH THE UIAA’S OWN ETHICS ON MOUNTAIN SAFETY, HER BELIEF IN RESPONSIBLE CLIMBING.

When did your interest in climbing, the outdoors and mountaineering begin? And how has it evolved over time?

I was invited to go indoor climbing when I was 24 years old. After that this same person took me rock climbing in the Ardennes (Beez, Freyr, Dave). After that came via Ferrata in the Dolomites (Italy) and rock-climbing small mountains (+3000m) in France and Italy. My first “bigger” mountain was Nevado Pisco, 5752m, in Peru. After that I decided I wanted to climb more peaks like this. I went to Ecuador, Nepal, Colombia, Argentina, Alaska and step by step I started dreaming of crossing the 8000m threshold.

Your quest to scale all Seven Summits was a feat which took place over eleven years. At which stage did you really take on the challenge of climbing them all? Was it something you had in mind when you climbed Elbrus in 2009 or is it something which came to you much later?

In the beginning I didn’t plan to climb the Seven Summits. Elbrus and Aconcagua were just an opportunity and I had chosen to climb Denali as training preparation for an 8000m peak. But when two expeditions to an 8000m peak had failed, I had the opportunity to climb Everest. After that, in 2016 I had succeeded in climbing it, I decided to complete the Seven Summits.

You have mentioned in interviews only taking calculated risks and getting to the top is really only the halfway point. This is a really responsible philosophy, and one the UIAA through its work across mountain safety promotes. In a world where sometimes people want to achieve things at any cost, how important is it to you that you are a responsible climber, who respects the challenge, the mountain and the mountain environment?

I believe that good decision making can only be achieved by true experience. You need years of practice in the mountains where you need to learn step by step where the dangers lie and gradually you will also learn what your physical and mental boundaries are. If you respect the safety rules in mountaineering, you can reduce the risks to accidents and find a healthy balance between wanting to reach the summit but also knowing when it’s time to commence the ascent and return safely. The mountains doesn’t run away and a patient climber has a greater chance to grow old and tell their story, whereas eager bold climbers sometimes die young.

In terms of preparation and planning, how much time typically went into each expedition (in terms of training, route planning, organisation and what were the most challenging parts to organise)?

For a big expedition like a group expedition towards an 8000m peak, it took one year but when I climb together with my husband (Stef Maginelle – himself an expert climber and first Belgian to climb two peaks above 8000m, without oxygen, during the same expedition), it’s between six to eight months. The last expedition we did was without a Sherpa or oxygen so we only needed to organize the basecamp facilities …something these days is very easy to do. The variety of commercialized logistics organizations is wide spread.  As for training, we try to keep in shape the whole year around and one month before departure we start our hypoxic training. Depending on the physical challenge, we adjust the training where needed.

 


 

Across the seven expeditions what was technically the most challenging moment, and what emotionally was the most memorable?

 

The most technical challenge was the Everest North side but not the most beautiful experience, that would be Denali, for I love to climb independently. For Everest and Vinson, I needed to make an exception. The most emotional were Everest and Vinson. Everest because it was my first +8000 m peak and I knew my husband stood on that same point nine years before and Vinson, because it was the last of the Seven Summits. One of the other climbs – not related to the Seven Summits – I learned most from was a solo expedition to the North Side (AD+) of Khan Tengri 7010m in Kazakhstan in 2015 (pictured above). I had to set-up three high camps, using two very small tents. I spent 14 days on the mountain because of continuous bad weather, but made it to the summit even when many other expeditions of male climbers turned back. I had to use fixed ropes from previous expeditions to climb the hardest parts and in a happy coincidence I met three Belgians, two of whom also made the summit. It made for nice company and for me, this climb, is still the most beautiful experience I have ever accomplished.

After a decade long pursuit accomplishing her dream, many people would be forgiven for settling for the quieter life.  An inspiration to climbers in her home country, she will be somewhere new soon chasing her next adventure.  As she says herself, “If you can dream it, you can do it”.

 

TIMELINE OF SOFIE’S SEVEN SUMMITS

Elbroes (5642 meters), Europe. Climbed in 2009
Aconcagua (6962 meters), South America. Climbed in 2010
Denali (6190 meters), North America. Climbed in 2012
Mount Everest (8848 meters), Asia. Climbed in 2016
Puncak Jaya (4884 meters), Oceania. Climbed in 2017
Kilimanjaro (5895 meters), Africa. Climbed in 2018
Mount Vinson (4892 meters), Antarctica. Climbed in 2020

Photos of Andrey Berezin from a successful climb on Aconcagua of the fourth group of the Russian Camp of the 7 Summits Club

The group of the Russian camp of the Club of 7 Summits on Aconcagua climbed the highest peak of both Americas Mount Aconcagua. It happened on a magical date - 02.02.2020. Congratulations to all the climbers! Further, according to our ... read more

The group of the Russian camp of the Club of 7 Summits on Aconcagua climbed the highest peak of both Americas – Mount Aconcagua. It happened on a magical date - 02.02.2020. Congratulations to all the climbers! Further, according to our plan, they have a long descent to the entrance to the Horcones National Park, which is about 30 km. Guides of the group Andrei Berezin and Boris Egorov marked the climbers with certificates and special badge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos from the climb on Ojos del Salado of the 7 Summits Club group under the guidance of Sergey Larin

The 7 Summit Club group climbed the highest volcano in the world, Mount Ojos del Salado, on January 30, 2020. Group guide Sergey Larin sent photos illustrating this ascent. read more

The 7 Summit Club group climbed the highest volcano in the world, Mount Ojos del Salado, on January 30, 2020. Group guide Sergey Larin sent photos illustrating this ascent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summit! The 4th group of the Russian camp of the7 Summits Club climbed Mount Aconcagua

The 4th group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club climbed the top of Mount Aconcagua under the guidance of Andrei Berezin and Boris Egorov. Now they are descending from the summit. Meanwhile, the Fifth group with a guide Vladimir ... read more

The 4th group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club climbed the top of Mount Aconcagua under the guidance of Andrei Berezin and Boris Egorov. Now they are descending from the summit. Meanwhile, the Fifth group with a guide Vladimir Kotlyar continues the acclimatization rotation. The team climbed 5,000, and today they have a day of rest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

He left a successful career to scale mountains and he's never been happier

Malaysian Tillai Muthu Nagarajan found his recipe for happiness. At the age of 50, he decided to leave the office and begin to lead a sporting lifestyle. Running, swimming, kayaking, climbing mountains. The Seven Summits program became his ... read more

Malaysian Tillai Muthu Nagarajan found his recipe for happiness. At the age of 50, he decided to leave the office and begin to lead a sporting lifestyle. Running, swimming, kayaking,  climbing mountains. The Seven Summits program became his motivation, became his goal for the coming years. Now Rajan has climbed six of the seven highest peaks from the program. He climbed two of them with the 7 Summit Club groups. This is Denali and Vinson. Ahead is Everest, which the Malaysian will also climb with our team under the leadership of Alexander Abramov. Read article

 

 

 

 

He left a successful career to scale mountains and

he's never been happier

 

When he turned 50 six years ago, Tillai Muthu Nagarajan decided to quit his high-flying corporate job and climb mountains. Rajan, as he is known, was the CEO of a consulting firm in Singapore, drawing a high salary and living a comfortable life. But he wasn’t happy.

 

 

“I wanted my life to be worth living and was just so tired of the routine of my nine-to-five job. I’d been at it for years... hating it, complaining about it, but still doing it day in, day out. I didn’t want my life to be all about work and getting stressed about meeting targets and all that.

  

“So, when I turned 50, I decided I’d had enough and I quit. I was offered a higher salary, a seat on the board and all that if I stayed, but I really wanted no more of that life. I wanted my life to be worth living, ” says the KL-born and bred Rajan, who turned 55 recently.

Since then, Rajan has scaled six of the seven summits (the seven highest mountains in each of the seven continents): Mount Aconcagua in South America, Mount Denali in North America, Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa, Mount Elbrus in Europe, Mount Vinson in Antarctica and and Carstensz Pyramid in Oceania. He is training to climb Mount Everest, the last of the seven, this year.

 

 Rajan (left) with some of the other climbers on Mount Denali in Alaska.

 

“Why do I do it? Wait, let me show you, ” says Rajan as he whips out his mobile phone and shows me photo after photo of his trips up and down the many mountains around the world. The photos, taken with only his mobile phone, show breathtaking scenes of snowcapped mountains, rolling landscapes, rushing rivers and stunning rock formations that are picture perfect.

“Mountaineering has really opened my eyes to how beautiful the world is. I had travelled a lot for work before but I never saw such spectacular sights as I did when I started going on these climbing trips. The views are just perfect and, believe me, my photos do not do them justice, ” he says, eagerly drawing up more photos for me to see.

 

Rajan says that he never tires of scenes on his climbs.

 

 

Discovering his passion

 

Rajan got his first taste of mountaineering more than a decade ago when he and a small group of friends decided they needed some adventure in their lives.

“We were all a little burnt out in our careers and were looking for something fun and challenging to do to revive our lives a little. So we decided to climb Mount Kinabalu. We even came up with a name for our trip: “Project Renaissance”.That was my first ever climb and though we did reach the summit, it took me about three weeks to recover from the climb! It was painful, ” recalls Rajan.

 

Rajan wasn't all that adventurous when he was younger. Now, he's game to try anything.

 

As tough as it was, the members of Project Renaissance found that they enjoyed climbing. The following year, the group of friends trekked up to the Everest Base Camp in Nepal and the year after that, they climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa.

“We tried to push ourselves a little harder each time. I really enjoyed everything about it... the challenge, the training, the adventure. Unfortunately, because I was still working, I often had to take a step back (from mountaineering) because of work commitments.

“So, when I turned 50, I decided that it was time for a change. I have absolutely no regrets. I am happier now that I have ever been, ” he says.

Rajan is also the fittest he has ever been in his life. Mountaineering requires a tremendous amount of physical and mental strength and Rajan starts training up to six months before each trip. When he’s not preparing for a climb, he runs and hits the gym daily.

“Climbing mountains is no joke. When you are a CEO, you have a secretary and a staff to help you. On the mountains, you are on your own and if you are not prepared, you perish. You have to carry every single thing that you will need (equipment, layers of clothing, medicine) up and down with you. This also includes your rubbish and also your bodily waste (you have to poop in a bag with a chemical that freezes the waste so there is no smell). These national parks are kept in pristine condition and they even make sure that you are cleansed before you go in, ” explains Rajan.

 

Mental fortitude is crucial up on the mountains. 

 

 Apart from physical strength and stamina, climbers need to be mentally and emotionally strong to survive the challenging conditions on the peaks. Rajan meditates and practises yoga to help him brace for the tough conditions on his trips.

“There are risk factors when you go these trips. Conditions can be unpredictable and you have to be prepared, mentally, to handle any situation. You also need to focus and deal with the altitude because you can be up there for weeks. I was stuck on Mount Denali for three weeks because there were strong winds that kept us in our tents for days. We had to do everything in our tents. Sometimes we bring a radio with us to keep us entertained but if you don’t have that mental strength, you will crumble.

“And when you have strong winds blowing against you... and I mean winds that are 30 or 40km/hour, you need to be strong. When you are up in the mountains, there is nowhere to go, ” he shares.

What makes it all worth the risk, he says, is the feeling of accomplishment when he reaches the summit.

“There were many instances when I didn’t make it. Either the weather conditions were bad or I was not feeling well or my team wasn’t in the best of health. It’s disappointing and frustrating and I always make sure that I go back and complete that climb. I am very determined because nothing can beat the feeling of reaching the summit. Being on top of the world, so to speak. It’s indescribable, ” he says.

Rajan may seen fearless, but he admits that there is still something, or rather someone, he fears.

 

The breathtaking vistas are another reason Rajan is glad he decided to choose climbing mountains over the corporate ladder.

 

“My mother! I may be 55 and I may climb the highest mountains in the world, but I am scared of my mother. I don’t usually tell her before I go on these trips because she will not be pleased. She worries about my safety. So I get my brother to tell her after I have left. That way she can’t say anything, ” he says with a laugh of his mother who lives in Brickfields, KL.

Mountaineering is also, he admits, not a cheap hobby, especially since his bucket list includes the Seven Summits and other mountains around the world. His trip to Antarctica to climb Mount Vinson cost him about US$45,000 (RM183,000) just for the park fees alone.

“It’s not cheap, that’s for sure but thankfully, I managed to build up quite a tidy nest egg before I quit to tap into. Also, I am single and don’t have any children so I don’t have many commitments. Why else should I work so hard if not to fund my passion?” he says.

Rajan also started his own consulting company based in KL where he focuses on strategic transformation of companies and leadership training.

“I work on a few projects but it’s a lot different from being tied down to a nine-to-five job. Now I work so that I have enough to fund my passion, ” he says.

 

SOURSE 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summit! The group of the 7 Summits Club with guide Sergey Larin climbed to the top of Mount Ojos del Salado and went down to the Atacama camp

Sergey Larin, the 7 Summits Club guide from Chile: Hello, Seven Summits! Yesterday, January 29, our group climbed on the top of Ojos del Salado, all three members and guide. Now we have already descended to the Atacama camp. We collect our ... read more

Sergey Larin, the 7 Summits Club guide from Chile: Hello, Seven Summits! Yesterday, January 29, our group climbed on the top of Ojos del Salado, all three members and  guide. Now we have already descended to the Atacama camp. We collect our belongings and move to Copiapo. From there I will send more detailed information with photos. We are OK.

 

The fourth group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua completed the acclimatization rotation and is resting in the base camp

Group guides Andrei Berezin and Boris Egorov from Argentina: The fourth group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua made an acclimatization rotation with an overnight stay on Nido de Condores (5600). Today we climbed to the ... read more

Group guides Andrei Berezin and Boris Egorov from Argentina: The fourth group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua made an acclimatization rotation with an overnight stay on Nido de Condores (5600). Today we climbed to the Plaza Berlin (5920), from where we descended to the base camp of the Plaza de Mulas. Tomorrow, according to the program, it will be rest. Future plans are weather dependent.

 

 

 

 

 

The Group of the 7 Summits Club completed acclimatization rotation. Climbers will wait for the weather window to climb Ojos del Salado in Atacama camp

Hello, Seven Summits! Information from Ojos del Salado. Now we are in Atacama camp, at an altitude of 5250 meters. The acclimatization process is completed and now we are waiting for the weather. Mount Ojos del Salado is all covered in ... read more

 

Hello, Seven Summits! Information from Ojos del Salado. Now we are in Atacama camp, at an altitude of 5250 meters. The acclimatization process is completed and now we are waiting for the weather. Mount Ojos del Salado is all covered in snow. Every day after lunch it snows. But we hope that we will be able to catch the weather window. Be! Guide 7 Summits Club Sergey Larin.

 

The group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua called "DArtagnan and the Three Musketeers" went on the route

A group of 7 Summits Club with a guide Vladimir Kotlyar called themselves DArtagnan and the Three Musketeers. And today the group began its movement towards Mount Aconcagua! Mules were sent forward with trunks up, and all persons went on ... read more

A group of 7 Summits Club with a guide Vladimir Kotlyar called themselves “D’Artagnan and the Three Musketeers. And  today the group began its movement towards Mount Aconcagua! Mules were sent forward with trunks up, and all persons went on foot on the route! The mood is excellent, the weather too.

 

 

Today we celebrate the 200th anniversary of the discovery of Antarctica! The 7 Summits Club congratulates everyone on the great anniversary date!

200 years ago, Russian explorers for the first time in human history saw a huge continent in the extreme south of our planet. 200 years of exploration of Antarctica! Under the sign of this date, we provided all our programs of the past ... read more

 

200 years ago, Russian explorers for the first time in human history saw a huge continent in the extreme south of our planet. 200 years of exploration of Antarctica! Under the sign of this date, we provided all our programs of the past season of ascents and trips on the Ice Continent. Three groups of the 7 Summits Club successfully raised the flags of the 200th anniversary and our Club to the highest peak of Antarctica - Mount Vinson. Our group members reached the South Pole on skis and climbed the highest volcano on the continent, Mount Sidley.

 

 

We pride ourselves on being one of leaders in organizing Antarctic travels. Climbers from different countries and continents took part in our trips. We invite everyone to join our travel to another, fabulous world, to a journey that will become one of the most striking episodes of your life! You need to decide in advance, such conditions of the game ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two Everests! Alex Abramov will climb Everest from the South! How everything will be organized in the 2020 season

The7 Summits Club continues to collaborate with RD Studio. A new film will be shot on the Southern slopes of the Greatest Mountain. The Everest expedition from the Nepalese side will be led personally by Alex Abramov. Along the ... read more

The7 Summits Club continues to collaborate with RD Studio. A new film will be shot on the Southern slopes of the Greatest Mountain. The Everest expedition from the Nepalese side will be led personally by Alex Abramov. Along the Hillary-Tenzing route, he will try to set a world record, climb 8848 meters without supplement oxygen at the age of 56!

The climb will be carried out in cooperation with a team whose goal will be to climb the neighboring eight-thousander Lhotse. There is time to join any of the expeditions. Although the deadlines are already running out ...

 

 

 

The decision was made at a business breakfast

Summit! Elena Ivanova with a guide of the 7 Summits Club climbed to the top of Mount Chimborazo

Elena Ivanova - at the highest point of Ecuador Chimborazo (6 130 m)! This time everything favored the successful ascent to the most distant peak from the center of the Earth, including the weather was more supportive. Moreover, after ... read more

Elena Ivanova - at the highest point of Ecuador Chimborazo (6 130 m)! This time everything favored the successful ascent to the most distant peak from the center of the Earth, including the weather was more supportive. Moreover, after powerful preparation and acclimatization in harsh conditions, the climb on Chimborazo passed for Elena somehow imperceptibly. Elena did not even notice the technical difficulty of Chimborazo and in all seriousness asked: "What was the difficulty?" Well then! Our applause!! Keep it up!

 

 

 

 

 

The fourth group of the Russian camp of the 7 Summits Club on Aconcagua made an acclimatization rotation in the area of ​​Plaza de Mulas

Greetings from the fourth january group on Aconcagua! Today the group spent the first night at the Plaza de Mulas, which is famous for the cold winds. But now the weather is surprisingly warm. Looks like summer has come here. In the ... read more

Greetings from the fourth january group on Aconcagua! Today the group spent the first night at the Plaza de Mulas, which is famous for the cold winds. But now the weather is surprisingly warm. Looks like summer has come here. In the afternoon we took a walk to an abandoned hotel. It seemed to us a little, and we made another small climb. After a walk, we had a wonderful dinner at the Base Camp. Guides of the group Andrey Berezin and Boris Egorov.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summit! A group of the 7 Summits Club with a guide Dmitry Ermakov climbed the volcano Orizaba

Seven Summits, hello! Dmitry Ermakov from Mexico. Today it was a difficult day. It was very, very windy, there was a lot of snow. But in spite of everything, we climbed in complete to the top. True, we were forced to split the group, ... read more

Seven Summits, hello! Dmitry Ermakov from Mexico. Today it was a difficult day. It was very, very windy, there was a lot of snow. But in spite of everything, we climbed in complete to the top. True, we were forced to split the group, because someone walked faster, someone slower. But, nevertheless, each of the members visited the top of Orizaba peak. Everything is fine, we descended, we are already in civilization, relatively. Tomorrow we leave for Mexico City. Bye! We are fine.